Time for a Different Approach: G20 Lessons and What’s Ahead

With the backdrop of Ukraine and missiles killing two people in Poland, it was surprising that G20 Leaders agreed to anything at all at this year’s Leaders’ Summit in Bali. So while the very existence of a Leaders’ Declaration (short of a full communiqué) was hailed as a positive, the document was heavier on narrative than substance. The role and risk of pandemics in this moment of converging crises were underplayed with only the creation of the new (and severely underfunded) Pandemic Fund giving some light to an otherwise pedestrian roll call of pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (PPR) issues.

So what did G20 leaders actually do?

Although the G20 Bali declaration name checks some of the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic right at the beginning — economic downturn, increased poverty, slowed global recovery, and hindering the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals — the issue then drops off until much later in the declaration. There are only a few health-specific paragraphs describing the ongoing COVID-19 response, which has been characterized by an astonishing lack of urgency and leadership throughout the pandemic. There is a reason we are looking ahead to the fourth year of the COVID pandemic.

While the Indonesian Presidency certainly deserves recognition for their leadership in getting the Pandemic Fund over the line and officially launched, the US$1.4 billion in its coffers is a far cry from the US$10.5 billion needed (per year!) to plug even basic PPR gaps (see the latest in our Pandemic Fund Tracker). Right now, we are only as strong as our weakest link. It is in our collective interest to ensure all countries and governments contribute, all take part in decision-making, and all benefit — a new model for a new era.

The declaration was too vague on Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) and reform of the multilateral development banks — especially at a time when Mia Mottley’s Bridgetown Agenda has gained traction and provides a clear roadmap for some practical steps that need the G20 behind them. It was good that SDRs got a mention, but the major economies should be signing over most, if not all, of their SDRs to LMICs, and at least the 30% put down by President Macron. Overall, the declaration was a missed opportunity to put wind in the sails of that agenda.

Bigger news on that front came in the post-Summit press conferences. French President Emmanuel Macron announced the convening of a conference in Paris in June 2023 where representatives will develop “a new financial pact with the South” — by advancing key issues, including SDRs, aspects of the Bridgetown Agenda, and climate finance. The commitment is a sign that at least one G7 leader has understood the vast scale-up of finance required for the resilience agenda to fight climate change and pandemics. (Note: Pandemic Action Network partners have been calling for this.) The Summit announcement was on the heels of a €50 million pledge to the Pandemic Fund — a good showing for France. 

Elsewhere the war and relations with China dominated. While the darkness of the ongoing conflict continues to unsettle us all, Biden’s 3-and-a-half-hour sit-down with Xi Jinping signals at least a line of communication that could help international coordination on climate and health issues — and of course, Ukraine. 

What’s ahead?

We now look ahead to the Indian Presidency of the G20 to build on the foundations laid by the Indonesian and Italian Presidencies and use the (welcome) extended mandate of the Finance and Health Task Force to give political leaders clear goals to achieve in 2023. These goals should include leaders working toward the US$10.5 billion the Pandemic Fund needs annually, strengthening health systems across the world, minimizing the chances of disease outbreaks while increasing the chances of swift containment when they do break out — and, of course, ensuring a truly equitable response to future pandemics while avoiding the mistakes of previous approaches.

Our leaders must learn to connect the converging crises and act accordingly — not only tackling the symptoms but the root causes of climate change, pandemics, and conflict before these spiral out of control. 

We look to India leading the G20, and Japan the G7, to work together with the African Union and other regional blocs to make sure as many countries as possible take steps together on these key agendas. We also need our leaders of 2023 to learn lessons from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and not repeat the deep divides of the COVID era that persist today. India is well placed to do that. It’s time for a different approach. With the still active Public Health Emergency of International Concern on monkeypox, Ebola in Uganda, polio showing up in wastewater around the world, and cholera outbreaks on the rise, the era of pandemic threats has never been more upon us or more vital to tackle. There’s no time to lose.

Call for G20 Leaders to Take Pandemic Action

Ahead of this year’s G20 Leaders’ Summit, over 50 global, regional, national, and local organizations are calling on leaders to put forward actions that ensure everyone has the tools to curb COVID-19 and prevent future pandemics. As health crises continue to set development progress back, impact our economies, and undermine the world’s ability to tackle other global challenges, joint and coordinated measures, policies, and investments remain urgent and necessary. 

While Indonesia’s G20 Presidency has advanced key agreements and proposals on PPR — such as the new Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (known as the Pandemic Fund) — there are further opportunities within reach for breaking the cycle of “panic and neglect” on pandemics. The Annual Meetings provide a critical opportunity to reassert leadership, deliver finance at scale, and kick-start the package of measures needed to pandemic-proof our world. 

Specifically, the group of organizations call on G20 Leaders to:

  • Deliver finance at scale for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).
    1. Channel US$100 billion in special drawing rights (SDRs) to the IMF’s Resilience and Sustainability Trust (RST).
    2. Release a roadmap to unlock new lending from multilateral development banks (MDBs).
  • Invest in pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response — with equity at its heart.
    1. Meet the Pandemic Fund’s US$10.5 billion target and advance a sustainable funding plan.
    2. Fund the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) 2.0, FIND — the global alliance for diagnostics — and public health institutes.
    3. Fund and support the Global Fund, Gavi, and other organizations also crucial to PPR. 
  • Prevent and prepare for the next pandemic by fixing gaps in the system and in policies.
    1. Endorse the creation of a high-level body to tackle global health threats and advance its set up through the UN High-Level Meeting for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response in 2023.
    2. Ensure equitable access to pandemic countermeasures and initiate a process to address this gap now and for the future
    3. Reinforce the importance of a One Health approach.

Outbreaks can be prevented, and new pathogens can be contained — but ongoing pandemics are a political choice. Decisive leadership can deliver a path to health security for people worldwide, where most outbreaks can be prevented, and new pathogens can be contained. We already know the solutions and investments required. Against the consequences and harm of pandemics, their cost is not only modest but is also much less considering the human, economic, and health dividends they reap. 

Read the full letter. If your organization would like to sign the letter to G20 Leaders, please reach out to Aminata

 

Shock and Gloom — But a Window of Political Opportunity?

The World Bank Group and International Monetary Fund (IMF) Annual Meetings came back in full force and in person Oct. 10-16, with road closures and large black security vehicles once again clogging streets of downtown Washington, D.C. As a veteran of the meetings and a global health and development advocate the week left me in turn feeling depressed, bewildered, and cautiously hopeful.  

Here are my top 5 takeaways:

  • Shock and gloom. The revised projections for global economic growth from the IMF were pretty dire: a sharp slowdown from 6% in 2021 to 3.2% in 2022, and set to decline again in 2023, with inflation rates higher than in several decades and triggering an acute cost-of-living crisis. IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva minced no words about the dangers afoot, saying there has been “shock after shock after shock” leading to historic fragility, a likely recession, and expectations of a global output loss of about US$4 trillion (about the size of Germany’s economy) over the next four years. The new edition of the World Bank’s Poverty and Shared Prosperity report found that since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, progress toward reducing global poverty has essentially halted and global inequality  increased. The headline on the World Bank’s own website — Development in Crisis — pretty much sums it up.
  • What pandemic? There was much hand wringing on what to do about the worsening poly-crises confronting the world today. Among the headlines were the launch of the IMF’s new Food Shock Window and the World Bank’s Second Ministerial Roundtable on Support for Ukraine, while the discussion at the Development Committee focused around two papers on the Food and Energy Crisis: Weathering the Storm and Achieving the Climate and Development Goals: The Financing Question. Notably absent from the conversations and commitments, however, was the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic (and when it did get a mention, it was mostly referred to in the past tense). A few important exceptions were the excellent speeches at the Center for Global Development delivered by three women leaders: U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, Indonesian Minister of Finance Sri Mulyani, and German Minister for Economic Cooperation Svenja Schulze, all of whom highlighted the need to increase investments in pandemic preparedness. There was also a spotlight on the learning losses as a result of prolonged pandemic-related school closures.
  • Next generation of protests. Two decades ago, protests were a common sight outside the Spring and Annual Meetings, pressing for debt relief and an end to structural adjustment and globalization. In the wake of major policy shifts like the adoption of the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, increased disclosure and stronger accountability mechanisms, and the inclusion of civil society in the Meetings which I was proud to help facilitate over time those protests had largely shifted to constructive dialogue. The protesters were back on the streets (and in the building) this year, once again demanding debt cancellation and climate action further fueled by World Bank President David Malpass’ widely criticized comments during the United Nations General Assembly.
  • A few billion here and there. Recent Annual and Spring Meetings had produced some significant commitments to help countries struggling to cope with the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, namely through a general allocation of special drawing rights (SDRs) equivalent to US$650 billion and creation of a Resilience and Sustainability Trust (RST) at the IMF to be funded by channeling SDRs from wealthy countries to low- and lower-middle-income countries. Georgieva announced that the RST was now operational with US$37billion in pledges (of which US$20 billion has been delivered thus far) and that agreements had been reached for the first three countries — Barbados, Costa Rica, and Rwanda — to receive support from the RST. Also in September, the World Bank formally launched a new Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (Pandemic Fund). With less than US$1.5 billion pledged so far and a first call for proposals not slated until late this year or early next, the Pandemic Fund still has a long way to go to reach the annual financing target of more than US$10 billion to close critical preparedness gaps and achieve its transformative potential. We are told more donors and pledges are expected soon, yet discussions on a sustainable financing pathway are some months away. But, on the bright side…
  • Reform is in the air. An undercurrent across the Meetings was that the two Bretton Woods Institutions created in 1944, are no longer fit-for-purpose  in 2022 to address a “world on fire” as the Vulnerable 20 (V-20) group of nations put it at their ministerial. Secretary Yellen set the stage with her pre-Meetings call to action to “rethink our overall development finance strategy” and “evolve our multilateral development bank (MDB) system” to meet this moment of unprecedented global challenges with the highly interconnected threats of climate change, pandemics, and fragility topping the priority list. Variations on this theme were echoed throughout the week by an array of leaders including former U.S. Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, Schulze, and many others. The wonky-sounding Independent Review of the MDB Capital Adequacy Frameworks, commissioned by the G20, gained support for a set of actionable MDB reforms that could unlock hundreds of billions of dollars in additional capital for global public goods. Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottley also doubled down on her call to leaders from the global South and North to come together and build a movement around the Bridgetown Agenda to modernize the international financial institutions with “the urgency of now”.   The conversation moved beyond the  rhetoric: A coalition of countries led by Germany G7+ Presidency requested the World Bank management to produce a roadmap for reform by December this year.

Will any of this actually lead to significant change? Time will tell, but something feels different. Pandemic Action Network is committed to heed Prime Minister Mottley’s call to action and help build the political will and the movement to make it happen. One thing we are sure of: From the climate crisis to the COVID-19 crisis to the next pandemic, the world can’t afford to wait.   

 

Pandemic Action Network Statement on the Biden-Harris Administration’s New National Biodefense Strategy

Pandemic Action Network welcomes the U.S. Biden-Harris Administration’s launch of the National Biodefense Strategy and Implementation Plan for Countering Biological Threats, Enhancing Pandemic Preparedness, and Achieving Global Health Security and the signing of National Security Memorandum-15 (NSM-15).

“The COVID-19 pandemic is not over, and Ebola and other deadly infectious disease threats are escalating around the world. The new National Biodefense Strategy rightly sounds the alarm on the urgent need to bolster our national and international defenses against biological threats and accelerate investments in pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response as core priorities for our national security,” said Carolyn Reynolds, co-founder, Pandemic Action Network.  

“As the new strategy affirms, it’s a myth that we can wall off the United States from dangerous biothreats, and it’s time for the U.S. and the world to get serious about treating pandemics as the existential and systemic threat they pose to humanity. By taking a comprehensive, integrated domestic and global approach and laying out specific targets and timelines for implementation, this whole-of-government strategy is an important step forward in that direction. Yet, none of this will be possible without robust, long-term funding to build and maintain our vigilance and readiness. Biodefense must be a bipartisan priority, and Congress must move swiftly to provide the necessary funding to fully implement this strategy.”

What is the Future of the Global Health Security Agenda?

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched in 2014 to drive multilateral, multi-sector prioritization and coordination of global health security. By definition, GHSA was designed to enhance country capacities to prevent, detect and respond to infectious disease outbreaks; emphasize global health security as a national leader-level priority and galvanize high-level commitments to global health security; promote multi-sectoral engagement and collaboration; and focus on common, measurable targets.

The GHSA is now at an inflection point. While GHSA has built a strong community, the COVID-19 pandemic has also stress-tested domestic and global health systems and raised questions about the reach, relevance, and impact of this partnership. Despite its success as a forum for collaboration and incubator for health security concepts and networks, GHSA has been less visible as part of the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic, missing an important opportunity to activate its coordination mechanisms to support global policy discussions on the future of the global health security architecture.

As the GHSA 2024 Framework enters its final year in 2023 — and as global leaders advance a range of instruments and mechanisms to make the world safer from emerging pandemic threats — now is the time to reflect on the lessons learned from the GHSA and its role in the evolving global health security architecture. The establishment of the Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (Pandemic Fund) at the World Bank, the Intergovernmental Negotiating Body on a Pandemic Instrument at the World Health Organization (WHO), and the UN General Assembly’s resolution to hold a High-level Meeting on Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response in 2023 all offer new promise to elevate the health security agenda. In light of these developments, GHSA members should reach a clear decision on the future of the partnership by the end of 2022 and ensure that the GHSA both informs, and is informed by, decisions made in these other fora, as part of a more systemic set of reforms to strengthen global health security and governance. 

Developed in partnership with the Global Health Security Agenda Consortium, NTI:bio, and Pandemic Action Network, this paper draws on reflections and feedback from a wide range of stakeholders engaged in global health security to assess the successes, challenges, and constraints of the GHSA’s structure and make recommendations for its future and the future of multi-stakeholder engagement for health security.

Read the full paper

It’s About Time: Pandemic Action Network Statement on Welcoming the UNGA Resolution on a High-Level Meeting for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response

Pandemic Action Network welcomes the resolution adopted by Member States today at the United Nations General Assembly calling for a high-level meeting on pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response. 

Such a high-level meeting of political leaders is long overdue in the wake of a deadly pandemic that has cost millions of lives and trillions in economic losses and has setback decades of progress in health and societal outcomes. Since its inception in early 2020, Pandemic Action Network has been calling for a high-level UN meeting to address the urgent priorities of pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response at the highest political levels. While sometime before September 2023 is better than nothing, we urge leaders from every nation to prioritize this high-level meeting and make sure it lays the foundations to elevate, accelerate, and sustain efforts to combat pandemic threats at national, regional, and global levels. 

This initial meeting, which should kickstart accountability measures, must be followed with a sustained series of high-level meetings to commit to the actions needed. The creation of a high-level council to tackle global health threats at the heads of state and government levels, inclusive of civil society and the private sector, should be one of the meeting’s primary aims. Such a council is much needed to ensure speedy and coordinated international action and accountability to address both existing and emerging pandemic threats.

As we now navigate this era of pandemics amidst pandemic fatigue, this high-level meeting is more urgent than ever.

The Pandemic Fund Action Hub

 

The Pandemic Fund Action Hub

Track, Analyze, Engage

On June 30, 2022, the World Bank’s Board approved the establishment of a new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) to mobilize new investments that strengthen pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (PPR) capacities at national, regional, and global levels, with a strong focus on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Such a decision — supported by multiple countries and experts — is a crucial step towards a future where pandemics no longer represent a global existential threat.

This nascent Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (Pandemic Fund) was established on September 8, 2022, after a group of founding donors agreed on the minimum necessary aspects for its operation. The World Bank hosts the Fund’s secretariat with support from the World Health Organization. Further work and agreements are required to ensure this new financial instrument will deliver on its transformative promise to make the world safer from pandemics. Among these are its focus and scope, structure, operations, governance, and financing, which experts estimate needs to reach a minimum of US$10 billion annually.

Since the process of designing and establishing the Pandemic Fund is moving swiftly, Pandemic Action Network has set up this dynamic resource hub to organize and facilitate access to relevant information. Moreover, this Action Hub aims to inform our partners and any civil society group about key developments and opportunities to mobilize, collaborate and shape the Pandemic Fund’s design and future operations.

Key documents

In this section, you will find public and official documents related to the governance and operation of the Pandemic Fund. Some of them can be preliminary versions or drafts under review by the Fund’s Governing Board.

Fund Pledge Tracker

Pandemic Action Network and the ONE Campaign are keeping a record of the pledges made to the Pandemic Fund. The goal is to better understand its funding sources and sustainability and to promote transparency and accountability through regular monitoring.

Access the Pandemic Fund’s Pledge Tracker

Civil Society Organization (CSO) Consultation Process

For this new Pandemic Fund to be successful and sustainable — and achieve its transformative promise to make the world safer from pandemics — there must be an inclusive approach to the current design process. CSOs must have room to inform the design, governance, priorities, and stand-up process. While we are supportive of the promise of the Fund, CSOs and low- and middle-income countries should be co-creators and decision-makers at every step of the Fund’s design and operation in order to ensure its success. Evidence from other mechanisms where CSOs have played an active role shows their involvement and contributions strengthen their functioning and enhance participation, accountability, and representation of affected communities. 

To catalyze needed progress toward meaningful inclusion, Pandemic Action Network, together with partners, the Center for Indonesia’s Strategic Development Initiatives (CISDI), the Eastern Africa National Networks of AIDS Service Organisations (EANNASO), and WACI Health, managed the official CSO consultation process to the Fund ahead of its establishment.

🗓️ Upcoming Sessions

    • None scheduled; please check back.

📚 Previous Consultation Outcomes

    • October 14, Civil Society & Communities Town Hall: Feedback from October 7, 2022 Pandemic Fund Board Meeting
      The Town Hall provided a readout of the October meeting of the Pandemic Fund Governing Board meeting on October 7, shared updates on decisions taken, tasks ahead, and invited feedback, reflections, and priority-sharing from civil society and community colleagues. The Town Hall also provided updates on formally establishing an active civil society and communities constituency, as well as a Civil Society Technical Working Group to facilitate regular, proactive channels for information sharing, and increase opportunities for experts from civil society and communities to inform technical decision-making around the Fund. 

      Readout & Notes

    • September 15, Civil Society & Communities Town Hall: Feedback from First Pandemic Fund Board Meeting
      During this meeting, interim civil society Board Members Jackline Njeri Kiarie and Elisha Dunn-Georgiou, along with alternate Board Members Nitish Debnath and Olya Golichenko, provided a readout of the first meeting of the Pandemic Fund Governing Board meeting (Sept. 8-9), shared updates on decisions and tasks ahead, and gathered feedback from civil society and communities colleagues.

      Presentation Deck (Sept. 15) | Readout & Notes

    • August 30 & 31, Second Round Consultations | Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages
      This document summarizes the discussions from August 30 and 31 and presents the ideas and recommendations emphasized by CSO participants on the scope and priorities of the PPR FIF. Annexes contain meeting notes, attendee information, and written feedback.

      Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages (Aug 30/31)

    • August 16 & 17, First Round Consultations | Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages
      This document summarizes the discussions from August 16 and 17 and presents crucial ideas and recommendations emphasized by multiple participants on three issues: governing board, civil society engagement, and technical advisory panel. Annexes also contain meeting notes and written feedback provided.

      Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages (Aug 16/17)

📹 Recordings

👥 Participation

Additional figures will be provided soon.

Interim CSO Representatives for the PPR FIF Governing Board

📢 Call for Nominations

Founding contributors in the new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (PPR) reached an agreement that its Governing Board should include two voting seats for civil society organization (CSO) representatives. Pandemic Action Network, the Center for Indonesia’s Strategic Development Initiatives (CISDI), the Eastern Africa National Networks of AIDS Service Organisations (EANNASO), and the Platform for ACT-A Civil Society & Community Representatives initiated a civil society-led selection process and issued a global call for nominations to select two interim CSO representatives for the PPR FIF Governing Board on August 26, 2022.

This interim selection process took place on an abbreviated timeframe to ensure that the interim CSO representatives could participate in the first Governing Board meeting, scheduled for September 8-9, 2022. The application deadline was September 2, 12 pm ET, and the eligibility criteria and nomination form remain available for anyone interested.

👥 Selection Committee

The group of organizations and networks facilitating the civil society-led selection process believed it was key that the composition of the Selection Committee reflected regional and thematic diversity. With this in mind, the group agreed to integrate it with seven (7) members. They were:

    • Ashley Arabasadi, Management Sciences for Health
    • Harjyot Khosa, International Planned Parenthood Federation (South Asia Regional Office)
    • Lizzie Otaye, EANNASO
    • Mike Podmore, Platform for ACT-A Civil Society & Community Representatives/STOPAIDS
    • Nahashon Aluoka, Pandemic Action Network
    • Neil Vora, Conservation International/PPATS Coalition
    • Olivia Herlinda, CISDI

⏱️ Timeline

👤 Selected Representatives

On behalf of the Selection Committee, we are pleased to announce that Jackline Njeri Kiarie (Amref Health Africa — Global South) and Elisha Dunn-Georgiou (Global Health Council — Global North) were selected as interim civil society representatives for the new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (PPR) Governing Board. Nitish Debnath (One Health Bangladesh) and Olya Golichenko (Frontline AIDS, United Kingdom) will act as alternates. They have all accepted their positions.

This process has aimed to ensure that a diversity of civil society experience, global perspectives, and regional representation inform PPR FIF decision-making, starting from the first meeting of the Fund’s Governing Board, scheduled for September 8-9. These representatives will serve for an interim period of approximately six months until full-term CSO representatives are named through a longer-term, civil society-led selection process. 

While ensuring interim CSO representatives are in place for this week’s first PPR FIF Governing Board meeting required an extremely abbreviated timeframe, 66 submissions were received from 27 countries during the one-week open call for nominations. We are confident that the selected individuals will be strong representatives of the diversity of global civil society, advocate determinedly for community voices and priorities in the PPR space, and collectively demonstrate the vital and constructive role of civil society in global decision-making.

Analysis & Resources

Closing the Gap: Pandemic Fund Tracker

Acting on the lessons learned from the COVID-19 crisis and the recommendations of several expert panels — including the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response and the G20 High-Level Independent Panel on Financing the Global Commons — the World Bank’s Board approved on June 30, 2022, the establishment of a new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) to mobilize new investments to strengthen pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (PPR) capacities at national, regional, and global levels, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). 

This nascent FIF for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (Pandemic Fund) is currently under design. Its strength and potential will depend on its vision, focus, structure, and governance — including transparency and inclusivity in all design and decision-making processes — as well as robust and sustainable funding, which experts estimate needs to reach a minimum of US$10.5 billion annually. 

Now is the time for leaders from around the world to support the Pandemic Fund so that it can deliver on its promise of addressing critical gaps in pandemic PPR and strengthening country-level capacity. Support from a broader base of countries — as well as from philanthropies and the private sector — is necessary for cementing sustained, global investments in pandemic preparedness as a global public good that bring tangible benefits to all and prevent another deadly and costly pandemic. But to fulfill the Fund’s mission, contributions must also be truly additional to financial commitments for other global health and development priorities and programs

Based on publicly-available information and intelligence gathered through our Networks, this tracker aims to record pledges made to the Pandemic Fund, with the goal of better understanding funding sources and sustainability, and promoting transparency and accountability through regular tracking.

Access the Tracker’s Data

Summary Analysis

Last updated November 18, 2022

As of this day, the World Bank claims the Pandemic Fund has raised pledges of US$1.4 billion. So far, we have identified US$1.41 billion has been publicly announced. Further contributions amounting to US$9.1 billion are needed to reach the US$10.5 billion annual baseline experts have estimated necessary.

19 donors 15 governments, 3 philanthropic organizations, 1 nonprofit organization, and 0 private sector organizations have pledged to the Pandemic Fund. According to the World Bank, six additional donors committed to contributing, but their pledges have not been announced. 

While it is crucial that as many countries as possible contribute to the Pandemic Fund, G20 and OECD members are essential donors. Because of their roles globally, these countries must set an example in contributing to and sustaining global public goods, such as pandemic preparedness and response. The following map shows the pledge status of such a group of countries.

Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response Tracker (Pandemic Fund)

Is the tracker's data accurate and up to date? If not, do not hesitate to share any intel or modification suggestions with us.

Methodology

  • Included pledges have been verified either by a government or multilateral website, and/or the World Bank, and/or a credible top-tier news outlet.
  • “Additionality” is defined as additional to existing global health and development spending — the term is used to qualify that the financial resources pledged are new compared to other financial resources already committed to global health, international aid, or other funding mechanisms. Donor-specific budget rules are also considered in the assessment.

More about the Pandemic Fund

Statement on the Introduction of the Senate FY23 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations Legislation

Statement by Pandemic Action Network Co-Founder Carolyn Reynolds

“The Senate FY23 State and Foreign Operations (SFOPs) bill tabled today takes meaningful steps toward urgently needed new investments in global health security, pandemic preparedness, and the global COVID-19 response. Critically, the Senate bill takes action on long overdue emergency funding — US$5 billion — to respond to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The amount remains far short of the global needs, but is a needed investment to help deliver vaccines to the last mile and help countries adapt to the current stage of this persistent pandemic that continues to upend lives and livelihoods around the world. Our Network is pleased to see that the bill’s emergency title makes meaningful down payments of US$950 million in pandemic preparedness priorities, including up to US$550 million for the Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Preparedness at the World Bank (Pandemic Fund). If approved, this would bring total U.S. contributions to the Fund this calendar year to US$1 billion, and set the bar for partner countries to marshal the US$10 billion needed annually to deliver on the promise of this historic Fund.  

While less than the US$1 billion for global health security in President Biden’s budget request or the FY23 House bill, the Senate’s US$745 million allocation for global health security programs also protects meaningful increases in this account from FY22 that will allow USAID and State to expand efforts to help countries build and sustain capacities to detect, prevent, and respond to emerging disease threats before they become emergencies — including through investments in the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovation (CEPI) and the Pandemic Fund. 

We urge Congress to move past pandemic fatigue and prioritize these investments to help stop the spread of COVID and to make America and the world safer from emerging pandemic threats. The pieces are there — now we need leadership and action.”

Pandemic Action Network Statement on a New World Bank Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response

Statement by Pandemic Action Network Co-Founder Carolyn Reynolds on the decision by the World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors to establish a new Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response: 

“Today’s decision by the World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors to establish a new global pandemic fund is an important step forward to heed the hard lessons of COVID-19 and make the world safer from pandemics. The fund offers the potential to marshal significant new financing to help prevent such a deadly and costly crisis from happening again. As the fund moves from concept to reality, global leaders should seize this opportunity to ensure it is catalytic, inclusive, and accountable. 

“The COVID crisis has shown us that pandemic prevention and preparedness is in everyone’s interest, and it should be everyone’s business. The US$1.1 billion pledged to the fund thus far is still a fraction of the estimated US$10 billion annually that global health and finance experts agree is urgently needed to bolster the world’s pandemic defenses. We urge more governments, philanthropies, and other funders to seize this moment to pandemic proof our collective future by stepping up and investing in this new fund.” 

Launching a New Pandemic Preparedness Fund: A Crack in the Cycle of Panic and Neglect?

Read the full analysis here on csis.org.

We are in a fragile, yet promising moment when it comes to heeding the lessons of the COVID-19 crisis. But a chance to begin to break the cycle of crisis and complacency and strengthen global security is finally within our reach, with the emergence of an international coalition to increase financing for pandemic preparedness. A new CSIS commentary from Carolyn Reynolds and J. Stephen Morrison discusses how the creation of a new Pandemic Preparedness Fund offers a near-term opportunity to mobilize significant new investments that are unlikely to happen otherwise, by using catalytic grant financing to close critical gaps in preparedness. Pivotal decisions remain to ensure that the fund has clearly defined strategic priorities that advance shared security interests; expands the pool of funding available for pandemic preparedness and response by tapping creative additional sources beyond official development assistance; and is steered by a decisive governing body. Strong U.S. leadership and financial commitment, bridging the U.S. administration and Congress, and resting on a durable bipartisan consensus, will be the single most important factor in moving the fund from its infancy into an instrument with the long-term vision, clear and unique purpose, and legitimacy to deliver rapid and sustainable results. Just as the United States led the world two decades ago to launch PEPFAR and the Global Fund to combat the global AIDS crisis, the United States should now lead and rally the world to launch this new fund and help prevent the next pandemic.

Read the full analysis here on csis.org.

 

Falling Short: Pandemic Action Network Statement on the 2022 G7 Leaders’ Summit

G7 Leaders fell far short of what is needed to finish the job on COVID-19 and prevent the next pandemic. Leaders are facing compounding and intertwined crises, but this is no time to deprioritize health security, which is fundamental to addressing virtually every other crisis facing humanity. This year’s G7 Leaders’ Summit represents a missed opportunity to take decisive action and fundamentally shift the G7’s record on pandemic preparedness and response.   Instead, we saw more of the “same strategy but different day” cycle of rearranging recommendations and commitments.

On finance, G7 Leaders collectively failed to deliver adequate financing to fund the provision of tests and treatments and delivery of vaccines still needed in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). While we are pleased that the U.K. joined other G7 countries by pledging funding for the emerging global Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness and Response fund at the World Bank, we need to hear that founding partners are committed to an inclusive, representative future fund which will include LMICs, communities, and civil society in its governance from the outset as well as equity in its decision-making. Overall, we need to see a commitment to investing in these ongoing priorities by growing the global pool of funding available for pandemic preparedness and response.

On governance, leaders also missed an opportunity to elevate leadership on pandemic preparedness and response by endorsing the creation of a Global Health Threats Council — as proposed by the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response — and laying the groundwork for a broader coalition of countries and leaders. A political mechanism of this kind is essential to sustain action and investment across countries and advance ambitious proposals, such as those described in the G7’s Pact for Pandemic Readiness

As the G7 focuses on the world’s stability with commitments on climate and food security, proactively preparing for pandemics must be a part of that mix. These existential threats are interconnected. Accelerating climate change means the world is more likely to experience future outbreaks with more regularity. Whether such outbreaks become pandemics or can be quashed in time hinges on the political choices leaders are making right now. And today, the G7 chose complacency and stagnation over progress when it comes to pandemic preparedness.

We urge the G7 to take forward the Pact for Pandemic Readiness and turn it into action with urgency in the remaining six months of this year and beyond. The COVID crisis has laid bare the costs of inaction. We cannot afford to move on without learning the lessons over the last two years — particularly for the most vulnerable and LMIC populations, many of whom still lack access to lifesaving tests, treatments and vaccines. 

The current and future G7 presidencies of Germany and Japan must prioritize getting bold pandemic preparedness and COVID-19 response action back on track as a key part of addressing the world’s interlocking crises — they simply cannot afford not to. Click To Tweet

What To Know Before the G7 Leaders’ Summit

The G7 Leaders’ Summit is just around the corner, and — as one of the five priorities of the German Presidency — pandemic preparedness and response is expected to have a central role in the meeting. In Germany’s own words, this year’s program aims “to expand the G7’s pioneering role in the commitment to pandemic prevention and control as well as improving the international health architecture.” While this might be a good omen for relevant agreements and commitments, the G7’s record on pandemics is not consistent and makes many of us wary. So, what do we need to know to understand the landscape and ensure this G7 goes beyond a series of photo ops and warm words?

A bit of historical background… Seven years ago, under the German Presidency as well, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa drove forward similar promises to those on the table in 2022. The 2015 Elmau Declaration contained crucial commitments, including support for the “World Bank to develop a Pandemic Emergency Facility” advanced by the G20 and strengthening of a mechanism for rapid response to pandemics. Side note, the 2015 declaration also includes clear language on “finding a solution to the conflict in Ukraine.” Déjà vu, anyone? We know that over the following years, these commitments lost traction and their implementation lagged. The following declarations — 2016 Ise Shima Declaration, 2017 Taormina Declaration, 2018 Charlevoix Declaration, and the 2019 Biarritz Declaration — progressively erased pandemics off the agenda until it made it back in 2020, this time under an unprecedented global crisis.   

So, what tells us that 2022 could be different? Germany’s G7 leadership this year is a reason for optimism. The country has made significant contributions to the ACT-Accelerator, has supported and raised funds for the COVAX Advance Market Commitment mechanism, and also committed financial contributions to CEPI and the forthcoming new Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response Fund at the World Bank. Moreover, in preparation for the Summit, Germany has convened high-level officials to discuss pandemics and pave the way for the Leaders’ Summit.

The G7’s preparatory work in May provides some hints and insights about what agreements might be in the making. Here’s a summary of the outcomes and work of the following Ministers’ meetings:

  • Foreign Ministers. They have mainly focused on the G7’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and on addressing gaps in the global vaccination campaign. On May 13, they released an “Action Plan on COVID-19,” which aims to align the group’s response efforts. In its last communiqué, they also noted that they are already working on “planning the ongoing COVID-19 response for 2023” but didn’t share specific details.
  • Health Ministers. Their last communiqué provides an overview of the issues and variables shaping the conversation and shows how the G7 is looking into preventing future pandemics and enhancing the world’s response to pandemic threats. Recently they released a concept note for a “G7 Pact for Pandemic Readiness,” which has a strong emphasis on surveillance. It is unclear though if other essential aspects for pandemic preparedness will also be considered by the group and how.  
  • Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors. As they are responsible for aligning commitments and funding, their last communiqué helps to understand what are the competing priorities. They expressed support for the establishment of the new Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response Fund, hosted by the World Bank, but they clearly stated that a broader group of countries should contribute financially as well. 
  • Development Ministers. This group has discussed the effects of COVID-19, as shown in their last communiqué, and has worked with Health Ministers to accelerate the G7’s response to ending the pandemic globally — putting emphasis on access to vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics — and increasing countries’ capacities on pandemic preparedness and response. It stands out that their support for expanding access to vaccines, testing, and therapeutics worldwide seems to rely only on voluntary technology transfer and not in more proactive measures. 

What’s missing, and what’s ahead? If after reviewing these different pieces you get a feeling that something is missing, you are not alone. So far, the information proactively disclosed by the German Presidency does not reveal specific actions or preliminary plans. It remains unclear how most of the commitments will be advanced and turn into concrete changes. With the information available up to this point, this next G7 Leaders’ Summit could yield good commitments but the risk of forgetting them in the coming years might be as present as in 2015. As such, the six months following the Leaders’ Summit will be critical to ensuring clear actions and setting the stage for Japan to pick up the G7 leadership baton in 2023.

If you are attending the G7, please let us know! Otherwise, stay in touch on social media.

Shifting the G7’s Record on Pandemics

Something has to change when it comes to global leaders’ response to pandemics. The concern used to be that panic-induced action at the outset of a pandemic turns quickly to neglect once the emergency is over. But COVID-19 brought a new additional concern: the cycle switched to “neglect” while still battling the crisis phase of the pandemic. 

The G7’s own record on pandemics shows the same pattern of panic and neglect. In 2015 — also under the German Presidency — the Ebola epidemic in West Africa brought a long list of commitments that echoes what should have been done to prevent the current crisis: assisting countries in implementing the International Health Regulations, making financing for response and preparedness immediately available, improving WHO’s capabilities, and setting up surveillance networks. Yet, these commitments failed to translate into tangible and sustained action. The devastating experience of the COVID-19 pandemic leaves no doubt that world leaders must break out of this “same strategy but different day” cycle of rearranging recommendations and commitments. At the forthcoming G7 Leaders’ Summit in Schloss Elmau, G7 leaders can either continue with the same approach to pandemics or kickstart a new one that makes falling into neglect simply impossible. What does this mean in practical terms? 

Put pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response in the diary. First and foremost, checking up on progress made on pandemic preparedness and response must be a regular fixture in global leaders’ calendars. Just as transnational threats like climate have led to the creation of the annual COP process to catalyze reduction of carbon emissions, pandemics need methodical political attention — and crucially, action — at the highest level. We need “ever-warm” response and accountability in the same way the COVID-19 pandemic proved the need for ever-warm manufacturing capabilities. 

Make pandemic prevention and preparedness a top political priority. Beyond regular meetings, an adequate response to pandemics needs a political engine with processes that assess risks and review progress systematically. The Independent Panel’s May 2022 report calls for “an inclusive leader-level health threats council that can galvanize political commitment to end the COVID-19 threat” — and we agree. The G7 should put its collective heft behind a critically-needed, broader, and inclusive, Global Health Threats Council of leaders to both convene in a crisis and create the momentum to catalyze the implementation of pandemic prevention and preparedness plans, based on new learnings from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Act with urgency at this year’s UN General Assembly. In line with setting such a political engine, we also need to turn it on as soon as possible. We need the world to be in a dynamic state of readiness, not caught unprepared as it was in 2020. A UN Summit on pandemic preparedness and response in the coming months in New York at the leadership level should be at the top of António Guterres’ to-do list. Such a leadership summit would set a standard and help breathe life into plans to regularly convene on pandemic preparedness and response at the leadership level. 

The very fact that many of the recommendations that came out of the Ebola outbreak are now being actioned or overtaken, shows just how little was done to properly implement the learnings from Ebola in 2015. While we are seeing progress on pandemic preparedness, that progress remains fragile amidst competing crises and inconsistent levels of ambition and commitment from all countries and their leaders. The establishment of the Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response Fund at the World Bank — bolstered by the financial commitments of the U.S., EU, Germany, Indonesia, and Wellcome  — will be instrumental but needs more countries to chip in and demand their seat at the table so that everyone contributes, everyone benefits, and everyone decides. Getting broad buy-in to a Fund that pulls away from the typical donor-led cliché will help set this G7 on the path to success, not obscurity. G7 leaders should affirm their commitment to an inclusive approach to the Fund’s governance, and G7 countries that have not yet pledged should use the opportunity of the Summit to do so.

In brief, Germany’s Chancellor and their G7 counterparts need to make sure pandemics are not only high on the agenda on June 26-28, but more importantly, that there is a new political engine — that goes beyond the G7 — to enable the world to banish the cycle of neglect to history. Acknowledging the elusive and unpredictable nature of pandemics, this would set us on track to effectively deal with present uncertainties, future unknowns, and provide the political forum for cooperation that was so desperately needed when nationalism and parochial interests saw countries pull up their drawbridge right at the moment they should have been opening up to coordination and collaboration early in the COVID-19 pandemic. This is a shift worth making, and one that would stand the test of time at the next German G7 Presidency in 2029.

 

Call for African Leaders to Support the Pandemic Fund

The COVID-19 crisis has demonstrated the devastating impact that epidemics and pandemics can have on the health, security, and prosperity of Africans. It has accentuated the need for a New Public Health Order for Africa — championed by the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC) — not in the least because of the gross global inequities in access to medical tools including vaccines, diagnostics, therapeutics, personal protective equipment, and other lifesaving medical countermeasures and supplies that have played out during this pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has also underscored the need for Africa to build more resilient health systems and collaborate across borders to be able to prevent, detect, and respond to emerging health threats while addressing ongoing health priorities. 

African civil society organizations (CSOs) have come together to urge leaders of African governments to pledge their support for the proposed new Pandemic Preparedness Fund at the World Bank and to ensure that the Fund advances the aims of the New Public Health Order for Africa through equitable and multilateral support. If well-resourced, the Fund has the potential to be a transformative new source of financing to advance Africa’s health security and to prevent the next pandemic. 

Read the full letter. If your organization is interested in signing on, please reach out to Hanna

 

Call for G7 Leaders to Take Pandemic Action!

Ahead of this month’s G7 Leaders’ Summit and in the face of multiple global challenges, civil society groups (CSOs) from around the world urge G7 Leaders to take action on pandemics to both align the global response to make COVID-19 a controllable respiratory disease across all countries and step up efforts to prepare the world against the next pandemic threat. 

While the outcomes of the last Global COVID-19 Summit and G7 Ministerial Meetings showed renewed political commitment and a much needed reset to the global response, ending this pandemic still demands further action. As noted in May’s G7 Foreign, Health, and Development Ministers communiqués, the pandemic won’t be over until it is over for all. Echoing their words, nearly 40 CSOs call on G7 Leaders to invest now to end the current crisis and prevent the next, including by addressing poverty and inequality as barriers to ending pandemics and through investment in national health capacity and community systems.

Three priority actions:

  1. Fill the financing gaps to advance the delivery of COVID-19 tools still needed such as tests and treatments, increasing transparency to foster coordination and enhance value for money. 
  2. Advance new, equitable, inclusive, and innovative sources of financing for pandemic preparedness and response, including through the new Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness Fund.
  3. Build on the G7 Pact for Pandemic Readiness Concept Note of May 20 to drive support for a whole-of-government and whole-of-society approach to pandemic preparedness.

The CSOs also strongly urge G7 Leaders to capitalize on the opportunity at the G7 Summit to publicly endorse the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response’s recommendation to establish a Global Health Threats Council and commit to advancing the proposal during the upcoming United Nations General Assembly.

Read the full letter. If your organization would like to sign on, contact Hanna by June 21.

Three Key Areas for Pandemic Action at the World Health Assembly

Last week’s second Global COVID-19 Summit challenged the growing complacency around the pandemic with commitments from over 35 countries as well as from the private sector, philanthropy, and civil society. Next up, this year’s 75th World Health Assembly (WHA75) will be a crucial opportunity to build on that momentum and rally more countries and leaders around a truly global framework to prevent, prepare, and respond to pandemic threats.

Here are three of the key priorities that Pandemic Action Network will be following during these essential debates:

  1. WHO’s vision and role in the global health security architecture

At WHA75, the World Health Organization (WHO) will put forward its vision for Strengthening the Global Architecture for Health Emergency Preparedness, Response and Resilience (HEPR). Broadly speaking, Pandemic Action Network is aligned with WHO’s vision for a stronger global architecture that focuses on improving governance, systems, and financing, grounded in the principles of equity, inclusion, and coherence (read our feedback) but we also think the framework is too WHO-centric. The last two years have shown that leadership and coordination for pandemic preparedness and response must extend beyond WHO, and beyond the health sector. That’s why we support the proposal to establish a governance body at the level of Heads of Government such as a Global Health Threats Council/Global Health Emergency Council — as supported by the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (the Independent Panel) and the G20 High-Level Independent Panel on Financing the Global Commons (HLIP). Pandemic threats must be recognized as the security and economic priorities they are, and translate to leadership and accountability at the highest level. We also think the principle of inclusion must apply not only to all countries, but also to non-state actors (NSAs) — like our Network partners — around the world. We’ll be watching for the final report from the Director-General, the reactions from Member States, and whether low- and middle-income countries and NSAs have an opportunity to be part of the discussions going forward.

  1. Sustainable financing for WHO

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that there is a major discrepancy between the expectations we have of WHO and its level of funding. Increasing WHO’s assessed contributions up to 50% of its budget is likely to be one of the most significant policy decisions we hope to see adopted at the WHA75. While the proposal is certainly not as ambitious as we and others have been urging  — both in terms of amount and time frame for implementation (countries will have many years to increase their assessed contributions) — it will be an important long overdue step. A stronger WHO is in the interest of all governments and their citizens. Investments in WHO produce an estimated economic return of US$35 for every $1 invested. The agreement to improve WHO’s financing model should not only lead to a WHO with increased capacity to detect, prevent, and respond to pandemic threats, but also to one that is more agile, transparent, and accountable. (For a deeper dive on this, watch our conversation with Björn Kümmel, Chair of WHO’s Working Group on Sustainable Financing). We’ll be watching to see if countries are willing to start paying their fair share toward building a healthier, safer world.

  1. Progress on reform of the International Health Regulations (IHRs)

Also looming large is the decision on proposed amendments to the International Health Regulations (IHRs). The IHRs (last updated in 2005) underpin the current international system to govern and drive the world’s response to global health emergencies. A proposal from the U.S. to fast-track amendments to the IHRs and give WHO greater powers in the face of emerging global health threats and potential pandemics drew significant pushback amid concerns about sovereignty. As of May 16, however, it looks like the most controversial amendments will be tabled for a longer country negotiation process, leaving mostly procedural changes on timelines for adoption at WHA75. If this sticks, it’s disappointing but not surprising, as it underscores a persistent lack of urgency and ambition to fix some of the systemic problems that resulted in this deadly pandemic. While not a silver bullet, targeted amendments to the IHRs are a necessary step toward greater accountability for improved pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response. We hold out hope that there will be some consensus around speeding up the reform process, both for the IHRs and on the range of other priorities Member States have been discussing in the Working Group for Preparedness and Response over the past year. 

One year ago, the Independent Panel called for bold action to make COVID-19 the last pandemic. Now, one year later, as the WHA75 comes together, the Panel’s former co-chairs have issued a scathing progress — or lack-of-progress report — that calls out inaction and incrementalism to date. 

Say the Panel co-chairs, Helen Clark and Ellen Johnson Sirleaf:The work underway to transform the international system lacks coherence, urgency, and focus. Reform proposals are being deliberated in different fora, but are not sufficiently connected, and remain still largely stuck in processes that will take years to deliver.”

Sadly, we have to agree. We hope that this year’s critical WHA75 can reverse some of that inertia and serve as a reminder that humanity deserves leadership that is willing to make a pandemic-proof future both a priority and a reality. 

Rallying Cry: The Role of Philanthropy in Preventing Pandemics

I believe humanity possesses the technical expertise needed to prevent future pandemics, but without the right leadership and the right plan more pandemics will continue to happen.   

Today, we face a disturbing future where political leaders are moving on from the COVID-19 pandemic before it is over for everyone and before we have made the changes necessary to ensure a crisis like COVID never happens again. Today, our politicians seem to move from crisis to crisis. This is not only a pathetic level of leadership, it is needlessly costing lives and economic devastation. In truth, we don’t fully know the fallout of this multi-year crisis. How many wasted lives will COVID cost? In fact, already, more American lives have been lost than the last century of wars. How many more pandemics will humanity endure before we generate the political will and allocate the financial resources to prevent new pandemics?

 

 

Future pandemics will be prevented… eventually. But, historically, humanity tends to meander into the future, slowly iterating towards solutions. Thanks to this iteration without a viable plan, we are likely to screw the next pandemic up less badly than COVID-19. The pandemic after that will be managed even better. 

Humanity deserves better than slow iteration on pandemic preparedness. Currently, at the global level, humanity lacks an agreed-upon plan of action and sufficient funding to prevent pandemics. Without a plan and focus, there is no foundation to build political will. 

From a cost standpoint, our failure to prevent pandemics is simply economic insanity. Look at the estimated cost of prevention, compared with the cost of remediation.

 

 

Preventing pandemics can happen. Experts have reliable outlines for what actions and systems are needed. There is even a consensus about what improvements are needed to international systems. The Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response is just one of several reviews of the global system to conclude that there are clear, distinct next steps that can be taken to strengthen the funding and operations of the global system for pandemic prevention.

Solving pandemics is essentially a political problem. Political leaders focus on the crisis of the moment, and they are not rewarded for long-term planning. On the contrary, they may be rewarded — as we are seeing now — for prematurely lifting public health guidance and moving on even when we’re in a pandemic. So here we are: seven billion people and no plan. Seven billion people lack the global leadership essential for creating a plan.

Philanthropists can play a critical role in filling this gap.

Philanthropy is free to address big questions and is positioned to solve problems from the point of view of the problems themselves. Philanthropists are uniquely free to take risks and invest money where it will have the greatest impact. We can choose to focus on the long term. 

Most importantly, some philanthropists possess excellent leadership skills. I believe this leadership experience, with the freedom of action we have, lets us as a group address an audacious question: “Can humanity prevent future pandemics?”  

Philanthropy can also strategically partner and fill gaps in the planning and coordination that is required to translate expert recommendation into meaningful systems change. Armed with a plan developed by experts, coordinated philanthropy can support civil society and help governments mobilize to act in a coordinated effort.  

Why not approach preventing pandemics from every angle?  

Or, put another way: If philanthropists can’t play a leadership role, show me the political leaders who will. Without our leadership and focus, no one will mobilize and crystallize the solution. Philanthropists must acknowledge that governmental responses to the COVID-19 pandemic are demonstrably inadequate and that philanthropy — together with civil society and other stakeholders across sectors — has a critical role to play. 

We cannot know if we will succeed. But we must seize this critical opportunity to catalyze coordinated action by global leaders. 

Philanthropy can help sharpen the tip of the spear to create the political will to prevent future pandemics.  

Feedback to WHO’s Director-General on Strengthening the Global Architecture for Health Emergency Preparedness, Response and Resilience

At the 75th World Health Assembly (WHA), the World Health Organization (WHO) will put forward its vision for strengthening capacities for pandemic preparedness and response through a report from the Director-General on Strengthening the Global Architecture for Health Emergency Preparedness, Response and Resilience (HEPR). The report intends to provide a new overarching integrated framework for all the health emergency reforms and processes underway and define the role of WHO.

Recently, as a part of the advance consultation process, Pandemic Action Network submitted feedback to inform the final report that will be delivered at the WHA. Pandemic Action Network supports the overall framing of WHO’s vision for a stronger global architecture that focuses on the critical reforms needed for governance, systems, and financing. This framing mirrors the Network’s strategic planning and reflections on challenges and opportunities at this stage of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read our feedback across the three key areas of governance, systems, and financing and stay tuned for the final report from WHO.

Pandemic Action Network Statement on the Second Global COVID-19 Summit

The Second Global COVID-19 Summit showed a renewed commitment to end the COVID-19 crisis and prevent the next pandemic threat. Against complacency and pandemic fatigue, leaders from over 35 countries, the private sector, philanthropy, and civil society brought forward new actions and commitments — both financial and non-financial — to meet urgent needs across the summit’s priorities of vaccinating the world, protecting the most vulnerable, and preventing future pandemics. Financial commitments totaled almost US$3.2 billion, with approximately US$2.5 billion in funding from governments, and approximately US$700 million from the private sector, foundations, and other non-government actors.

Statement from Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founder, Pandemic Action Network

Today’s Global COVID-19 Summit was a win against complacency and has provided a much-needed shot in the arm for both the global COVID response and to begin to prepare the world for the next pandemic threat. We are pleased that the Summit has yielded important new commitments to vaccinate the world, save lives, and nearly US$1 billion to establish a new Fund for global health security and pandemic preparedness. This is a significant down payment and enables the World Bank to move forward on establishing the Fund this summer. But we must maintain the momentum beyond today and political leaders must stay in the fight. This pandemic is not over, and the world must move faster to deliver lifesaving tools and prepare for whatever variant or pandemic threat is coming next. The U.S. Congress must urgently approve additional funding for the global COVID response, and other governments and private and philanthropic partners must step up support for the response and for the Fund as soon as possible. 

Statement from Eloise Todd, Co-Founder, Pandemic Action Network

World leaders‘ commitments at the Global COVID-19 Summit today have helped give a much-needed reset to the global COVID response. But without sustained and decisive action, the world could slip into permanent inequity between those that are able to be treated and vaccinated for COVID-19 and those that are not. All eyes are on global and regional bodies to see how they can build on today’s starting shot and deliver real progress by the G7 Summit at the end of June. 

As long championed by Pandemic Action Network, equity featured prominently in both reflections on the COVID-19 pandemic and in new commitments. We welcome commitments and new investments to close the funding gap for the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A), solve for last-mile vaccination delivery challenges, accelerate access to generic therapeutics, and diversify manufacturing and procurement of medical countermeasures to build strong and sustainable systems in every region of the world. 

Pandemic Action Network was also pleased to see political and financial support for a new Fund for Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness from across sectors. As we double down to end the COVID-19 pandemic, we also must look ahead and prepare both for future COVID-19 variants and emerging disease threats. Government leaders from around the world stepped up today to support a new pandemic preparedness fund and advocated for the need to include diverse voices in the design and governance of a new fund. Financial commitments from the U.S., European Commission, Germany, and the Wellcome Trust total nearly US$1 billion, and represent a significant down payment toward the US$10 billion needed annually for this Fund.

But while today’s Summit serves as a needed jolt to the global COVID-19 effort, there is still much work to do. Today’s financial commitments for response sum just over US$2 billion, and while this funding is urgently needed, it’s long overdue and far short of the current ACT-A funding gap (nearly $US15 billion). It is critical that all governments and sectors step up and prioritize significant new resources to end the global COVID crisis — including the U.S. Congress and Administration working together to transcend politics and quickly pass at least US$5 billion for the global COVID-19 response. In addition, it is critical to heed the call from many African leaders for Gavi, the Global Fund, and other vaccine purchasers to prioritize purchases from African vaccine manufacturers to ensure new facilities are sustainable. It will also be important for a diversity of donors and stakeholders to commit to the new Fund for Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness to ensure it is inclusive, representative, and effective. 

As we look ahead to the World Health Assembly, G7 and G20 Summits, and UN General Assembly, Pandemic Action Network will stay vigilant to make sure Summit commitments are realized and accountable, and that world leaders are collectively challenging themselves to do whatever it takes to end this crisis for everyone, everywhere.

Collective Commitment for the Second Global COVID-19 Summit

The following collective commitment was submitted on behalf of Pandemic Action Network for the Second Global COVID-19 Summit hosted on May 12, 2022.

Pandemic Action Network is a network of 257 organizations around the world driving collective action to bring an end to the COVID-19 crisis and to ensure the world is prepared for the next pandemic.

Pandemic Action Network is staying in this fight until the COVID crisis is ended for everyone, everywhere and sustainable systems are built at the global, regional, and national levels to proactively and equitably prevent, prepare for, and respond to future pandemic threats.

Pandemic Action Network commits to mobilize at least 100 new partners by the end of 2022, with an emphasis on organizations in lower- and middle-income countries, to advance the Summit goals to vaccinate the world, save lives now, and build back better for global health security and pandemic preparedness.

From now through the end of 2022, Pandemic Action Network and its global community of partners commit to: 

Vaccinate the World: Press governments, multilateral agencies, philanthropic and private sector partners to galvanize the necessary investments, coordination, and incentives to deliver vaccines that are still urgently needed in many parts of the world, including but not limited to closing the remaining funding gaps that have been identified for COVAX and the ACT-Accelerator. We will champion and support delivery of an accelerated, robust, and equitable global vaccination plan in support of national, regional, and global vaccination targets to achieve equitable global immunization levels.

Save Lives Now: Support efforts to drive forward a dynamic global test-to-treat strategy that applies lessons learned from the dramatic inequities in access to COVID-19 medical countermeasures and lifesaving tools. We will work to increase transparency on pricing and supply of tools to fight COVID-19, and make sure stakeholders prioritize access to testing, timely reporting, and treatments as the world transitions from crisis response to long-term sustainable preparedness for future surges of COVID-19 and other disease outbreaks.

Build Better Health Security: Mobilize political and financial commitments to stand-up and finance a dedicated new fund for global health security and pandemic preparedness. We will work with governments, the World Bank, WHO, philanthropy, private sector and civil society partners to design, launch, promote, and sustainably finance a fund that marshals significant new and sustainable resources for pandemic preparedness, as an inclusive and additive part of the global health architecture. 

In addition, Pandemic Action Network will promote cross-country and cross-regional cooperation, and sharing of best practices and lessons learned, to inform more effective and equitable pandemic preparedness and response plans and implementation. 

Pandemic Action Network will also maintain a steady drumbeat of advocacy, outreach, and civic engagement to keep all stakeholders — governments, private sector, philanthropy, academic, and civil society — accountable to their commitments and roles in building a healthier, safer future for all.

The Pandemic Action Network global community of partners commits to investing at least US$175 million between May and December 2022 toward these efforts, to help end the COVID-19 crisis and ensure the world is better prepared for the next pandemic.

Watch Pandemic Action Network’s submitted video commitment in advance of the Summit.

 

 

Calling for Urgent U.S. Action to Fund the Global COVID-19 Response

Statement by Pandemic Action Network Co-Founder, Carolyn Reynolds

“Once again, Congress is failing to advance urgently needed funding for the global COVID response, which means the U.S. will renege on its promises to vaccinate the world and save lives now. Refusing to treat COVID-19 as an active, deadly global emergency is a dereliction of U.S. leadership. The war in Ukraine and the global food crisis are clear and urgent needs — but so too is a global pandemic that continues to claim thousands of lives around the world each day. Every day funding for the global COVID response is delayed, more lives hang in the balance — and COVID will continue to pose a threat to Americans and to everyone on the planet. 

“Funding the global COVID response should not be constrained by partisan politics and deal-making. There has been a long-standing bipartisan commitment to U.S. global health and humanitarian response, and this issue should be no different. This should not even be a debate. Domestically and globally, we ignore the continuing COVID-19 crisis at our collective peril. There is no pandemic exit strategy for any country without a global strategy. We must push back against this dangerous inertia. Congress should act with the urgency that this crisis deserves and approve global COVID funding now.”

Amplify this call for action using this social media toolkit.

A New Fund for Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness: Why, What, and How

Health experts from around the world have warned for years that countries, regional bodies, and global institutions must invest more in critical capacities to prevent, detect, and respond to epidemic and pandemic threats. In the wake of each global health emergency, leaders and experts have stressed the need to sustainably invest in and build capacity for health security at the local, regional, and global levels. While the International Health Regulations (IHRs) and Joint External Evaluations (JEEs) encourage capacity building and assess country-level readiness to prevent, detect, and rapidly respond to disease threats, these instruments have not been paired with structural support or sustained financing. Given the legacy of panic-and-neglect funding for pandemics and the cross-border nature of these threats, many countries have not prioritized investments in preparedness, leaving the entire world vulnerable to novel disease threats. 

In 2022, global leaders from governments, multilateral institutions, philanthropy, private sector, and civil society must converge to design, launch, and mobilize significant resources for a new Fund for Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness, toward a target capitalization of $10 billion annually — reflecting conservative cost estimates and recommendations of leading global finance and health experts. 

The aim of this brief is to explain what a new fund should do, why the world needs it, and how it can augment and bolster the existing global health ecosystem.

Read the issue brief here.

Seizing the Moment: Global Action to End the COVID-19 Crisis and Prevent the Next Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is not over. The rapid global spread of the omicron variant has transitioned the pandemic to a new phase that requires updating our strategy and priorities to ensure a more effective — and equitable — response.

We are at a pivotal moment: progress on the global response has slowed, and we risk further setbacks due to the convergence of multiple global security crises with pandemic fatigue and complacency. The post-omicron global strategy must evolve, and requires global solidarity, coordination, and commitment to address short- and long-term imperatives.

These imperatives resounded throughout our jointly convened dialogue, Global Call to Action: End the COVID-19 Crisis and Prevent the Next Pandemic, on March 29, 2022. Diverse speakers joined by over 400 participants from around the world collectively identified four priorities set in a declaration to meet global needs at this stage of the pandemic and build stronger, more resilient, and equitable systems for the future: 

  1. Accelerate equitable access to and acceptance of vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics, building for the future.
  2. Support country-led and community-driven goals and priorities, with global support strengthening national and regional systems and advancing equity.
  3. Build and invest now to pandemic proof the future for everyone, everywhere.
  4. Drive accountability at all levels and commit to global solidarity.

Read the joint declaration by Africa CDC, Amref Health Africa, African Population and Health Research Center, Organismo Andinode Salud, Cayetano Heredia University School of Public Health, Center for Indonesia’s Strategic Development Initiatives, COVID GAP, Pandemic Action Network, ONE Campaign, University of Ibadan College of Medicine, and WACI Health.

También disponible en español.

The Network Effect on Pandemic Preparedness & Response

It has been two years of collective action. In April 2020, Pandemic Action Network formed to end the current pandemic as quickly as possible and ensure the world is prepared for the next one. 

Starting with 25 partners, the Network was built on a core operating assumption: Pandemics are too big, too numerous, and too complex for any one single stakeholder or sector to tackle alone. Two years in — and now in year three of the COVID crisis with over 250 partners around the world — that assumption is even more true.

Over the past two years, we have intentionally built Pandemic Action Network to be a diverse and agile group of partners — a global advocacy platform — where we can drive consensus for action without being hampered by the need to be consensus-driven. Today, we’re at an inflection point in the fight to end the COVID crisis and ensure a pandemic-proof future.

Our Year Two Impact Report focuses on the power of the Network Effect — our unique ability to harness the capacity, expertise, and influence of our diverse and growing group of partners across sectors and geographies to accelerate an end to the COVID crisis for everyone and advance meaningful change to pandemic proof our future. 

In practice, the Network Effect is fueled by a platform that is built for sharing timely information and intelligence, active brainstorming and strategizing, convening of experts and key stakeholders, openly connecting across traditional silos and boundaries, i.e., organizations, markets, sectors, and geographies, and targeted communications and policy and advocacy resources. The result is that Network members are better supported, aligned, and (often most importantly) not alone in taking action. Among the most significant roles for the Network is ensuring that pandemic preparedness does not disappear from agendas as policy makers — but also global health advocates and change makers — as many move on to other priorities in the wake of the crisis phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this context, our collective efforts are more important than ever. 

Our Year Two Report details lessons learned, our progress and impact, priorities for action, and how we plan to evolve to tackle the challenges ahead. It is a reminder that the agenda ahead is ambitious to match the complexity of pandemics. Our Network Effect must grow in order to meet the challenges ahead. Together, we must be relentless and stay in the fight until we have translated the promises and commitments of this crisis into a future in which humanity is better prepared to deal with outbreaks and prevent a deadly and costly pandemic from happening again.

Read The Network Effect on Pandemic Preparedness & Response — Our Year Two Impact Report.

To all our partners, thank you for staying in the fight! If you are not a partner of Pandemic Action Network and you are interested in joining our collective effort, please contact us

State of Play Report: Pandemic Preparedness and Response in Africa

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues into its third year, African countries are grappling with the fallout from this multi-year crisis. The pandemic has exacerbated geopolitical, national, and social divides, setting back years of progress on health and gender equity, education, poverty reduction, and social progress. Health and social systems are strained, making us less prepared to respond to pandemics and other health crises.

Even as we look ahead, the COVID-19 crisis still looms. The pandemic underlines the urgent requirement across the continent for a New Public Health Order, championed by Africa CDC, and the need to build on lessons learned from previous epidemics.

The State of Play report from Future Africa Forum, documents lessons learned from recent epidemics, highlights challenges, and provides actionable and practical pandemic preparedness and response policy recommendations in an African context.

Read the full report.

Read the related policy brief.

 

An African Agenda for Pandemic Preparedness and Response — Policy Brief

As the COVID-19 pandemic persists into its third year, African countries are grappling with the fallout from this multi-year crisis. Widespread loss of life, enduring disability, and broader economic and social fallout of the COVID-19 crisis has made pandemic preparedness an urgent imperative. With momentum around the call for a New Public Health Order for Africa, there is a window of opportunity for substantial policy reform at national, regional, and global levels. This is a window that must not be wasted.

Developed by Future Africa ForumAn African Agenda for Pandemic Preparedness and Response — presents practical and actionable recommendations aimed at enhancing pandemic preparedness and response capabilities and capacities for African policymakers at both regional and national levels. The policy brief is anchored by the State of Play report, a systematic review of African regional policy documents and initiatives relating to pandemic preparedness and response and engagement of civil society stakeholders.

Read the full policy brief here

G20’s Time to Act: A Sustained and Accelerated Global Response to COVID-19

In advance of the G7 and G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meetings — taking place on April 20, 2022 in Washington, D.C. — 40 civil society organizations from across the world have called on G20 leaders and finance ministers to urgently ensure the global response to COVID-19 is sustained and accelerated. Meeting this goal remains a critical variable for the world’s recovery, security and stability.

Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors are strategically positioned to make the G7 and G20 political commitments a reality by articulating actions and funding. The decisions they reach in these meetings and those scheduled in the coming weeks — ahead of the 2nd Global COVID-19 Summit — will reflect their true commitment to putting an end to the COVID-19 pandemic and preventing another crisis of such kind and magnitude.

Concretely, this group of organizations has asked all G20 Finance Ministers to consider the following actions:

1. Finance the COVID-19 response and pandemic preparedness and increase transparency to enhance value for money.

  • Swiftly fund the most urgent needs of low- and middle-income countries so they can deliver national, regional, and global targets on vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics, as well as delivery of all COVID-19 tools.

  • Fully fund COVAX’s Pandemic Vaccine Pool and delivery costs for all pandemic countermeasures through the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and country levels.

  • Fully fund the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) five-year strategy, so we have a head start in beating future pandemic threats through R&D that is designed to put equitable access at the heart of global pandemic responses.

  • Facilitate increased transparency in the production, pricing, supply, financing, and delivery of pandemic countermeasures to track tools from production to patients.

2. Innovate to deliver new sources of financing for the global COVID-19 response and pandemic preparedness.

  • Stand up and sustainably finance a new Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness Fund in 2022 to jumpstart financing for country and regional preparedness for pandemic threats toward a target of at least US$10 billion annually. Gaps to focus on can be identified through the Global Health Security Index and country-led processes.

  • High-income countries should urgently deliver the US$100 billion in recycled Special Drawing Rights pledged by the G20 through Multilateral Development Banks and ensure these are leveraged for global health and climate finance without delay.

  • Ministers should also explore other sources of financing beyond Official Development Assistance — including via the Global Public Investment model — prioritizing ending pandemics as vital to the world’s economic and human security and stability. Investment in primary health care systems must be included to prevent and better respond to future pandemic threats.

Amid the pressing issues that the international community faces, we must intensify our work together to accelerate momentum on the global COVID-19 response and ensure comprehensive pandemic preparedness in all countries.

Read the full letter.

Statement — INB Public Hearings for a New International Instrument on Pandemic Preparedness & Response

In December 2021, the World Health Assembly (WHA) established an intergovernmental negotiating body (INB) to draft and negotiate an international instrument — supported by the World Health Organization (WHO) — to “strengthen pandemic prevention, preparedness and response.” In the decision establishing the INB, the WHA also requested the WHO to hold public hearings to inform its work and deliberations.

The first round of those public hearings took place April 12-13, 2022. In response to it, the Africa CSOs Working Group on Pandemic Preparedness and Response, convened by Pandemic Action Network and PATH, submitted the following substantive elements for inclusion in the new instrument:

  • Recognize and protect the role of regional institutions and initiatives in responding to pandemics and epidemics as central in coordination, procurement, and distribution of medical products and tools, and technical support to respective member states. Such regional institutions should work in a coherent manner with global institutions.
  • Establish and protect a global pandemic preparedness fund that involves countries across regions in its design, governance, and financing, with all countries contributing to such a fund, based on their ability to contribute. The fund should support health systems strengthening in geographies with weak health systems and should have a strong accountability mechanism.
  • Elevate and prioritize leadership for future pandemics through, for example, a Global Health Threats Council, with meaningful leadership and representation from low- and middle-income countries. This body’s role will be to map out a strategic response that works for both public and private players in the health space.
  • Prioritize and finance a globally networked surveillance and early-warning system with incentives for countries to share data on and sequence new variants and pathogens.
  • Guarantee equity in access to lifesaving tools: declaring such tools as public goods and; instituting a waiver of intellectual property rights along with immediate hands-on technology transfer for all medical products and tools during a pandemic to ensure the maximum number of lives are saved, prioritizing the most vulnerable communities.

Activating Young Leaders to End the COVID Crisis and Pandemic Proof Our Future

COVID-19 has profoundly uprooted global norms. While the pandemic affects people across the globe, the impacts are different based on where you live and who you are. For the under-30s of the world, we will be hit hardest by long-term economic, social, and emotional stressors, and we will bear the brunt of the fallout if leaders fail to act on pandemic preparedness. With crises like global conflict, climate change, and potentially another deadly pandemic on the horizon, youth voices must be prioritized in change-making. 

Global leaders should engage and support youth in response to the current crises while advocating for future pandemic preparedness. Around the globe, 40% of 18 to 29 year-olds feel left out of designing or reforming public benefits and services. It is time to make space for new thought leadership, equip youth with the tools to address and mitigate pandemics, and invite them to the decision making tables. The onus is on youth to rebuild a more resilient global paradigm. Here’s how global leaders can support us:

  1. Tailor youth programming
    Use an intergenerational lens with youth-led and -designed programming to engage younger generations in responding to COVID-19 and working to prevent future pandemics. People under 30 account for half of the world’s population, so it’s important to engage with youth perspectives in pandemic programming. Review your organization’s pandemic preparedness and response initiatives to identify where you can incorporate youth voices and leadership to deliver on your goals more effectively.
  2. Step up and share the decision making power
    Two out of three countries do not consult young people as part of national development plans. This is an appeal to established leaders to give precedent for youth counsel. Advocating for the world to take pandemics seriously means providing youth-centered policy development and decision-making opportunities to support transparency, cooperation, and international disease monitoring and response structures. While established leaders must make space for younger leaders, this is also a call for youth to step up to the plate, advocate for pandemic preparedness across platforms, and hold international leaders accountable to their policy commitments. We need your voices to demand that future generations be spared from the impact of pandemic threats!
  3. Capitalize on youth social media savvy for pandemic response and preparedness
    We know that Gen Z is the first fully-global generation connected by digital devices and engaged in social media. But young people are more than just connected: they are savvy and have the potential to use their platforms to advance social good. Think about the K-POP fans who have organized around political activism. Now is the time to use the power and creativity of youth networks and partnerships to creatively break through, combat misinformation, and engage a broader audience on pandemic preparedness and response.
  4. Take action and amplify these youth engagement tools: 
    • Focus your energy on becoming a mentor with Global Health Me to connect with young global health professionals and students for a five-month mentoring opportunity.  

Every revolution in history has been led by young people. –Aya Chebbi

Build the Health Workforce Back Better to Prevent Future Pandemics

Frontline health workers are crucial for pandemic preparedness and response but for too long health workers have largely been taken for granted. The assumption seems to be that they are already ready and able to jump into action, keep health services going, and scale up one or another specific health intervention.

Yet, of all the factors delaying access to COVID-19 testing, treatment, and care, health workforce challenges are the most cited bottleneck, according to a WHO survey of 129 countries. Vaccine delivery has also been delayed by workforce inadequacies.

WHO states that these challenges arise due to “a combination of pre-existing shortages [of health workers] coupled with unavailability due to COVID-19 infections and deaths, mental health issues and burnout and departures from service due to a lack of decent working conditions.”

The factor of gender cannot be ignored. The health workforce is largely female, and it is not a coincidence that remuneration for their labor is often inadequate or inconsistently provided. Only 14% of community health workers in Africa are salaried, with many considered “volunteers,” part of the broader injustice of women’s care labor not being compensated.

COVID-19 has shown this is not just theoretical. Now, and in future pandemics, we need a motivated and supported health workforce to ensure acceptance and delivery of vaccines, disease surveillance, and risk communication.

Join the Frontline Health Workers Coalition and partners for World Health Worker Week on April 4-8 to push donors and governments to do more to protect and support a resilient health workforce.

Here a few ways you can get involved in World Health Worker Week:

 

Photo courtesy of IntraHealth International.

Call to Action! Accelerating an Effective and Equitable COVID-19 Response and Pandemic-proofing the Future

We are at a pivotal moment in the COVID-19 pandemic. With only 14% of people in low-income countries vaccinated with at least one dose, progress against the disease is at risk. Equitable access to vaccines, tests, and treatments remains elusive, compromising the health of millions of people, increasing the chances of more deadly variants, and endangering recovery. Now Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has brought a new security challenge, further threatening global health and safety. The humanitarian crisis in Ukraine and looming food and energy emergencies will continue to strain economies, people, and systems — not only in Europe, but also in other regions where progress against COVID-19 is still fragile.  

The convergence of different security crises with a still-present COVID-19 emergency will only deepen global suffering unless world leaders act urgently. It is essential that G7, G20, and all leaders not retreat from COVID-19 and acknowledge that ending this pandemic remains critical to the world’s security and stability. It is the time to double down and finish this solvable crisis — before the world is faced with a more transmissible or deadly variant, or even a novel pathogen. 

Together with over 30 partners, Pandemic Action Network calls on leaders to revamp their response to the pandemic in upcoming Summits and global coordination meetings taking place in 2022 and stay the course and secure the future, by prioritizing the following actions:

  1. Accelerate equitable access to and acceptance of vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics
  2. Provide new, diversified funding to fill country-identified gaps in response and preparedness
  3. Build now to pandemic proof the future

Read the full call to action here

This call to action is open for sign-ons. Please email Hanna if you’d like to add your organization.

Steps Taken, a Leap Required — CEPI’s Replenishment Statement

Today, as the world reaches a grim milestone of six million official deaths from the COVID-19 pandemic and as Russia wages war in Ukraine, world leaders gathered at the Global Pandemic Preparedness Summit to address what we must do better to prevent and prepare for pandemic threats. The Summit, organized by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and the U.K. Government, represented a critical opportunity for global leaders to prioritize pandemic preparedness and support CEPI’s groundbreaking 5-year plan to develop life-saving vaccines to help prevent a crisis of similar scale to the COVID-19 pandemic, including its 100 Days Mission to develop safe and effective vaccines in 100 days following an outbreak. 

Pledges of financial and political support were made in nearly equal measure with a total of 13 countries and 2 philanthropic donors pledging US$1.54 billion to CEPI’s US$3.5 billion five-year plan. Japan’s announcement of US$300 million made it the largest contributor, followed by the U.K. in addition to commitments from Australia, Austria, Finland, Germany, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Singapore, and the U.S. 

At least nine other countries (Brazil, Canada, Greece, Kuwait, Lithuania, Nigeria, South Korea, Spain, and Switzerland) and the European Commission expressed their support, though no specific financial contribution was mentioned. 

While this is a welcome and important first step toward a world that is better prepared for pandemic threats, it is disappointing that many governments failed to match political support with bold and meaningful financial commitments. The COVID-19 pandemic showed us that the world is ill-prepared to prevent and respond to a pandemic caused by a novel respiratory pathogen. The pandemic research and development (R&D) system as it exists does not work to address the challenges of emerging infectious diseases. As we look toward year three of COVID, we are already witnessing the familiar and costly cycle of panic and neglect around pandemics spinning into motion. CEPI’s plan to reduce vaccine development time to 100 days is one in a set of critical measures to get ahead of the cycle of panic and neglect and avoid another trillion-dollar pandemic that needlessly costs millions of lives and livelihoods. 

Eloise Todd, Pandemic Action Network’s co-founder, said:

“While today’s commitments of over US$1.5 billion to CEPI are a welcome and strong start, they are not enough. The COVID crisis showed us that the vaccine R&D system as it exists cannot meet the challenges of emerging infectious diseases before they cause severe damage, nor can it ensure all people everywhere have equitable access to the tools and technologies they need to curb a global health emergency. Leaders can avoid repeating past mistakes and build a system that is forward looking and equitable. Fully funding CEPI is an impactful way to do just that. An investment in CEPI is a fraction of the trillions lost to pandemic response and an investment that pays a multitude of dividends. We expect key global leaders to step up in the coming weeks to align their financial commitments with their political commitments, and make a fully-funded CEPI a reality.”

Pandemic Action Network and its network of over 250 partners will follow up closely on the actions of governments, philanthropies, and decision makers who have expressed their commitment to this goal, especially those key global leaders who can convene other governments, rally support, and mobilize resources. Building on the strong momentum from the Global Pandemic Preparedness Summit, concerted action from world leaders in the coming months will be crucial to fully fund CEPI and ensuring the COVID crisis leaves a legacy of pandemic preparedness.

CEPI’s Unique Impact Opportunity: Pandemic Preparedness & Response R&D

The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was founded with the mission to accelerate the development of vaccines against emerging infectious diseases (EID) and enable equitable access for all during outbreaks. Less than three years after its start, CEPI’s quick response during the COVID-19 pandemic propelled the development and manufacturing of new vaccines and it was the only entity with the mandate to invest in de-risking COVID-19 vaccine research and development (R&D) with global access in mind. CEPI’s role fills some of the critical gaps that governments do not address and on March 7-8, the U.K. Government will host the CEPI replenishment at the Pandemic Preparedness Summit. The replenishment aims to raise US$3.5 billion for the delivery of CEPI’s critical 2022-2026 strategy to accelerate the development of vaccines and other health tools against epidemic and pandemic threats.

Produced by Pandemic Action Network and DSW, CEPI’s Unique Impact Opportunity: Pandemic Preparedness & Response R&D examines the characteristics and ways in which CEPI is distinctly positioned to bolster global and regional health security initiatives, especially through vaccine R&D against EIDs, to ensure the world is equipped to end the COVID crisis for everyone and is better prepared for the next pandemic.

Key messages of the brief explainer include:

  • CEPI is uniquely positioned to address global pandemic threats through vaccine R&D for emerging infectious diseases.
  • Because of its commitment to equitable access for the global good, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, CEPI’s work leads to increased access and distribution of much-needed vaccines to traditionally underserved populations.
  • Building on its role, investments, and relationships, CEPI delivers catalytic impact globally in pandemic preparedness and response.
  • CEPI fills critical gaps in the vaccine R&D ecosystem that would otherwise go unfilled.
  • Emerging infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, do not recognize international borders. CEPI’s global mandate naturally complements regional and national R&D institutions that work to counter pandemic threats.

Read the full brief.

Amplify these messages using our social media toolkit.

Calling for Bold Pandemic Action at the EU-AU Summit

African and European civil society organizations (CSOs) call on leaders in advance of the African Union (AU) – European Union (EU) Summit on February 17-18, 2022, to show solidarity in ending not only the COVID-19 crisis but also responding to global epidemics including HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria and put in place mechanisms and resources to build resilience and prepare for future pandemics. It’s time for strong and sustained political will, collective alignment, and integrated end-to-end approaches. We call on leaders to adopt the following actions at the Summit:

  1. Tackle the crisis of inequitable access to COVID-19 vaccines, and support vaccination programs
  2. Address the crisis of inequitable access to COVID-19 tools, including tests, treatments, oxygen, and PPE
  3. Invest in and strengthen the research and development (R&D) capacity in Africa
  4. Support Africa’s mRNA Technology Transfer Hub and agree to waive intellectual property (IP) for COVID-19 vaccines and other medical tools
  5. Support health systems strengthening in African countries to enable prevention, detection and response to new and existing threats
  6. Reform and strengthen multilateralism

Humanity deserves a world where every country is equipped to end the COVID-19 crisis and every country is prepared to stop infectious disease outbreaks from becoming deadly and costly pandemics. 

Read the full letter.

Organizations are welcome to sign on to the letter by Feb. 17, 2022. If your organization would like to sign on, please reach out to Aminata Wurie.

Personal Protective Equipment for Frontline Health Workers: An Essential Component of Pandemic Preparedness & Response

In December 2020, Pandemic Action Network’s Pandemic Action Agenda series urged world leaders to strengthen global health security architecture and governance in key areas, including pandemic supplies, to increase accountability and ensure the world is better prepared for the next pandemic and to respond to COVID-19.

This brief takes stock of progress made since December 2020 to resolve the global personal protective equipment (PPE) access crisis, aims to assess supply and demand challenges specific to community health workers, and informs recommendations for world, regional, and national leaders to build a more reliable and sustainable emergency response supply chain for the future.

Today, we have compelling evidence of the risk of leaving frontline health workers unprotected or partially protected against COVID-19, and we still lack sustainable solutions. As we look toward year three of this pandemic and beyond, world, regional, and national leaders must learn the lessons of this crisis and continue to prioritize sufficient PPE for frontline health workers — especially those who serve the most vulnerable and hardest-to-reach populations.

Read the full brief here.

Pandemic R&D Agenda for Action: Fostering Innovation to End This Pandemic and Prepare for the Next One

As the world commences the third year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the case for investment in research and development (R&D) for medical countermeasures to prevent and combat emerging global health threats is stronger than ever. Despite tremendous scientific accomplishments in 2020-21, systemic gaps in pandemic-related R&D systems, supply chains, manufacturing, and delivery continue to stymie the roll-out of urgently needed technologies to all people who need them, everywhere, and are prolonging the pandemic.

COVID-19 and its variants have exposed longstanding market and systems failures and fragilities that pose barriers to timely and effective pandemic R&D. Not only do these persistent gaps threaten to undo progress achieved through the scientific breakthroughs, but they also exacerbate entrenched inequalities that leave the most vulnerable and disadvantaged people around the globe without access to lifesaving medical countermeasures and essential health services, and perpetuate gross power imbalances between high- and low-income nations. COVID-19 has also unleashed a multitude of actors in pandemic-related R&D across the innovation spectrum and across the globe, underscoring the growing need for more purposeful alignment, coordination, information-sharing, and transparency.

The world urgently needs a fit-for-purpose, proactive, and resilient pandemic R&D ecosystem. There is broad consensus that R&D is a vital component of building a world better equipped to prevent, prepare for, and respond to pandemic threats. Yet new investments in innovation will fail to meet their promise to save lives, prevent future global health emergencies, and build a healthier, safer world for all unless governments, international institutions, and industry are willing to heed the hard lessons of this pandemic and work together to fix these systemic failures and challenges.

Produced by Global Health Technologies Coalition and Pandemic Action Network with contributions by members of the Pandemic Action Network’s Pandemic Preparedness Working Group, this policy brief calls on world leaders to prioritize action in four key areas to close the critical R&D, manufacturing, and delivery gaps necessary to end the acute COVID-19 crisis and build a more resilient, equitable pandemic R&D ecosystem for the future.

Read the full brief here.

The New Year’s Resolution That Matters Most: End the COVID Crisis

As we enter year three of this pandemic, COVID-19 is having a global field day. The virus is taking advantage of our failure as an international community to end this crisis. Cases are once again rising exponentially and hospitals are overflowing. Let us be clear: this is not a health crisis. This is a crisis of leadership and political will.

Yes, world leaders have a lot of competing and compounding crises on their policy plates. Climate change. Addressing inflation, economic instability, and broken supply chains. Cybersecurity. Political instability and conflict. Escalating economic inequality. Raging misinformation and disinformation. The list goes on and on. But as world leaders begin to tackle their own new year’s resolutions, there is one that must rise to the top of their list: End the COVID-19 crisis for everyone, everywhere, once and for all.

It’s tempting given the magnitude of all of these challenges — paired with pandemic fatigue — for political leaders to focus on other issues. That is foolish. There is no pandemic exit strategy for any country without a global strategy. There is no sustained economic recovery without ending this pandemic. There is no prospect of bridging social divides when the pandemic continues to prey on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations. There is no hope of strengthening health systems when we are burning out a generation of health workers. There is no winning when people are dying needlessly every single day.

Every day we let this pandemic continue is a day where we lose the opportunity for meaningful progress on other challenges to humanity.

Here are five things world leaders must-do in 2022 to end the COVID crisis.

1. Make a plan to end this crisis for everyone. It is unfathomable that we still don’t have a global plan of action for this pandemic. We have been calling for this since mid-2020. We call on world leaders to pull together to create a war room, modeled on a Global Health Threats Council suggested by The Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response and backed by the G20 which needs to be truly global. Leaders should craft a plan, define leadership, and execute the plan.

2. Vaccinate the world. High-income countries are attempting to boost their way out of danger while still hoarding vaccine doses. Meanwhile, only 9.5% of people in low-income countries have received at least one dose. And, only one in four healthcare workers in Africa have been fully vaccinated. World leaders: Do whatever it takes to vaccinate the world to 70% by the middle of 2022. Invest in vaccine delivery and education, accelerate promised vaccine dose donations, and swap slots to put low- and middle-income countries at the front of the queue. Publish vaccine contracts, production schedules and pricing to give the public total transparency. “This is within reach, but only if a life in Mumbai matters as much as a life in Brussels, if a life in Sao Paulo matters as much as a life in Geneva, and if a life in Harare matters as much as a life in Washington DC,” said Dr. Ayoade Alakija, WHO Special Envoy for the ACT-Accelerator.

3. Pandemic-proof the planet. Leaders must end this crisis and prevent the next outbreak from turning into a pandemic on a parallel path. We call on world leaders to seize this opportunity to leave a legacy of a healthier and safer world — starting with the establishment and funding of a new global financing mechanism that provides robust and sustained investments in pandemic prevention and preparedness. History has shown that if action is not taken during a crisis, then political will dissipates once the crisis fades from view.

4. Get ahead of the next variant and next disease. What happens when new variants don’t hold up to vaccines or a new disease emerges and we don’t have the research and technology at the ready as we did relative to SARS-CoV-2? We are already experiencing some of this with Omicron — but the next disease could be more deadly. We call on world leaders to make pandemic-related investments a priority now and for the long-term so that every country has a plan, and we can get in front of new variants, diseases, and potential outbreaks. Now is the time to invest in moonshot approaches such as CEPI’s mission to develop pandemic-beating vaccines in 100 days.

5. Elevate pandemic preparedness and response as a leadership priority always. The persistent COVID-19 crisis along with resulting and compounding crises demonstrate that pandemics cut across global economics, personal livelihoods, global security, national security, and individual security. This is a crisis of leadership which demands better and more accountable systems for governing pandemics. It’s time to codify pandemic preparedness and response on leadership agendas at the highest levels. Heed the recommendations of The Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response and establish a high-level Global Health Threats Council.

The year ahead is a tipping point in this crisis. In the cycle of “panic and neglect,” unbelievably we are teetering on neglect. World leaders have done a lot of things to respond to this crisis — denying it, wishing it away, looking around it, pretending it is over or can be managed within their own borders. Why are leaders unable, or unwilling to make the obvious connections?

World leaders: own this resolution. This year, do whatever it takes to end this crisis — and prevent another deadly and costly pandemic from happening again.

Thank You

In this pandemic, when time bends and we forget what day, month, or even year it is, it seems impossible that we are about to enter year three of this devastating global crisis. When this started in early 2020, few of us thought we would still be here after all this time: facing another inequitable pandemic response, the spread of yet another dangerous variant, another surge in cases and deaths, another season of plans on hold, and more uncertainties for the future.

Yet amidst all the darkness, our partnership has been a bright spot. We have joined together in this collective space recognizing that the challenges are too big and too many for any one single stakeholder or sector to tackle alone. Week after week, month after month, together we are continuing to learn, navigate, and — most importantly — act on the twists and turns of this crisis, and hold leaders accountable.

So from our global Pandemic Action Network team
to all of our partners around the world and across sectors, THANK YOU.

Thank you for proactively collaborating to advance critical issues such as vaccine equity, transparency, sustainable financing, governance, and so much more.
Thank you for showing up and rolling up your sleeves to contribute your ideas and energy in our working groups.
Thank you for being generous with your expertise, intelligence, resources, influence, and precious time.

We know that pandemic fatigue has set in and that many organizations and leaders are already turning to other priorities. That makes our collective efforts through this Network even more essential. Our job is to stay in the fight and do whatever it takes to end this crisis around the world and to prevent a deadly and costly pandemic from happening again.

Thank you for staying in the fight with us. And we know it’s critical to make sure we all take a moment to rest and recharge to prepare for the next round. So here’s wishing you and yours a safe, healthy, and joyous holiday season and new year. We look forward to our continued journey together next year, and working to do whatever it takes to end this crisis and prevent the next.

Together, let’s make 2022 the year that we can finally turn the corner on this crisis and lay the foundation for a healthier, safer world.

New Study and Documentary Reveal Grim Pandemic Realities for America’s Doctors and Nurses

Frontline workers say they need more preparation, staff, and PPE and better information and diagnostics

November 18, 2021, Seattle, WA—Today, the Pandemic Action Network released new research findings revealing challenges that continue to burden doctors and nurses in the U.S. well over a year into the COVID-19 pandemic and pointing to what is required to be better prepared for this crisis and future pandemic threats. Notably, access to personal protective equipment (PPE) continues to be a problem — with nearly a third of doctors and nurses saying they did not have sufficient access to PPE, even as recently as summer 2021. Sixty-one percent felt that they did not have sufficient early warning to prepare for the COVID-19 pandemic, and despite best efforts, a third felt it was challenging to follow changing workflows and protocols.

The study, funded by Flu Lab, included a survey conducted by Klick Consulting of 532 doctors and nurses from across the U.S. The survey focused on addressing perceptions of pandemic readiness, knowledge, containment, treatment, and vaccination. Additional qualitative interviews with nearly four dozen health officials, public health workers, doctors, and nurses, revealed a stark reality: while healthcare workers are committed to caring for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, they have faced increased personal risks and an exceptionally high work volume. And they need more support.

Dr. Carrie Tibbles, an ER physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, participated in this research. “Healthcare systems are really stressed right now, and the workforce is tired. Hospitals need support to build back up — and build our workforce back up — so we can take care of our communities,” said Dr. Tibbles. “The pandemic hit us so hard and in Boston, we felt the first wave shortly after New York. We were able to learn in real time from our friends and colleagues in New York and I’m confident we saved many lives as a result. But if we were armed with the tools to be better prepared for pandemics, I know we could do more.”

These stories further come to life in the new documentary, The First Wave, premiering today in New York at the DOC NYC festival and showing in select theaters tomorrow. The film focuses on the doctors, nurses, and patients from one of New York’s hardest-hit hospital systems during the “first wave” from March to June 2020. By laying bare what healthcare workers braved in hospitals flooded with COVID patients, The First Wave honors both their ongoing commitment to their patients, as well as their own personal sacrifice.

“The study results and the harrowing realities presented in The First Wave make one thing clear: we need to listen to doctors and nurses,” said Gabrielle Fitzgerald, co-founder of Pandemic Action Network. “Hailing health workers as heroes is insufficient — we must ensure they have the information and equipment to do their jobs effectively — before, during, and after a crisis.”

Survey participants expressed gratitude for the opportunity to share their perspectives. “Thank you for giving me the opportunity to share my pandemic experience and opinions… It is a rarity that we are asked about our experience,” said one participant. Another shared, “Thanks for working to improve our processes and systems for the next time this happens (hopefully never).”

“Healthcare workers around the country have been stretched to their breaking points countless times over the course of the pandemic. As a group, we have been labeled heroes, but healthcare workers are only human, and resilience is waning in the face of exhaustion and burnout,” said Dr. Kelly C. Sanders, a pediatrician and Pandemic Action Network member. Dr. Sanders also serves as the technical lead for the Pandemic Response Initiative at UCSF and co-authored a case study on the first year of the pandemic in the U.S. “As a country, if we don’t continue to improve frontline conditions, we risk losing desperately needed healthcare workers. We need to improve local vaccination rates, develop new diagnostic and treatment options, and provide more resources for our stressed public health and hospital systems. This is how the American public and decision-makers can show up for the frontline now.”

To respond to the findings of this study, Pandemic Action Network is calling on U.S. policymakers to:

  • Fully resource and accelerate the global COVID-19 response by allocating at least US$17 billion of new funding to assist the world in reaching 70 percent vaccine coverage in every country by the middle of 2022; save lives now through increased access to other lifesaving tools; and prevent future pandemics from occurring. Learn more.
  • Provide ongoing funding for surge capacity and measures that prioritize the safety and security of healthcare workers.
  • Approve the International Pandemic Preparedness and COVID-19 Response Act, in tandem with the Global Health Security Act to strengthen America’s cross-government coordination on pandemic preparedness and response and bolster our support for global preparedness.
  • Approve legislation to strengthen America’s Strategic National Stockpile to ensure adequate PPE and medical supplies for healthcare workers.
  • Approve the Dr. Lorna Breen Health Care Provider Protection Act to reduce and prevent suicide, burnout, and mental and behavioral health conditions among healthcare professionals.
  • Approve a resolution that would designate the first Monday in March as “COVID-19 Victims and Survivors Memorial Day” to memorialize those lost to the COVID-19 virus and recognize the suffering of COVID-19 survivors.

More details of the research and survey results can be found here.

About Pandemic Action Network

Pandemic Action Network drives collective action to end the COVID-19 crisis and to ensure the world is prepared for the next pandemic. The Network is a robust partnership of over 140 global multi-sector organizations aligned in a belief that every effort made in the fight against COVID-19 should leave a long-term legacy. One where humanity is better prepared to deal with outbreaks and prevent a deadly and costly pandemic from happening again.

About Klick Consulting
Klick Consulting solves the problems others can’t by leveraging applied sciences and novel thinking to decode healthcare’s gnarliest challenges. The consultancy embraces science at the speed of business with a specific focus on commercial solutions with real-world applications. With its diverse team of medical, behavioral science, data science, engineering, business model, machine learning, and strategic design experts, the multidisciplinary, collaborative group resolves business problems through a scientific lens. Klick Consulting works with companies across the healthcare spectrum, including consumer wellness, pharmaceutical, device manufacturers, insurers, health systems, and providers.

CONTACT:
Courtney Morris (U.S. west coast)
[email protected]

Jaryd Leady (U.S. east coast)
[email protected]

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Announcing the Pandemic Action Network Ambassadors Program

We all feel it — the widespread desire and urgency to move on from the pandemic that has engulfed our lives for nearly the past two years. But we will only move on when the work is done and the work is far from over. COVID-19 continues to rage around the world and leaders have yet to take the bold actions needed to ensure we are better prepared and protected from future pandemic threats. In the cycle of “panic and neglect,” — defined by initial response to the crisis, but failing to act on long-term lessons and actually change the contributing factors of the crisis — we are teetering on neglect.

Pandemic Action Network was built to ensure that we not only end this crisis for everyone around the world, but to prevent the old cycle of “panic and neglect” from happening again. To achieve these goals, our partnership of over 140 diverse organizations is working to create the ongoing political will needed for action.

Numbers and research insights are helpful, but alone they are not enough to drive leaders to do what must be done to end this crisis and prevent the next pandemic. Leaders need personal reasons to act — they need to hear the personal stories, experiences, and challenges of the ongoing realities of living through this pandemic because, while many want to look at COVID in the rear-view mirror, we know that this crisis is far from over and will persist without action.

That’s why we are launching our new Pandemic Action Network Ambassadors Program.

Pandemic Action Ambassadors come in many forms — those who worked on the frontlines, parents balancing child care alongside their day job, people who have lost loved ones, people who have lost livelihoods, and those who have seen the impact of political inaction. Pandemic Action Ambassadors are people who care, people who are willing to stand up and speak up about the urgency of ending this crisis, building systems at every level to prepare humanity for future health threats, and learning the lessons of this pandemic.

We invite these people to come together and share their personal experiences to help us advance COVID-19 response and pandemic preparedness. Along with a community of other Ambassadors, you will receive monthly emails with small but impactful ways to take action, the opportunity to connect with one another and engage in critical advocacy efforts. The priority application window is open through Tuesday, November 30 at 11:59pm ET. Apply now!

Your story and your voice are key to driving the progress we so desperately need. Together, we have the power to end this crisis and prevent the next pandemic.

Calling on U.S. Secretary of State Blinken and Foreign Ministers to take Concrete Action on COVID-19 Response and Pandemic Preparedness

In an open letter, Pandemic Action Network and nearly 40 international partners call on U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and fellow Foreign Ministers participating in the Nov. 10 Ministerial Meeting to make specific, time-bound commitments and take concrete steps to end the COVID-19 crisis and build back better from this pandemic.

With a focus on the need for a clear roadmap of concrete actions, timelines, and accountability to accelerate progress toward the global targets of vaccinating 70% of the population in every country by mid-2022, expanded delivery of other lifesaving response needs, and strengthened pandemic finance and governance, the letter specifically calls for ministers to:

  1. Divert COVID-19 vaccine production and delivery at scale with full transparency in 2021
  2. Commit to fully finance the global COVID-19 response and to prepare for future pandemic threats
  3. Ramp up and increase transparency of global supply and delivery of vaccines, tests, treatments, oxygen, PPE, and other COVID-19 tools, and strengthen supply chains and pharmacovigilance
  4. Prioritize strengthening country-level distribution and delivery capabilities in a manner that addresses current needs and future health system resilience
  5. Unlock special drawing rights (SDRs) for the global response & recovery
  6. Increase transparency and tracking from inputs to outcomes

The world cannot wait any longer for action to end this pandemic and help prevent the next one. Read the full letter.

Exclusion of Pandemic Financing in the Build Back Better Act Statement from the Global Health Council’s Global Health Security Roundtable Co-Chairs

“We are disheartened that, in the middle of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, one of the compromises made in the agreement on the Build Back Better Act was to cut out financing for future pandemic preparedness. While we welcome the needed US$1.3 billion to support expanded global vaccine production capacity and research on infectious diseases, the bill leaves out critical elements of President Biden’s American Pandemic Preparedness Plan, including the US$600 million requested to stand up a new multilateral fund to bolster global preparedness for future pandemics.

We represent dozens of organizations who have been calling for U.S. global leadership to establish such a fund to address pandemic threats. Establishing this fund is a long overdue step  toward addressing the years of chronic underinvestment that left America and the world vulnerable to COVID-19. There is strong bipartisan support for the fund from both the House and the Senate and from leading global finance and health experts, who have urged that the fund be set up swiftly and capitalized at US$10 billion per year over the next five years. While the US$600 million U.S. contribution to the fund that was included in the Biden Administration’s Pandemic Preparedness Plan represents only a fraction of the global need, it is an urgent first step toward helping prevent another devastating pandemic from happening again.

Omitting this critical funding from the bill will signal a return to complacency in the face of one of the most looming threats to our national and global security. And it will signal to other countries that President Biden’s signature initiative to establish a new fund to fight pandemics  — which he touted to world leaders at the Global COVID-19 Summit just one month ago as a key piece of his plan to Build Back Better — is not backed by any serious financial commitment or urgency from the United States. The White House and Congress should urgently agree to ensure the US$600 million for the multilateral fund is included in the Act before final passage and then urge other countries to join the U.S. and contribute their fair share.”

Bridging the Innovation Gap to Prevent the Next Pandemic — Policy Brief

The world was woefully unprepared to prevent or rapidly respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. This is the result of decades of failure by national and global policymakers to address pandemics as a systemic and growing threat. A glaring weakness is that the ecosystem for pandemic preparedness research and development (R&D) — the system that is meant to develop vaccines, treatments, and other tools for known and unknown health threats — is rife with market and systems failures that prevent it from operating efficiently, effectively, and equitably.

While pandemics can affect the whole world and create large, global markets for vaccines, treatments, and other technologies, those markets have repeatedly failed to respond with the foresight and urgency needed to match the scale, scope, and unpredictability of pandemic threats. The world must urgently address the persistent market and systems failures in the global health R&D ecosystem to prepare for the next pandemic threat.

This policy brief, prepared by Pandemic Action Network, covers the market and systems failures in the pandemic preparedness R&D ecosystem and lays out the unique role that the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) plays in leveraging partnerships and incentives to counter the failures as one key step in building a smarter, more effective and equitable pandemic R&D ecosystem.

Read the policy brief here and the full analysis here.

Statement from the Pandemic Action Network on the Global COVID-19 Summit: Ending the Pandemic and Building Back Better to Prepare for the Next

Pandemic Action Network welcomes the leadership of President Biden and the United States Government in hosting today’s Global COVID-19 Summit. The purpose of today’s event was to secure commitments to take action on the Summit goals and targets. The Network thanks all of the leaders who joined and made commitments to achieve the Summit’s goals to get 70% of the population in every country vaccinated within 12 months, to step up efforts to deliver lifesaving oxygen, therapeutics, tests, and personal protective equipment to patients and health workers on the frontlines of the pandemic, and to scale up investments and strengthen the international system to ensure the world is better prepared to prevent, detect, and respond to future pandemic threats.

Among the new announcements today — that will serve as critical first steps toward the bolder, coordinated global action needed — include: The U.S. pledge to purchase and donate an additional 500 million Pfizer vaccine doses for low- and middle-income countries, bringing the total number of vaccines to be donated globally by the U.S. to 1.1 billion; the establishment of an EU-US task force to work together toward the 70% target, and EU commitment to ensure 1 in 2 doses produced in Europe will be exported to the rest of the world; U.S. commitment of  US$345 million for the global COVID-19 response; U.S. plans to provide US$1 billion to establish a new fund for global health security; and new commitments by philanthropies Skoll Foundation (US$100 million) and Pax Sapiens (US$200 million) to bolster pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response.

Pandemic Action Network co-founder Eloise Todd said:

“The success of this Summit will be judged by what happens next. We urge leaders to use every tool at their disposal to map out where every country is right now, and what finances and logistics are needed to deliver jabs in arms faster, getting us over the line to 70% vaccination coverage in each country, while ensuring access for all for lifesaving tests, treatments, oxygen and PPE along the way. Piecemeal actions are no longer enough. This crisis demands not only commitment, but a coordinated global plan and leadership. To end the COVID-19 crisis in 2022, we need to do whatever it takes — and we will hold leaders to account to make it happen.”

Pandemic Action co-founder Carolyn Reynolds said:

“Today’s Summit was a critical reset of the world’s ambition to end this pandemic for all as quickly as possible, and to start making the necessary investments now to bolster our collective defenses to prevent the next deadly and costly pandemic from happening. But we are in a race against time. There has been a collective failure to date to solve this crisis and treat pandemics as the grave threat they are to global security. We need urgent, bold, and concrete action, and we need it now. We welcome President Biden’s plan to host another summit early next year to make sure the world is on track to achieve the Summit goals and targets. We stand ready to work with all leaders to ensure that this Summit leaves a legacy to pandemic proof the world once and for all.”

In advance of today’s Summit, Pandemic Action Network brought more than 60 groups together around a common position on what’s needed to end this crisis. At today’s Summit, on behalf of our Network, we committed to two things:

1. On the COVID-19 response, we will work with our partners and with leaders to ensure the commitments made today are delivered through a global action plan to do whatever it takes to fully vaccinate 70% of the population in every country in less than 12 months — and at least 40% by the end of this year.

To get there, we must dramatically ramp up support now for vaccine donations, manufacturing, and delivery; development and deployment of testing and treatments, oxygen and PPE; and a strong frontline health workforce to reach the most vulnerable communities.

2. To build back better, we commit to help mobilize the political support and resources necessary to establish a new fund for global health security and a new Global Health Threats Council. We will convene and tap the deep expertise and capabilities in our Network across sectors to inform their design and ensure they are inclusive, accountable, and sustainably funded, commensurate with the threat.

Experts Call on World Leaders to Commit to a Global Plan of Attack on COVID at Summit

More than 60 Leading Organizations across Civil Society, Academia, Philanthropy, Health, and Social Enterprise Define a 6-Point Plan to End the Global COVID-19 Crisis

September 20, 2021, Seattle, WA – This week, hosted by the United States, world leaders will gather virtually for the Global COVID-19 Summit: Ending The Pandemic And Building Back Better. According to a group of experts convened by the Pandemic Action Network, the summit is an opportunity to kickstart a global coordinated response plan. As the pandemic persists and the gap between the vaccine haves and have nots grows larger, the Network and partners from around the world welcomes the summit and the targets defined by the Biden Administration, but warns that without specific, concrete action driven by transparent leadership and accountability, we will see millions more COVID-19 infections, deaths, and chances for virus mutations. The Framework for a Global Action Plan for COVID-19 Response, backed by 61 organizations, outlines a 6-point global plan of attack to deliver on the summit targets.

“We are 18 months into this crisis, and we still don’t have a global plan to address this global pandemic,” said Eloise Todd, co-founder of Pandemic Action Network. “This year’s UN General Assembly and the Biden Administration’s summit must be a step change to how we are tackling this crisis. We need leaders to attend this summit, commit to ensuring that 40% of the world’s population gets vaccinated by the end of the year and 70% by mid-2022. Leaders must roll up their sleeves to take the action needed, delivering all the tests, treatments, PPE, and of course vaccines to achieve this ambition. This pandemic is incubating the next one — it’s time to do whatever it takes to end the COVID crisis for everyone in 2022.”

“The staggering global inequality in vaccine access is costing lives, fracturing the world even more, and compromising global cooperation in all other critical areas such as climate change,” said Pascal Lamy. “Vaccinating the world is a solvable problem. But it will require much stronger coordinated action to correct the course and put us firmly on track to end the devastating effects of the pandemic. We’ve defined what must be done, and we now need leadership and accountability.”

Pascal Lamy is President of the Paris Peace Forum and former director-general of the WTO, and one of the 20 individuals and more than 60 organizations that have signed on to the framework, including Care, the CDC Foundation, the Future Africa Forum, Global Citizen, the International Rescue Committee, ONE, PATH, Sabin Vaccine Institute, Save the Children, the United Nations Foundation, VillageReach, and Women in Global Health as well as the Paris Peace Forum.

In order to end the COVID-19 crisis and prepare for the next, Pandemic Action Network, COVID Collaborative, multiple centers at Duke University, and more than 60 global partners are calling on world leaders to:

  1. Strengthen global leadership and accountability. Strong, sustained political leadership and accountability is needed to coordinate and galvanize the many existing multilateral and bilateral responses.
  2. Develop and implement a Global COVID-19 Response Roadmap. Leaders should develop and agree to an end-to-end, fully costed roadmap to end the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, which should include specific, timebound commitments and steps.
  3. Empower a Global Task Force for Supply Chain and Manufacturing. This Task Force should be part of the global leadership framework and should expand production of vaccine inputs, vaccines, diagnostics, therapeutics, and other life-saving interventions.
  4. Accelerate sharing of vaccines and other life-saving interventions.
  5. Prioritize strengthening country-level distribution and delivery capabilities. Recognizing that country-level distribution, delivery, and demand-generation are quickly becoming the key constraints in the race between vaccines and variants.
  6. Increase multi-year financing for the pandemic response and preparedness in low- and middle-income countries. Funding must be additional and must match the scope and urgency of the COVID-19 response and close critical global gaps in pandemic preparedness.

 

“We are in a race against time. The world has the resources and the ingenuity to end the COVID-19 crisis, but we need leaders to step up to meet the moment with the urgency that it deserves,” said Gary Edson, president of the COVID Collaborative.

“This is about leadership and accountability. If the global COVID-19 response remains rudderless and fragmented, without real levers for accountability, all well-meaning commitments will have little impact,” added Krishna Udayakumar, founding director of the Duke Global Health Innovation Center.

The full framework with a 6-point action plan is available here.

About Pandemic Action Network

Pandemic Action Network drives collective action to end the COVID-19 crisis and to ensure the world is prepared for the next pandemic. The Network is a robust partnership of over 140 global multi-sector organizations aligned in a belief that every effort made in the fight against COVID-19 should leave a long-term legacy. One where humanity is better prepared to deal with outbreaks and prevent a deadly and costly pandemic from happening again. Learn more at: pandemicactionnetwork.org.

About Paris Peace Forum

For the fourth consecutive year, the Paris Peace Forum brings together the most important players in collective intelligence. Heads of state and government and CEOs of major multinationals, as well as several civil society actors, will gather for a unique hybrid edition from November 11 to 13 to advance concrete solutions to the enormous challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, and to improve global governance post COVID.

About COVID Collaborative

The COVID Collaborative is a national assembly of experts, leaders and institutions in health, education, and the economy and associations representing the diversity of the country to turn the tide on the pandemic by supporting global, federal, state, and local COVID-19 response efforts. COVID Collaborative includes expertise from across Republican and Democratic administrations at the federal, state and local levels, including former FDA commissioners, CDC directors, and U.S. surgeon generals; former U.S. secretaries of Education, Homeland Security, Defense and Health and Human Services; leading public health experts and institutions that span the country; leading business groups and CEOs; groups representing historically excluded populations; major global philanthropies; and associations representing those on the frontlines of public health and education.

About Duke Global Health Innovation Center, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, Duke Global Health Institute

The Duke Global Health Innovation Center, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, and Duke Global Health Institute work cooperatively to synthesize research on global and public health and advance evidence-based policies that support strong public health systems at all levels of government. Work on this initiative represents the individual expertise of the researchers involved and not necessarily the views of the administration of Duke University.

Do Whatever It Takes! Making the COVID-19 Summit a Step Change in Global Response

Pandemic Action Network is relentlessly focused on ending the COVID-19 crisis everywhere and preventing the next pandemic. We work with our global network of more than 140 partners to push governments to bridge the divide between rhetoric or piecemeal efforts and meaningful actions. When we first learned about the prospect of a global COVID-19 Response Summit — something we have been calling for over the past 18 months — we set out to define the step change in ambition that leaders would need to take after the devastatingly inadequate action taken to tackle this pandemic crisis to date.

That’s why in advance of this Summit, we worked with our partners at the COVID Collaborative and across multiple centers at Duke University to bring more than 60 organizations together around a common position on what’s needed to end this crisis. We’re pleased to see much of what we have been calling for reflected in the Summit targets, which we support. But this Summit has to set itself apart by being the starting point in a much longer journey.

It’s beyond time for an action plan, leadership, and accountability. The world is divided between the haves and the have nots like never before. Those with access to COVID-19 vaccines, and those with no access in sight. We have to change this, and at the 22 September COVID-19 Summit, leaders must pledge to do whatever it takes to fully vaccinate 70% of the population in every country in less than 12 months. We will be tracking their progress towards that commitment and the interim target of at least 40% by the end of 2021.

To get there, we must dramatically ramp up support NOW for:

  • Vaccine donations, queue swaps, manufacturing, and delivery
  • Development and deployment of testing and treatments — including oxygen — and PPE
  • A strong frontline health workforce to reach the most vulnerable communities

We make our own commitment to deliver. We will continue to help mobilize the political support and resources necessary to deliver the targets, and track progress of countries towards their goals. We will also push the private sector and philanthropic donors to play their part in delivering the funding — and the policies — to achieve global vaccination and delivery of COVID-19 tools. We will convene and tap the deep expertise and capabilities in our Network across sectors to inform their design and ensure they are inclusive, accountable, sustainably funded, and commensurate with the threat.

It’s time to shine a light on the problems in the system, and fix them, before they take more lives. We are in a race against time. The world has the resources and the ingenuity to solve these challenges.

It’s a matter of leadership and political will. We will be working to ensure that this Summit leaves a legacy to end this crisis and pandemic-proof the world once and for all.

Read and share the full Framework for a Global Action Plan for COVID-19 Response endorsed by more than 60 partners here.

Addressing Market Failures: The Role of CEPI in Bridging the Innovation Gap to Prevent the Next Pandemic

The global response to COVID-19 not only shows that the world was ill-prepared to prevent and respond to a pandemic caused by a novel respiratory pathogen, but also that there are an array of system and market failures in global health research and development (R&D). Solving for these failures ― and building a ready and sustainable R&D ecosystem for pandemic preparedness ― will be critical to advancing global health security and preventing future infectious disease outbreaks from becoming the next deadly and costly pandemic.

Addressing Market Failures: The Role of CEPI in Bridging the Innovation Gap to Prevent the Next Pandemic, produced by Volta Capital, Pandemic Action Network, and the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (ACDC), examines global health R&D failures to help inform policy and funding decisions to bolster preparedness and response for emerging pandemic threats. In particular, the paper considers the unique role of CEPI in addressing some of these failures, its strengths and challenges in the COVID-19 response, and the role it can play through its new strategy to bolster future epidemic and pandemic preparedness.

Key findings of the paper include:

  • Longstanding and persistent market and systems failures in global health R&D, especially for vaccines against novel pathogens, have left the world at grave risk of deadly and costly pandemics.
  • The world cannot wait for the next pandemic to bolster investments in R&D and preparedness for emerging infectious disease threats.
  • CEPI has a key role to play in a better prepared global R&D ecosystem.

To learn more, read the full analysis Addressing Market Failures: The Role of CEPI in Bridging the Innovation Gap to Prevent the Next Pandemic and the accompanying policy brief.

Share the key messages using our social media toolkit.

G20 health Ministers’ Meeting — What Happened? What’s Next?

DESPITE PROMISING STATEMENTS OF COOPERATION, VERY LITTLE WAS AGREED UPON DURING THE G20 HEALTH MINISTERS’ MEETING AND WHAT COMES NEXT TO TURN COMMITMENTS INTO ACTION REMAINS UNCLEAR. 

In advance of the two-day gathering of Health Ministers from the Group of Twenty (G20) in Rome, Italy’s health minister Roberto Speranza, holding the G20 presidency this year, said the event was an occasion to strengthen international relations and work for fairer COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

While the G20 Health Ministers’ declaration contains encouraging messages of strong multilateral cooperation to end the pandemic and enhance timely, equitable, and global access to safe, affordable, and effective COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostics, very little was agreed in terms of concrete steps needed to turn these promises into a reality.

Here are some of our main take-aways:

“Pact” on achieving vaccine equity

Countries committed themselves in the so-called “Rome Pact” to providing the entire world population with access to COVID-19 vaccines. Speaking after the meeting, Italian Health Minister Speranza told journalists, “if we leave part of the world without vaccines, we risk new variants which will hurt all of us.” He promised that efforts would be strengthened bilaterally and through international platforms starting from COVAX.

We welcome the Ministers’ commitment to continue their efforts to meet the World Health Organization’s (WHO) goal to vaccinate at least 40% of the world’s population by the end of 2021 and continue to support collaborative initiatives, such as the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and COVAX as well as important global research and innovation initiatives as the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI). We still have a long way to go — the WHO Director-General has said that while 5 billion vaccines have been administered worldwide, almost 75 percent of these doses have been administered in just 10 countries.

Most high-income countries have bought significantly more doses than needed to cover domestic vaccination needs. We need these countries to donate at least 1 billion vaccine doses as soon as possible, and 2 billion doses by the end of 2021, if this goal is to be achieved. We welcome Germany’s announcement on the sidelines of the meeting to make 100 million vaccine doses available for the international inoculation campaign before the end of the year, and call on others to swiftly follow suit.

Financing for pandemic preparedness and response

According to the Health Ministers’ declaration, proposals on sustainable financing to strengthen future pandemic preparedness and response are being drafted to be presented at the G20 Joint Finance and Health Ministers’ meeting in October. Immediate and multi-year funding commitments for the pandemic response in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) must match the scope and urgency of the need. We must urgently establish a financing mechanism to channel and direct the additional funding required for the current pandemic response to where it is most needed, and to jumpstart funding for preparedness for emerging pandemic threats. Read more on the call for a new global financing mechanism that provides robust and sustained investments in pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response in this policy brief.

One Health approach

On a positive note, there was agreement on adopting a ‘One Health’ approach in responding to future health emergencies, i.e., recognizing that human, animal, and environmental health are interlinked and determinant of our wellbeing. According to the Ministers’ declaration, the WHO, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and UN Environment Programme (UNEP) are to work on a joint work plan on ‘One Health’ to improve prevention, monitoring, detection, control, and containment of zoonotic disease outbreaks.

Vaccine education

There is an abundance of great research, information, and approaches to vaccine education, yet efforts to address vaccine hesitancy and build vaccine confidence can be fragmented and siloed. Catalyzing vaccine confidence requires action across the world by diverse stakeholders, active inclusion, and feedback loops with local implementers. Therefore we welcome the ministerial declaration’s emphasis on the need to promote vaccine confidence “by implementing the most effective, culturally appropriate, and science-based public communication and listening strategies tailored to the context of communities at the local level, to combating misinformation and disinformation, and instilling trust in public institutions and experts.”

Implications for the G20 Leaders’ Summit

The G20 Health Ministers’ meeting was one of the last G20 ministerial gatherings before the Leaders’ Summit in Rome on 30 and 31 October. We urgently need strengthened global leadership and accountability; and expect the next joint Health and Finance ministerial and the G20 Leaders’ Summit at the end of October to produce solid commitments on the following issues:

  1. Building strong political leadership for the global COVID-19 response by setting out a fully-costed Global COVID-19 Response Roadmap with specific time-bound commitments to help drive us to the end of the pandemic — full details are defined in our Framework for a Global Action Plan for COVID-19 Response;
  2. Sharing doses at scale and donating entire production slots where feasible, to accelerate global immunity, starting with the donation of excess doses as soon as possible;
  3. Delivering meaningful finance at scale to tackle the global pandemic, including looking to free up as much as possible of the IMF’s US$650B in Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) to low-income countries and to contribute to funding the global COVID-19 response.

We wholeheartedly agree with Minister Speranza when he calls the vaccine a ‘key to freedom’. But we urgently need leaders to focus on ensuring that this ‘key’ is accessible to everyone, not only those in G20 countries.

African Health Ministers’ Path Ahead — A Slow but Steady Fight Against COVID-19

By Nahashon Aluoka, Regional Advisor, East & Southern Africa, Pandemic Action 

Amidst Africa’s persistent third wave of COVID-19, the 71st session of the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Committee for Africa gathered Ministers of Health and leaders from across the continent. The message coming from WHO’s decision-making body was clear: solidarity is required to address COVID-19 in a region that has also been under the stranglehold of more than 50 different public health emergencies in the WHO reporting period.   

In a special session on COVID-19 response, a status report on vaccine rollout and uptake was presented, and Ministers exchanged ideas on approaches to tackle the pandemic and the post-COVID-19 recovery. Vaccines and rollout were top-of-mind. There is slow but steady progress in acquisition and deployment of vaccines. So far, more than 129 million doses have been received in the continent through multiple platforms and more than 93 million doses have been administered. 

However, the response to this crisis is beleaguered with various challenges and leaders clearly laid them on the table. These include: 

  • The magnitude of the crisis requires multi-sectoral coordination at the country level. Ministers noted that the involvement of the private sector, civil society and communities could be improved. 
  • Fragile health systems are stretched and lack adequate funding to properly respond to COVID-19 let alone other health challenges.
  • In many countries, there are also challenges of non-compliance to public health measures, i.e., mask-wearing, physical distancing, and handwashing, and low levels of vaccine confidence continues to be fueled by virulent misinformation. 
  • Weak planning and inadequate resourcing for vaccine deployment. Two countries have yet to begin vaccine rollout and inconsistent supply has resulted in uneven rollouts across the continent.


Priorities Ahead
Calls for a comprehensive and costed global action plan to vaccinate the world continue, but they have yet to be heeded. 

African leaders must continue to work in solidarity starting with a focus on planning for and effectively managing vaccine delivery. So much attention is paid to vaccine procurement but similar attention must be put on ensuring that countries and communities are ready for vaccine delivery.  

Now that the vaccine pipeline from multiple sources — including COVAX and the path-breaking efforts of the Africa Vaccine Acquisition Task Team (AVATT) has increased vaccine volumes into the continent, all efforts should be made to ensure vaccines are equitably deployed and that there is zero wastage. 

With the limited availability of vaccines and the fact that vaccines don’t work alone in containing the pandemic, member states need to increase investment in creating awareness and promoting compliance to public health measures that stop the spread of COVID-19. Such campaigns must address the contextual aspects of their populations and be voiced by trusted sources on trusted channels.

Importantly, African member states must work together through the African Union to transform the current political will to develop local manufacturing capacities for vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics on the continent into a solid action plan. This pandemic has made it clear that the continent’s health security cannot, and should never, be anchored on global solidarity and goodwill and that Africa must define a new public health order driven by its regional and national institutions

 

Framework for a Global Action Plan for COVID-19 Response

We are at an exceedingly perilous and urgent moment in the COVID-19 pandemic. As the Delta variant has demonstrated, we are fighting a virus that doesn’t respect borders and rapidly advances across continents. If the virus continues to circulate unchecked in large parts of the world, we will see not only many more millions of infections and deaths, but also new variants that could totally pierce vaccine immunity, returning the world to square one. The global COVID-19 crisis demands leadership and a global plan of attack. A coordinated, global response, the only possible successful response to the pandemic, must be grounded in equity at all levels – global, regional, national, subnational and community. An “all hands on deck” crisis response must deploy all available resources and capabilities – multilateral and bilateral, public and private sector. A robust and effective response to the current crisis is also the best foundation for health systems strengthening and future pandemic preparedness. World leaders should therefore urgently convene a “Global Pandemic Response and Vaccination Summit” and commit to urgent actions detailed in our Framework For a Global Action Plan for COVID-19 Response. Read more here.

An “all hands on deck” crisis response must deploy all available resources and capabilities – multilateral and bilateral, public and private sector. A robust and effective response to the current crisis is also the best foundation for health systems.

Calling for a New Multilateral Financing Mechanism for Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness

People and countries around the world continue to suffer from the devastating human, economic, and social costs of being unprepared for a deadly pandemic like COVID-19. This crisis is a call-to-action. World leaders must seize this opportunity to leave a legacy of a healthier and safer world — starting with a new global financing mechanism that provides robust and sustained investments in pandemic prevention and preparedness. At the 2021 United Nations General Assembly, world leaders should launch a 100-day action plan to establish and resource a new financing mechanism, or Fund, that can mobilize at least US$10 billion annually over the next five years to bolster global health security and pandemic preparedness. History has shown time and again that if action is not taken during a crisis, then political will dissipates once the crisis fades from view. An expedited timeline for establishing the Fund will provide a critical new tool for the ongoing COVID-19 response efforts and create continuity between the pandemic response and recovery activities while bridging to escalated and sustained efforts on pandemic preparedness.  This policy brief, prepared by contributors from the Center for Global Development, Pandemic Action Network, and Nuclear Threat Initiative, is intended to inform and guide ongoing conversations among governments and non-governmental stakeholders on the parameters and design of the new Fund and action plan. Read the policy brief here.
This policy brief, prepared by contributors from the Center for Global Development, Pandemic Action Network, and Nuclear Threat Initiative, is intended to inform and guide ongoing conversations among governments and non-governmental stakeholders on the parameters and design of the new Fund and action plan.

UN General Assembly Called Upon to Lead Global Pandemic Prevention and Preparedness

Civil society leaders urge UN General Assembly President Volkan Bozkir to use the informal plenary on July 28 to formally start the process for a UN High-Level Summit on Global Health Security and Pandemic Prevention and Preparedness during the 76th session of the General Assembly.

Your Excellency,  

On behalf of the Pandemic Action Network and our partners around the world, we welcome the announcement of an informal plenary of the General Assembly on 28 July to discuss what the world needs to do to prevent and prepare for future pandemics, informed by the findings and recommendations of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (IPPPR) and other review efforts. The devastating health, economic, and social impacts of this deadly, costly, and protracted global crisis underscore that it is well past time for the community of nations to prioritize and prepare for pandemics as the existential, catastrophic, and growing global security  threats they are. We urge you to ensure that the outcome of this plenary is a commitment to a concrete, time-bound political process for international action on pandemic prevention and preparedness. 

Specifically, we urge you to use the 28 July 2021 informal meeting to kick off a formal process and set a date during the 76th session of the General Assembly — ideally within the first six months or no later than September 2022 — for a UN High-Level Summit on Global Health Security and Pandemic Prevention and Preparedness at the Heads of State or Government level. The Summit should agree to a Political Declaration or similar, which outlines a set of concrete solutions, backed by the requisite financing, institutional, and policy reforms, and member state commitments, that will ensure an international system better prepared to detect, prevent, and respond to pandemic threats. Given the whole of society nature of  pandemics, it will be essential that the Summit fully and actively engage leaders of multilateral institutions, civil society organizations, private sector, foundations, academic, and research institutions alongside government leaders. 

The proposals from the IPPPR, the G20 High-Level Independent Panel on Financing the Global Commons for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (G20), the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB), our Network, and others have been based on robust evidence, deep consultation, thorough analysis, and active debate before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a striking convergence of recommendations around the global financing, governance, and accountability reforms that are urgently needed; what has been sorely lacking is political will to act.  

While accelerating the global COVID-19 response remains the most urgent priority, we cannot afford to wait until this pandemic is over to begin to bolster our collective defenses against emerging pandemic threats. Now is the time to lay the foundation for a resilient international system that can act quickly and equitably to prevent a health emergency of this scale from occurring in the future. Too often, political will for system change recedes as a crisis wanes. World leaders must seize this opportunity to commit to pandemic-proof the future and leave a legacy of a healthier and safer world. 

Pandemic Action Network and our partners stand ready to work with you to support this process. Thank you for your urgent attention to this matter, and we look forward to your reply.  

Sincerely, 

Carolyn Reynolds 
Co-founder
Pandemic Action Network  

On behalf of:

 

If your organization would like to sign on, please email Hanna Hwang

Your Pandemic Story Matters — Apply for a Pandemic Storytelling Workshop with The Moth

We’ve learned many things during the pandemic, but one is the importance of storytelling and consistent messaging. A compelling story can move people to action, while disinformation can put people’s lives at risk. This means that honing our individual ability to deliver a message can actually help end this pandemic and better prepare for, or even prevent, the next.

But, are we equipped to tell stories that will move decisionmakers to action? As policymakers and advocates respond and analyze the impact of the pandemic, we often talk about big metrics — GDP and job loss numbers — but those analyses fail to account for the individual, social, and economic impact of this global crisis.

Now is the time to sharpen our storytelling skills and amplify community-level experiences and lessons learned. The Moth, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Pandemic Action Network, are holding three free-of-charge virtual storytelling workshops to amplify community-level stories from the pandemic’s frontlines. 

If you have a passion for storytelling that can make a difference and a frontline experience from the COVID-19 pandemic, we invite you to learn more and apply.

Please note that the deadline application has passed. To stay in the loop for more opportunities this like this, sign up for our Pandemic Action Playbook. 

World Leaders: It is Time for New Global Funding to Keep the World Safer from Pandemics

By Amanda Glassman, Executive Vice President of Center for Global Development, CEO of CGD Europe, and Senior Fellow, and Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founder, Pandemic Action Network

This past weekend, the High-Level Independent Panel on Financing the Global Commons for Pandemic Preparedness and Response delivered a stark warning in its report to the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors meeting in Venice: With the near certainty of an even more deadly and costly pandemic than COVID-19 occurring within the next decade, the clock is ticking to ramp up investments in international preparedness. A central feature of the Panel’s recommendations: Create a Global Health Threats Fund that can provide at least US$10 billion annually to international institutions and to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) governments, among others, to bolster the world’s capacity to prevent, detect, and rapidly respond to pandemics.

The investment case for pandemic preparedness could hardly be more compelling. At an unfathomable loss of more than 4 million lives and nearly US$20 trillion and counting, the human and economic costs of COVID-19 will be felt for a generation. And as the Panel concludes in its report, the next pandemic could be much, much worse.

In their communiqué, the G20 finance leaders “welcomed” the Panel’s report and agreed to form a task force to discuss the proposals and report out to G20 heads of state at their summit in October. Last month, G7 leaders also said they would “explore options for building consensus” around sustainable global health and health security financing.

______________

It is time to move beyond the talk and commit to an action plan
to establish and robustly finance a new Fund by the end of the year.
______________

Our message to all these leaders: It is time to move beyond the talk and commit to an action plan to establish and robustly finance a new Fund by the end of the year. This will provide a powerful engine to help LMICs and partner agencies at regional and international levels put an end to the current pandemic and lay the foundation to prepare, if not prevent, the next one.

There has been plenty of talk already. The Panel’s call for a new Fund emerged from hundreds of hours of discussions with governments and non-governmental organizations and from dozens of expert reports and analyses on what the world needs to do to be better prepared for pandemic threats, including many written well before COVID-19. It builds on the call in May by another independent panel to create an International Pandemic Financing Facility, which in turn builds on the March 2020 proposal by the Center for Global Development, the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Georgetown University and the Nuclear Threat Initiative for a Global Health Security Challenge Fund that has been championed by a wide array of partners through the Pandemic Action Network. The Global Preparedness Monitoring Board has repeatedly stressed the need for sustainable preparedness financing and the U.S. Congress has also weighed in.

We know what needs to be done. COVID-19 has shown us that pandemics are complex and sometimes unpredictable health, humanitarian, economic, and national security crises that require a multi-sectoral, whole-of-government, and global response. But we can contain or even prevent potential pandemics at their source — and thus dramatically reduce their human and economic costs — with investments in three priority global public goods where there are acute health security gaps.

  • First, we must build a strong and reliable domestic and international surveillance and data networks for early detection of emerging pathogens with pandemic potential, including zoonotic spillovers. 

 

  • Second, we should ensure that every country, regardless of income, has achieved a minimum level of pandemic readiness, including a trained frontline health workforce and infrastructure capable of effective infection prevention and control and stress-tested systems that can stop outbreaks from spreading. 

 

  • Third, we must accelerate the development, ever-ready manufacturing, global delivery, and universal access of medical countermeasures and supplies like vaccines, diagnostics, therapeutics, personal protective equipment, oxygen, and other lifesaving tools to ensure rapid responses to preclude severe shortages anywhere and avoid prolonging a pandemic everywhere. 

 

Predictable, long-term financing for the World Health Organization (WHO) is essential to help bring these three priorities together.

The need for additional financing for preparedness is most acute in the poorest countries with the weakest health systems, which have been further battered by COVID-19. Many of these countries are now experiencing a deadly third wave of this pandemic as thus far they have only been able to secure and deliver enough vaccines to cover a tiny percentage of their populations, and their medium-term economic and health financing outlook is poor. Catalytic external financing thus becomes even more important, as most of these governments will continue to have limited fiscal space for the foreseeable future and few incentives to prioritize domestic investments in pandemic preparedness over other pressing development needs. Even middle-income countries face high opportunity costs in the use of very scarce public resources and systematically underinvest in preparedness. And one country’s outbreak, if not controlled, can quickly become everyone’s pandemic.

To address these challenges, the Fund should be structured to meet five imperatives:

  • Additional, sustainable funding for prevention and preparedness. The Fund’s primary purpose must be to address the long-neglected global “crisis of preparedness” and create a robust multilateral source of financing to help LMICs and regional and global systems rapidly strengthen their frontline capacity to detect, prevent, and respond to emerging pandemic threats. This isn’t meant to be a global fund for all things health; it’s a global fund for health security to address a strategic gap in the global health architecture to prevent and prepare for emerging pandemic threats. Recent estimates of the annual costs of global preparedness from Georgetown University, McKinsey, and WHO (each using different parameters) range from US$5 billion to about US$25 billion over the next five years. Weighing the evidence, the G20 Panel thus determined that a minimum of US$10 billion in annual financing should be channeled through the new Fund, and that this must be additional to existing investments in other global health priorities. Like traditional military readiness, pandemic preparedness also requires sustained investment over time against both known and unknown threats.

 

  • Country prioritization and ownership. One of the Fund’s top priorities should be to support LMICs to develop and implement National Health Security Action Plans to meet international surveillance and preparedness standards. Funding should incentivize countries to commit a growing share of their domestic budgets for preparedness by linking new grant financing to increased domestic resources as countries’ economies and fiscal space grows (hence our original “challenge fund” concept). As a benchmark, the Panel found that LMICs will need to increase their domestic budgets for health by at least one percent of GDP on average over the next five years. The Fund should aim to leverage as much on-budget financing for surveillance, preparedness, and response as possible, enabling country government oversight and accountability structures to function.

 

  • Global burden sharing for a global public good. Pandemic preparedness is a global public good, so every country should contribute its fair share to help build a better prepared global system based on their ability to pay. Because pandemics pose a threat not only to health but also to economic and national security, governments should tap into other budgets beyond simply overseas development assistance. Following the September 11, 2001 attacks, the U.S. government enacted a special security fee for airline tickets which generated US$4 billion in 2017 alone. We need similar out-of-the-ordinary resource mobilization solutions to bolster pandemic readiness. It’s not only the public sector that should bear the cost, as every sector of society stands to benefit from a reduction in pandemic risk. The Fund should incorporate a financing model that can also mobilize philanthropy and leverage private capital (the latter for manufacturing efforts, for example). Amazon founder Jeff Bezos recently pledged US$10 billion to set up an Earth Fund to address climate challenges. Where is the corresponding pledge to tackle the global threat of pandemics (from which Amazon and many other technology firms have reaped record financial gains)?

 

  • Financing for results. The Fund should work or merge with existing international initiatives such as the Global Health Security Agenda and create incentives for country government progress towards minimum preparedness thresholds, building on empirical data and drawing from the strengthened surveillance systems that the Fund will support. These thresholds should be based on widely agreed measurement indicators and frameworks including the WHO’s Monitoring and Evaluation Framework (to include Joint External Evaluations, States Parties Annual Report information, and other data) combined with other external measures such as the Global Health Security Index. While none of these measures were adequate when it came to predicting countries’ capacity to effectively contain COVID-19, the perfect shouldn’t be the enemy of the good, and work is already underway to look at how these measures can be strengthened in the wake of COVID-19. In general, it will be important to shift from process indicators of preparedness (such as a committee or a protocol) to performance indicators (such as the proposed 7-1-7 goal or the proposal for measures of completeness, accuracy, timeliness, and openness of mortality and disease surveillance data). In those fragile and conflict-affected states where the government cannot operate effectively, the Fund should enable international agencies and local non-governmental organizations to conduct surveillance and report on results.Another key element will be to make the Fund more than just a Fund: it should become a global hub for catalytic financing, technical assistance, and best practices that will spur the domestic planning and managerial capacities, surveillance quality, and accountability necessary to drive a “global race to the top” that will elevate and sustain political support for pandemic prevention and preparedness.

 

  • Transparent and accountable governance: Given the proposed Fund’s magnitude of US$10 billion annually and the need for pooled funding for the global public good of prevention and preparedness, its governance should be overseen by a board which will determine priorities and gaps for financing in consultation with the WHO and other international agencies and have the flexibility to re-allocate if needed to respond to novel pathogens and specific circumstances. The Fund should also operate under a strong transparency and accountability framework and be informed by the knowledge and perspectives of civil society and community-based organizations and the private sector, who are vital partners in effective pandemic preparedness and response.

 

The Panel’s proposal structures the new Fund as a Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF). FIF arrangements can vary. In the lightest touch version of a FIF, the World Bank only performs the treasury functions and acts as trustee, similar to the role it plays for international funding entities like the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the Green Climate Fund, and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), to name a few. Entities like the Global Environment Facility, the Global Partnership for Education, and the Climate Investment Funds are also FIFs with separate boards and procedures, but their Secretariats are hosted at World Bank headquarters and can leverage the Bank’s balance sheet and utilize its human resource and procurement processes. And other FIFs are more closely linked to the Bank’s operations and management structure, such as the Global Agricultural and Food Security Program (which sits in the Bank’s Agriculture global practice).

Of these options, the Panel proposed the creation of a new FIF modeled on the arrangements of the Global Environment Facility (GEF). The Panel reasoned that the scale of the resources required, the need for a single pool of funding that could allocate funds across governments, international agencies, and other entities, the need to work across sectors to achieve One Health goals, and the benefits of linking to World Bank, IFC or other MDB lending justified this choice. A new pandemic preparedness fund modeled on GEF would also represent a parallel to how the Bank and its member countries deal with climate change, another global public goods challenge. While there will be some transaction costs to set up the new Fund, the Panel concluded that retrofitting existing funding mechanisms would be an even more difficult and lengthy process than building an entity fit-for-purpose for pandemic preparedness. That said, financing should be deployed through existing institutions to the extent possible, and there are fund design and use options that can build into existing global and regional structures to minimize additional bureaucracy or novel procedures that would burden partners.

Some argue that mobilizing new investments for pandemic preparedness risks diverting or leaving underfunded the fight against COVID-19 or other existing infectious disease threats. This must not — and need not — happen. The world has more than enough resources to tackle these challenges simultaneously; it is a question of political will and leadership. We believe setting up a new Fund can be a triple win: For example, enhanced investments in disease surveillance and mortality registration, supply chains and delivery systems should help accelerate the COVID-19 response, deliver better results for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, polio, and other diseases, and get the world ready for the next deadly pathogen with pandemic potential.

COVID-19 is far from over around the world, and urgently requires a much more muscular global response with than we have seen to date. We must redouble efforts on an array of global health goals, where progress has been seriously disrupted by this pandemic. But the growing frequency of pandemics also means the world cannot afford to wait to mount the next major initiative to confront an existential crisis: the crisis of pandemic preparedness. We must be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. So it is time for world leaders to stop discussing and start acting. Set up the Fund now. Let’s end this pandemic and help prevent the next one.


Amanda Glassman is Executive Vice President of the Center for Global Development and CEO of CGD Europe, and she was co-lead of the project team for the High-Level Independent Panel on Financing the Global Commons for Pandemic Preparedness and Response. Carolyn Reynolds is co-founder of the Pandemic Action Network, a senior associate at the CSIS Global Health Policy Center and an adviser to the CGD project team. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Panel.

Wearing A Mask Still Matters: The World Rallies to Continue Masking to Stop the Spread of COVID-19

World Mask Week (July 12-18) is a global movement to encourage continued mask-wearing to reach the end of the COVID-19 pandemic

July 12, 2021, Seattle, WA—Pandemic Action Network, the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC), the African Union, 3M and over 50 global, regional, and local partner organizations announced today the launch of World Mask Week 2021 (July 12-18) — a global campaign underlining a universal truth: masking in public, in combination with handwashing and physical distancing, is still one of the best ways we can protect ourselves and others against COVID-19, especially our most vulnerable community members as countries race to vaccinate their populations.

According to WHO, 2021 is already a deadlier year in the pandemic than 2020. Today, we are seeing a two-track pandemic emerge: some regions are up against the spread of variants and rising case numbers, while others with access to vaccines are lifting masking and other public health restrictions.

“Everyone who has worn a mask in public has helped slow the spread of COVID-19,” said Deputy Director of the Africa CDC, Dr. Ahmed Ogwell Ouma. “As the pandemic continues to spread and access to vaccines has been slow across much of Africa, we must fight against pandemic fatigue and continue to do what we can to keep everyone safe.”

The campaign encourages people and organizations around the world to rally behind the continued importance of wearing a mask. People will be asked to show their support by sharing a statement on social media with #WorldMaskWeek, and a picture, or video with their favorite mask, tagging others with the message of “Thanks For Masking”.

“The pandemic is not over. We should rightly recognize and encourage our progress, but we must also put our expertise to work and stay vigilant in fighting the pandemic,” said Dr. Denise Rutherford, Senior Vice President and Chief Corporate Affairs Officer, 3M. “3M and our team members will continue to do our part. We are proud to participate in World Mask Week because when you wear a mask, you are helping protect the most vulnerable. To all who are doing their part to stop the spread of COVID-19, we thank you.”

Face coverings block the spray of droplets from sneezing, coughing, talking, singing, or shouting when worn over the mouth and nose. Consistent mask-wearing can also reduce the spread of the virus among people who are infected with COVID-19, but do not have symptoms, or are unaware they have it. While a COVID-19 vaccine will prevent serious illness and death, the extent to which it keeps people from being infected and passing the virus on to others is still emerging.

“Last year, with the first World Mask Week, we sparked a global movement in 117 countries to wear masks. This year, as the pandemic persists in much of the world, we’re coming together around the message that masking still matters and to show gratitude for those who have worn a mask and continue to mask up,” said Eloise Todd, Co-Founder of the Network. “In order to end this pandemic for everyone, we must deploy all the tools available around the world to fight COVID-19 – and that includes mask-wearing.” To mark the urgency of this moment, Pandemic Action Network has released a Why Masking Still Matters policy brief including key messaging and recommendations for governments, businesses, and individuals.

Pandemic Action Network was launched in April 2020 to drive collective action to help bring an end to COVID-19 and to ensure the world is prepared for the next pandemic. Since launching, the Network has been working with influencers to promote mask-wearing, along with physical distancing and handwashing. World Mask Week provides the opportunity for global unity around a single message: Let’s keep masking — not just for ourselves, but for our families, our communities, those who are most vulnerable, and the world.

For more information about World Mask Week, please visit worldmaskweek.com.

About Pandemic Action Network
Pandemic Action Network drives collective action to bring an end to COVID-19 and to ensure the world is prepared for the next pandemic. The Network consists of more than 100 global multi-sector partners, working both publicly and behind the scenes to inform policy, mobilize public support and resources, and catalyze action in areas of acute need. Partners are aligned in a belief that every effort made in the fight against COVID-19 should leave a longer-term legacy that better prepares humanity to deal with outbreaks and help prevent another deadly and costly pandemic from happening again. Learn more at: pandemicactionnetwork.org.

About the African Union
The African Union leads Africa’s development and integration in close collaboration with African Union Member States, the regional economic communities and African citizens. The vision of the African Union is to accelerate progress towards an integrated, prosperous and inclusive Africa, at peace with itself, playing a dynamic role in the continental and global arena, effectively driven by an accountable, efficient and responsive Commission. Learn more at: au.int/en.

About the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention
Africa CDC is a specialized technical institution of the African Union that strengthens the capacity and capability of Africa’s public health institutions as well as partnerships to detect and respond quickly and effectively to disease threats and outbreaks, based on data-driven interventions and programs. Learn more at: africacdc.org.

About 3M
At 3M, we apply science in collaborative ways to improve lives daily as our employees connect with customers all around the world. Learn more about 3M’s creative solutions to global challenges at: 3M.com or on Twitter @3M or @3MNews.

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G20 Finance Ministers Urged to Fill the Huge Gaps Left by the G7 on Finance and Vaccines

Dear G20 Finance Ministers,

The G7 collectively, and most countries individually, have so far failed to absorb the necessity of collective global action and investment. We cannot afford to continue with the piecemeal approach that has characterized the global response until now. We are therefore writing to you in advance of your G20 Finance Ministerial meeting so that by 9-10 July you can take actions that will: fill the gaps left by the G7 on urgent dose-sharing, increase transparency to facilitate efficient tracking and accountability in this crisis, and come up with credible financing to back the emerging plan from Kristalina Georgieva to vaccinate the world.

Firstly, on dose sharing, the G7 pledge to share 870 million doses over the next year is far from the quantity requested by the WHO and lacks solidarity given the third wave that is building momentum in many under-vaccinated regions. Dose-sharing is urgently needed, not as a long-term solution, but to plug the immediate vaccine supply gap in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We need G20 countries to fill COVAX’s gap for this summer. The majority of the dose-sharing announced at the G7 Summit will not be delivered till well into 2022. Therefore, we call on you not to let the meeting finish before the G20 have collectively found the doses needed to fill COVAX’s supply shortage — 275 million doses for June alone — and we are reiterating the call for 1 billion doses to be shared by the end of August 2021.

Secondly, we need bolder agreements for the medium term and absolute transparency on vaccine supply. In order to shine a light on what is going wrong in vaccine supply and create better understanding of the system, as well as sharing doses now to fill the COVAX supply gap, we also ask that you:

– plan to share at least 1 billion doses by the end of August and at least 2 billion doses by the end of the year, which must be counted as an addition to current ODA levels and global development priorities;

– clearly commit to share all of your excess doses by Q1 2022; and,

– publish a detailed month-by-month timeline to the end of 2022 of doses promised and doses actually delivered and publish the prices the G20 and COVAX have paid for doses.

We know that G7 countries alone have bought three billion more doses than they need to fully vaccinate their entire population to 70%, but the G7 pledge provided only enough doses to vaccinate 10.3% of the population in LMICs. Since we sent these letters to each of you individually, head of the WTO Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala called for the G20 to give 3bn doses when they meet – this is exactly the kind of ambition and action we need right now to get this response on track.

Thirdly, it is vital that Finance Ministers commit to backing a fully-costed, coordinated, and comprehensive Global Roadmap to Vaccinate the World covering end-to-end finance for vaccines, tests, treatments and PPE, dose donations, and tech and patent policies. Kristalina Georgieva has committed to developing a roadmap — we want to see the G20 Finance Ministers commit to financing such a roadmap. Latest estimates anticipate that it will cost at least US$50-66B simply to provide doses to vaccinate the world. We want a comprehensive plan that covers tests, treatments, PPE, and vaccines — as well as covering end-to-end delivery costs so that vaccines and other COVID-19 tools are not left on the tarmac and can be delivered. This will require innovative solutions using Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) in the medium term but also scaling grant funding now. We welcome the G7’s recent commitment to reallocate their new SDRs to the poorest and most vulnerable countries struggling to tackle COVID-19, health systems, hunger, education, and economic fallout of the pandemic. We now urge the G20 to reallocate most, if not all, of their new SDRs to vulnerable countries by the end of the year, to support health and climate in particular, and an equitable and green recovery, and ask that countries publicly share how much they will contribute to this goal.

We can no longer afford to wait to take concrete action to end COVID-19, and we hope the G20 can deliver the leadership the world needs. We are counting on you to take immediate action to fill the vaccine gap now and to fund the plan to vaccinate the world.

Vaccine policy is economic policy, and until countries are vaccinated to at least 70%, all other COVID-19 tools — tests, treatments, PPE, and the ability to deliver all tools — are an integral part of the vaccination strategy. We are counting on you to fill the dose gap, deliver the COVID-19 tools we need, and find the funding so we can stop the spread and save lives. We are counting on you and your fellow Ministers to take the urgent steps needed now to help protect us all. We would welcome the opportunity to discuss these issues with you in the coming days, at your convenience.

Many thanks for your urgent attention to these matters, and we look forward to hearing from you.

Your sincerely,


PATH
 
 

Statement on the Introduction of New U.S. Senate Legislation on International Pandemic Preparedness and COVID-19 Response

Pandemic Action Network welcomes the bipartisan introduction of the International Pandemic Preparedness and COVID-19 Response Act of 2021 (S. 2297) in the U.S. Senate. This bill represents a critical coming together across party lines to step up U.S. global leadership both on the global COVID-19 response and on preparedness to create a world that is better equipped to detect, prevent, and respond to emerging pandemic threats.

“Pandemic Action Network and our more than 120 partners in the United States and around the globe applaud the bipartisan leadership of Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Menendez and Ranking Member Risch to introduce this urgently needed legislation to bolster U.S. global leadership in the COVID-19 response and to help ensure that the world is better organized, better resourced, and better prepared to halt future pandemics,” said Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founder, Pandemic Action Network. “America will not be safe from COVID-19 or the next deadly and costly global health threat until everyone around the world is safe ― and the next pandemic will not wait. The Menendez-Risch bill rightly sets pandemic preparedness as a top priority for our national and global security.”

As introduced, S.2297 would strengthen the U.S response to the global COVID-19 pandemic to bring an end to this global health and economic crisis. The legislation heeds Pandemic Action Network’s call for a global vaccine roadmap and requires a detailed strategy to accelerate global vaccine distribution for countries most in need. The bill also directs the Biden Administration to work with international partners to establish a new Fund for Global Health Security, which will significantly bolster public and private investments to help low-and-middle-income countries close critical gaps in pandemic prevention, detection, and response. The Fund embraces the calls by the Pandemic Action Network for the establishment of a new, enduring, and catalytic international financing mechanism, and the Network is pleased to see strong alignment to prioritize pandemic financing across the Administration, U.S. House of Representatives, the G20, and now the U.S. Senate bill. The Network is also pleased that the bill seeks to elevate leadership and coordination for international pandemic preparedness activities within the U.S. Government and authorizes U.S. participation in, and funding for, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), a global initiative to develop new vaccines for epidemic and pandemic threats, including COVID-19 variants.

“This new Senate legislation is an important step to address the longstanding underinvestment in public health systems and pandemic preparedness that allowed COVID-19 to spiral into a global crisis that continues to devastate people around the world,” Reynolds said. “Congress and the Executive Branch must act without delay to ramp up investments to strengthen the  national and global defenses necessary to pandemic proof the planet, commensurate with this growing threat. We have no time to waste.”

 

Lots of Warm Words, Barely No Action — Is the G7 Still Relevant?

By Isabelle De Lichtervelde, Senior Program Officer, Policy & Advocacy

Last week, I wrote about our hopes and asks for the G7 Leaders’ Summit. At their annual gathering, G7 leaders faced two choices: they could either decide to take the fight against COVID-19 to another level and agree on a comprehensive global plan to end the pandemic everywhere for everyone or choose to continue with the piecemeal approach that has characterized the global response until now. Distracted by domestic issues, such as Brexit, they sadly went for the latter. The G7 communiqué contains a lot of warm words such as “a collective goal of ending the pandemic in 2022” and a commitment to both “strengthen global action now to fight COVID-19, and to take further tangible steps to improve our collective defenses against future threats and to bolster global health and health security”, but very little action to turn these statements into reality.

Here are some of our main take-aways (for a line-by-line emoji-based assessment of the health and development portions of the communiqué, click here):

  • On dose sharing, with the exception of the U.S. pledge to purchase 500 million Pfizer doses, the collective level of ambition failed to meet the urgency of the moment. G7 leaders committed “to share at least 870 million doses directly over the next year” and to “make these doses available as soon as possible and aim to deliver at least half by the end of 2021 primarily channelled through COVAX towards those in greatest need”. This is far from enough. Dose-sharing is urgently needed NOW, not as a long-term solution, but to plug the significant vaccine supply gap in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) caused by rich countries massively overbuying doses. Our ask is one billion doses by the end of August and at least two billion doses by the end of 2021. According to publicly-available data, G7 countries have bought three billion more doses than they need to fully vaccinate their entire population to 70%. On top of that, the pharma company’s own data shows that there will be 5 billion doses in circulation by the end of August and a staggering 11 billion doses by the end of the year. Yet, G7 leaders have only agreed to share 870 million doses over the next 12 months. According to a new analysis, this will provide only enough doses to vaccinate 10.3% of the population in LMICs.
  • While COVID is still raging, particularly in countries in need, the G7 didn’t make any new financial commitments to end COVID globally. ACT-A is still facing a US$18.1Bn funding gap and the latest estimates anticipate that it will cost at least US$50-66B to fully vaccinate the world — and likely much more when end-to-end delivery costs are factored in. Yet G7 leaders simply claimed pledges made in the past, without any concrete action to finance a global roadmap to end the pandemic in the coming months.
  • On a slightly more positive note, the G7 supported the extension of ACT-A and increased transparency on procurement and delivery data for both donor and recipient countries. The communiqué reads “efforts on this scale require close monitoring of progress made by ACT-A with reliable, transparent, up-to-date and clear information on procurement and delivery to both donor and recipient countries in close partnership with regional organizations. Progress should be reported to the G20 in Rome.” We need total transparency around vaccine production in order for the world to be able to get COVID-19 under control — see our transparency guidelines here. The Network will follow this important issue and continue to push for progress at the G20 meeting later this year.
  • On pandemic preparedness, the G7 outcome document is full of positive language but very little action, including around financing mechanisms for pandemic preparedness. The G7 committed to “explore options for building consensus this year, around sustainable global health and health security financing, supported by robust financial reporting, increased and defined accountability, and oversight”, — a potentially positive baby step toward having a catalytic, sustainable, and multilateral financing mechanism that is dedicated to promoting pandemic preparedness and prevention.


To quote the Network’s co-founder, Eloise Todd, “in footballing terms, the G7 had the ball in front of the net, open goal, and they skied it.” The consequence of this disappointing G7 Summit will be a prolonged pandemic, with more lives lost around the globe.

When will someone finally demonstrate the political leadership needed to end this pandemic?

Call-to-Action: Global Roadmap To Vaccinate The World

There is currently no plan to get to global herd immunity, needlessly leaving the world vulnerable to case resurgence and the proliferation of variants. We are calling on leaders to agree to a Global Vaccine Roadmap to achieve global herd immunity as soon as possible (at least 70%, more if the evolving science points to the need for further coverage). This Roadmap should:

  1. Set out a comprehensive, coordinated strategy to get to global herd immunity as soon as possible.
  2. Increase and improve the global supply of all COVID tools through investment, policies, and the redistribution of excess doses.
  3. Fully cost the response, agree to a burden-sharing model, and begin to plug the gap by fully funding the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A).

Most existing funds are mainly focused on procurement, yet multiple analyses show that it will take hundreds of billions of dollars on top of procurement financing to fully deliver a global response. If successful, ACT-A, for example, will provide vaccines for 27% of low- and middle-income (LMIC) populations in 2021 on current financing levels — but ACT-A finance does not cover rollout costs from “tarmac to arm” of its own vaccines. The situation in India also underscores the importance of oxygen and other tools that are needed before herd immunity is reached. We need a fully-funded, holistic response. We are therefore calling on leaders to:

Set out a comprehensive, coordinated strategy, as has been called for by the IMF, World Bank, WHO, and WTO, to get to global herd immunity as soon as possible, which:

  • Gives countries the support they need so that all efforts to deliver the global response are mapped, efforts are mutually-reinforced, duplication can be avoided and critical gaps can be identified and filled.
  • Delivers a comprehensive costing and analysis covering all elements of a global response to establish what is already covered and identify gaps in supply, procurement, and resources needed in-country for the delivery of vaccines, tests, and treatments.

Increase and improve the global supply of all COVID-19 tools through investment, policies and the redistribution of excess doses.

  • Scale up the production of tests, treatments, and health commodities, including oxygen, and accelerate LMIC-led research and development (R&D) through fully-funded diagnostics and therapeutics pillars.
  • Increase vaccine manufacturing through investments in regional capacity and back policies to increase knowledge sharing, remove trade-related barriers, and create tech transfer hubs.
  • Ensure vaccines are offered at an affordable price and on a not-for-profit basis.
  • Prioritize dose-sharing. G7 leaders should pledge 2 billion doses at the Leaders’ Summit, delivering 1 billion by the end of August and the second billion by the end of 2021 and as part of this delivery, ensure that 250 million additional people in low-income countries (LICs) and LMICs have actually received their doses by the end of August in parallel with national vaccine rollout plans.

Fully cost the response, agree to a burden sharing model, and begin to plug the gap by fully funding the ACT-A.

  • Agree to a burden-sharing model to set out fair share contributions and fully funding ACT-A.
  • Leverage funding opportunities by identifying new funding streams to protect official development assistance (ODA).
  • Fully fund global vaccination to reach 70% coverage, requiring at least US$50B according to IMF estimates, with more in grants needed to enable LMICs to cover the full costs of delivery.
  • Work with countries to urgently cost all delivery needs outside of ACT-A’s mandate so vaccines and other tools can be distributed and administered, including the costs of frontline and community health workers.

Three key deliverables for the G7: leadership, supply, and finance 

G7 leaders must:

1. Develop a Global Roadmap to Vaccinate the World: 

  • Develop a comprehensive, coordinated strategy that plugs gaps and shines a light on the blind spots of current efforts, including delivery of tools to low-resource settings.
  • This Global Roadmap should be kicked off at the G7 Summit and delivered with full costings and logistical, human, and financial resource needs by the end of June at the latest, when other costings will also be available to inform the roadmap.
  • There are growing calls for leaders to step up and set out the plan that is designed to bring the acute phase of the pandemic to an end and vaccinate the world. As well as the proposal from the IMF, World Bank, WHO, and WTO, the Spanish Government has set out a ‘Vaccines for All’ plan, more voices in the U.S. are calling on the Biden Administration to show leadership, and in the vacuum left by the lack of a truly global response, other organizations are stepping up to offer policy prescriptions for a global plan. The report of the Independent Panel on Pandemic Preparedness and Response also recognized the lack of global coordination and political leadership during this pandemic and called for a Global Health Threats Council to be formed.
  • The G7 must not delay in corralling leaders to deliver a Global Roadmap. The UK Presidency is well placed to work hand in glove with the G20 to deliver a comprehensive roadmap that plans to vaccinate at least 70% of people in the world and provides the support needed for every country to get the vaccine delivered and administered safely to 70% of each country’s population.


2. Increase the supply of vaccines available globally by: 

  • Prioritizing dose-sharing. The G7 should pledge 2 billion doses at the Leaders’ Summit, delivering 1 billion by the end of August and the second billion by the end of 2021 and as part of this delivery, ensure at least 250 million additional people in LICs and LMICs have actually received their doses by the end of August. Without dose-sharing, G7 countries would have enough supply to vaccinate to share over 3 billion excess doses even after vaccinating 70% of their own populations.
  • Scaling global capacity to produce COVID-19 vaccines by the end of 2021 through investments in regional capacity, backing policies to increase knowledge sharing, removing trade-related barriers, and creating tech transfer hubs.
  • Buying vaccine supply for COVAX and other mechanisms to help reach 70% coverage.


3. Fully finance the global response to COVID-19 by: 

  • Fully funding global vaccination to reach 70% coverage, requiring at least US$50B according to IMF estimates, with more in grants needed to enable LMICs to cover the full costs of delivery, on the basis of a clear burden-sharing agreement, which will:
    1. Fill the immediate ACT-A funding gap of US$19B.
    2. Commit in principle to fund the global roadmap to get to 70% global coverage on the basis of a clear burden-sharing agreement, finding new resources and protecting existing ODA.
    3. Leverage multilateral development banks (MDBs) to help finance the global roadmap.
  • Ensuring the costs needed to administer vaccines — including to health systems and health workers, including frontline and community health workers — are also met, so that vaccines are not just available but also administered, as part of a fully-costed global plan to reach global herd immunity.
  • Costing and then mobilizing the additional finance needed to deliver this plan to vaccinate the world, using all possible finance tools to raise the amounts necessary, including, but not limited to, SDRs, funds from MDBs, and new sources of funding, including innovative mechanisms and providing finance beyond government funding.

 

                           PATH                 

 

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Seizing the “Chernobyl Moment”: Actioning the Independent Panel’s Report Over the Next 100 Days to Make This the Last Pandemic

Last week’s release of the report by the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response’s (Independent Panel): COVID-19: Make it the Last Pandemic comes at arguably one of the most complex and challenging times in the global COVID-19 crisis.

Just as many states and businesses across the U.S. quickly lifted mask-wearing restrictions in response to new guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and countries across the world lifted restrictions, the world continues to see record numbers of new COVID-19 cases. World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Dr. Tedros warned of the grave emergency in India and the worsening situation in countries such as Nepal, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and Egypt that are dealing with spikes in cases and hospitalizations. Nearly 18 months since the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus was first reported, the global inequities in the response are sharper than ever. Only 0.3% of COVID-19 vaccine supply is going to low-income countries, and the world still lacks the necessary life-saving supplies and systems necessary to contain, let alone end, this pandemic.

It is amidst this backdrop that the Independent Panel is sounding the alarm for world leaders to take urgent action, both to ratchet up the global COVID-19 response as well as to make the significant changes to the international system necessary to bolster global preparedness for future pandemic threats. While we think the Independent’s Panel’s recommendations could have been much more ambitious in certain areas, if enacted they would constitute a major step change in how pandemics are treated by governments as an existential global security threat.  The Independent Panel calls COVID-19 a “Chernobyl moment” for pandemic preparedness: the catastrophe that should trigger the kinds of international policies, systemic reforms, safeguards, and accountability for addressing pandemics that Chernobyl triggered for nuclear threats.

IF ENACTED. This is the key point. We have seen this story play out before — the cycle of panic and neglect characterized by a deadly disease outbreak, followed by urgent crisis response, systemic review, reports, and recommendations that leaders fail to implement. Over the next 100 days, in advance of the next UN General Assembly, we must begin to break this deadly cycle once and for all.       

________________________

“Everything that has been accomplished by this commission is really a prelude. It’s the overture to the opera that we have not yet heard. We don’t really know yet how well these tasks will be taken up and these recommendations acted upon … It’s been shown over time that it’s not enough to lay out what the world should do. It’s going to require continued promotion, advocacy, and monitoring.”
Harvey Fineberg, President, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
________________________

In April, Pandemic Action Network’s 100+ partners developed our 2021 Action Agenda to urge world leaders to take action to bolster the global COVID-19 response, hasten an end to this global crisis, and lay the groundwork for a more pandemic-proof world. Last week, we gathered global experts for an examination of the Independent Panel’s findings (view here, passcode: &DuB+G9^) and the verdict was clear: We must lay out the path and the timeline and take immediate action to carry these recommendations forward. Now, on the heels of the Independent Panel’s Report, we call on world leaders to take the following actions within the next 100 days to help end this pandemic and prevent the next.

1. Agree on the plan and secure the resources necessary for the global COVID-19 response and reach at least 70 percent vaccine coverage as quickly as possible.

While global action lags and virus variants continue to spread, the devastating human, social, and economic consequences of the pandemic will only continue to worsen and prolong our ability to reach global herd immunity and bring an end to the acute crisis.

The Independent Panel report urges countries that have bought more vaccines than they need to begin sharing doses immediately through the COVAX facility — with the goal of 1 billion doses by September and 2 billion by mid-2022. We believe we must go further and faster. We urge world leaders to apply the same ingenuity, political will, and public-private partnerships that brought us these novel vaccines in record time to speed up both the global production and the delivery of vaccines — and reach the goal of 2 billion vaccines shared through COVAX to people in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) before the end of this calendar year.

World leaders also should adopt, rigorously cost, and fund a global vaccine roadmap to reach at least 70% vaccine coverage around the world as soon as possible. Recent cost estimates vary widely, from at least $60 billion to an estimate of $190 billion for the costs of delivery to the last mile — and the real costs are likely to be much higher. Given the lack of previous investments in preparedness, the havoc the pandemic has wreaked on already under-resourced health systems, and the continuing global shortages of oxygen, personal protective equipment, diagnostics, therapeutics and other life-saving supplies, a full costing of the global COVID-19 response is likely to be much higher. But even a doubling the higher-end estimates would still be a fraction of what governments have spent so far on response and stimulus measures or the projected $22 trillion in losses to the global economy from the pandemic over the next five years.

________________________

“The world must step up in its ambition and its collective efforts to solve the crisis as soon as possible. It’s unfortunate that 18 months after the start of this pandemic the Panel still felt the need to call for the global roadmap to end this pandemic.”
Muhammad Pate, Global Director, Health, Nutrition, and Population, World Bank,
and Director, Global Financing Facility
________________________

2. Build and commit the resources to launch a new and enduring multilateral financing mechanism for pandemic preparedness.  

The Independent Panel’s recommendation to create an International Pandemic Financing Facility embraces earlier calls by the Pandemic Action Network and others for a new multilateral funding mechanism to bolster pandemic preparedness. The Panel’s proposed facility would mobilize an additional US$5-10 billion annually over the next 10-15 years for pandemic preparedness and be able to disburse rapid-surge financing for response of $50-100 billion at short notice to help stop an emerging pandemic threat. Based on the experience of this pandemic, these funding targets, especially for preparedness, will likely need to increase.

World leaders should commit to launch and fund a new financing mechanism that is fit-for-purpose, based on more rigorous cost estimates of what is required to get the world better prepared, and ensure that its resources are not only additional to current global health spending but also that the preparedness funds are protected in the event of a crisis. This should not just be about business as usual or mobilizing more money for all things health: A new facility should be catalytic; incentivize countries to prioritize development, budgeting, and implementation of their national health security action plans; and hold them to account. Launching this mechanism should not wait until this pandemic is over.

________________________

We must, we absolutely must use this window to focus on tangible actions this year. To build the tools for the future we need, for financing, surge capacity, manufacturing triggers, for oversight. We don’t want to miss this opportunity.”
Beth Cameron, Senior Director for Global Health Security and Biodefense, National Security Council, White House
________________________


3. Elevate pandemic preparedness and response to the highest levels of political leadership, including adopting a global implementation plan and establishing a high-level oversight body with the mandate to prepare for and respond to pandemic threats.

To solve for the egregious lack of decisive leadership and clear accountability for the global COVID-19 response and for pandemic preparedness, the Independent Panel calls for world leaders to take several actions this year: establish a Global Health Threats Council made up of heads of state and government, adopt a political declaration at a Special Session of the United National General Assembly, and adopt a Pandemic Framework Convention. Taken together, these steps would ensure this agenda gets the high-level and sustained political attention and support it demands, and which has been lacking for far too long. A Global Threats Council model is not only something the world needs to prevent and prepare for future pandemics, but a model that we need now to coordinate and action key priorities to end this pandemic. World leaders should embark on those negotiations now and a high-level oversight body should be set up to steer these efforts forward. Simultaneously, world leaders should forge a robust political declaration for adoption at UNGA that will be more than words and not just a one-off event. The Special Session should set in motion a global plan to implement the full range of the Panel’s recommendations to get the world better prepared before the next pandemic strikes, and every head of state or government should lay out what they will do in support.

________________________

“One way to get countries to do more is to have them held accountable by their citizens … Civil society needs to be brought into the decision making processes [for pandemic preparedness], to hold governments accountable for action.”
— Rosemarie Muganda, Regional Advocacy Director for Africa, PATH
________________________

4. Create meaningful and sustained mechanisms to engage civil society as critical partners for driving system change and accountability.

The Independent Panel report underscores that COVID-19 is so much more than a public health crisis; it’s a profound socio-economic crisis, whose impacts will be felt by the poorest and most vulnerable for years, perhaps decades, to come. The longer the pandemic persists, the more the inequities in our systems are amplified and deepened.

As countries, companies, and communities emerge from the acute crisis of the pandemic, they have a responsibility to step up and help close these global gaps, and ensure that this does not happen again. Leaders, at every level — national, regional, global — should take steps to ensure that civil society organizations have a seat at the table as they build and adapt their response and preparedness plans, to ensure those plans reflect the needs of their communities, and to empower citizens to hold their political leaders to account for enacting the fundamental changes needed for a more resilient world.

Pandemic Action Network is laser-focused to seize this window to take action and we are relentless in our advocacy because we believe that we can and must pandemic-proof our present and our future. Together, our 100+ partners urge world leaders — at the G7, G20 and other global summits — to recognize that right now, they have one job: end this pandemic and ensure we are prepared for the next.

 

Pandemic Action Network Statement on the Report of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response: Make It the Last Pandemic

Pandemic Action Network welcomes the long-awaited report from the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (The Independent Panel): COVID-19: Make it the Last Pandemic, which assesses the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic and recommends steps world leaders should take to end this pandemic and prevent another deadly and costly pandemic from ever happening again. 

Pandemic Action Network co-founder Carolyn Reynolds said, “The Independent Panel’s report affirms what Pandemic Action Network has long stressed: That despite repeated warnings over many years, the world was woefully unprepared to mobilize with the urgency, speed, and scale required to prevent an emerging infectious disease outbreak from escalating into a devastating and costly pandemic, whose health and socio-economic impacts will be felt for years, if not decades. As the Independent Panel rightly notes, COVID-19 was a preventable disaster — one that continues to prey on the most vulnerable and marginalized populations in countries at all levels of income.  

“The Independent Panel’s urgent calls on wealthy nations to supply at least 1 billion vaccines to low- and middle-income countries by September, fund the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A), accelerate technology transfer and remove trade-related barriers are imperative, together with the call for the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop a roadmap with clear goals, targets, and milestones for ending the pandemic. Sadly, the fact that these recommendations are needed nearly 18 months into the crisis — and when the last week marked the highest number of COVID-19 cases the world has recorded to date — speaks volumes about the failures of the global response.  

“Yet as we continue to battle this pandemic, we cannot afford to ignore the next one. We commend the Independent Panel for keeping a clear eye on the future. Many of the Panel’s recommendations reflect the priorities we have set out in our 2021 Agenda for Action, including to: elevate global and national leadership on pandemic preparedness and response; increase investments in preparedness and surge capacity through a new international financing facility;  strengthen the WHO; create a rapid global surveillance and alert system; and ensure a pre-negotiated global mechanism for rapid development and equitable supply of lifesaving tools and technologies. We also support the Panel’s call for a UN Special Summit this fall at which heads of state will commit to action. 

“Most of the Independent Panel’s recommendations are not novel, and they will not solve all the weaknesses exposed by this pandemic. But they provide a starting point both to accelerate the end of this crisis and build a better prepared world. At upcoming global summits, world leaders must take steps to address pandemics as the grave and existential threat to humanity that they are. Too many times in the past, recommendations on pandemic preparedness have faded once the immediate crisis has waned. We owe it to the 3.3 million people who have lost their lives and the brave heroes of this pandemic — the frontline health and essential workers, the epidemiologists, the researchers, the educators, the community activists — not to let that happen again. We want to see a step change in the ambition of world leaders to end this pandemic and pandemic-proof our future and we hope the Independent Panel’s report will be the catalyst for that change.”

Pandemic Action Network Honored Among Fast Company’s 2021 World Changing Ideas

In one year, Pandemic Action Network has come together as a bold catalytic coalition of more than 100 global multi-sector partners to inspire a change in the world, knowing that no single stakeholder can tackle pandemic preparedness or response alone. 

We are proud that Pandemic Action Network has been honored as a part of Fast Company’s 2021 World Changing Ideas because changing the world is precisely the point of our collective efforts. 

World Changing Ideas is an annual social good awards program that elevates innovative projects and concepts that are tackling the world’s biggest challenges, from solving health crises and social injustice to economic inequality and more. Now in its fifth year, the awards have showcased ideas dedicated to making the world a better place.

Last year, COVID-19 shocked the world into awareness that we are not prepared for pandemics. This deadly, costly crisis — which has impacted every country around the globe — has also created a political opportunity for global action — a window that will close as the pandemic fades. 

Our Network is seizing this opportunity for action. We believe that every effort we make in the fight against COVID-19 should leave a longer-term legacy that better prepares humanity to deal with outbreaks and help prevent another deadly and costly pandemic from ever happening again. We know that the challenges are too big and too many for any one single stakeholder or sector, but our experience during our first year of collective action has proven the power of unlocking our Network model time and again.

As we navigate the second year of this pandemic, the work of our Network has only begun and is more urgent than ever. The current crisis in India and the spread of more infectious variants show that we are in a race against time and that the gravity of the challenge demands a step change in the ambition of world leaders. Together, Pandemic Action Network is catalyzing solutions, amplifying opportunities for action, and accelerating an equitable response to this pandemic while seizing every opportunity to put pandemic prevention and preparedness on the agenda so that we can create a pandemic-proof world for future generations.

The First 100 Days of the Biden Presidency: A Pandemic Progress Report

Carolyn Reynolds, Co-founder & Courtney Carson, Senior Program Officer, Pandemic Action Network

The COVID-19 pandemic has overshadowed almost every aspect of President Biden’s first 100 days in office. During the transition, the Pandemic Action Network and leading global health experts called on then-President-elect Biden to take bold steps and work with Congress and with world leaders to end the pandemic as soon as possible and ensure we are better prepared for the next one.

So how has the Biden-Harris Administration done so far, and what remains to be done?

Prioritizing the threat: Right out of the gate, President Biden made a series of welcome announcements to prioritize pandemic response both at home and abroad.  

 

These early announcements included reversing the politically-motivated decision last year to initiate U.S. withdrawal from the World Health Organization (WHO). Instead the Biden-Harris Administration has leaned in to bolster the WHO and the international response to this crisis. Notably, Vice President Kamala Harris’s first conversation as VP with a global leader was with WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros.

COVID-19 response: President Biden has shown leadership by wearing a mask consistently in public, and by issuing a universal mask mandate for all federal buildings, public transportation, and transportation hubs. This cemented the science-backed recommendation that wearing a mask is a key preventative measure. In addition, his first major legislative package, the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), provided urgently needed relief to families, states, and communities grappling with the economic, social, and health impacts of COVID-19, and  accelerated the frontline pandemic response both at home and abroad. Despite some early challenges, the domestic vaccine rollout has accelerated in Biden’s first 100 days, with 235 million vaccines administered and 98 million people fully vaccinated as of today, according to the CDC. Despite these efforts, vaccination rates are now slowing — a worrying trend as vaccines skepticism grows across the U.S.

On the global response front, the Biden Administration has also taken some important steps, namely to commit a total of $7.5 billion to date to the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) partnership and its COVAX financing facility to ramp up access to vaccines and other lifesaving tools around the world. As a result, the U.S. is now the leading donor to this global solidarity effort. Highlighting its commitment to the global response, the U.S. hosted international leaders to kick off a virtual resource mobilization campaign for COVAX, urging other wealthy nations to contribute. It also announced agreements to loan vaccine doses to Canada and Mexico, and to provide relief and vaccine donations to India, including mobilizing the U.S. military to provide emergency aid in the face of the country’s growing COVID-19 crisis.  

Pandemic preparedness: U.S. leadership is also needed to strengthen systems for pandemic preparedness, at home and abroad. Pandemic Action Network continues to urge President Biden and other world leaders to lay the groundwork for a pandemic-proof America and world now — before the pandemic fades from view and political and public attention shifts to other priorities, as it has too many times before.  

Here again, the Biden-Harris Administration has laid down some important early markers. First at home: The American Jobs Plan includes a serious commitment of $30 billion to bolster prevent future pandemics and protect against a range of biological threats. This represents renewed and increased commitment to bolstering research and development, surveillance, and strategic stockpiles to ensure America is ready to respond to future disease threats. 

On the global front, President Biden is leading a push for new sustainable financing to help all countries be prepared to counter pandemic threats. Pandemic Action Network is pleased that in NSM1 and several follow-on announcements, the Biden-Harris Administration has expressed its intent to heed our call to establish an enduring international catalytic financing mechanism for preparedness, with the aim to ensure that every country has the core capacity it needs to detect, prevent, and respond to outbreaks at their source before they become deadly and costly pandemics like COVID-19. Earlier this week, Vice President Harris urged representatives at the United Nations to work together now to prepare for the next pandemic. The Administration’s initial budget proposal for FY22 released April 9 backs up these pledges with a $1 billion increase in funding for global health security. 

Looking Ahead: This progress in President Biden’s first 100 days is a welcome start. But much more must be done, and urgently — as the pandemic continues to rage around the world and as the next pandemic threat is looming. Pandemic Action Network has issued an Agenda for Action for world leaders. U.S. support will be critical to drive progress in all of these areas, but here are three where the Biden-Harris Administration can and should lead the way now:

  • Expanded global vaccine access is vital to ending this pandemic. According to the Launch and Scale Faster initiative at Duke University, the U.S. has secured at least 500 million more doses than it needs to vaccinate every American, while some of the poorest nations have yet to receive a single dose. Given U.S. success in vaccination — and the threat to the U.S. of the continued spread of COVID-19 and its variants in other parts of the globe — the Biden-Harris Administration should lead the way to immediately share more excess doses with the world through COVAX. In his first address to Congress, President Biden committed to sharing vaccines with the world once the U.S. has amassed additional supply and when all Americans have access to COVID-19 vaccine. We are there, and we will not end this pandemic if we continue to allow other countries to go unserved. And President Biden should also work with world leaders to agree on a Global COVID-19 Vaccine Roadmap to reach at least 70% global vaccine coverage as soon as possible. 
  • Mobilize additional domestic and international funding for preparedness on par with the threat. To this end, we urge the U.S. to build on its commitment to establish a global financing mechanism for pandemic preparedness with a pledge of at least $2 billion to start, and call on other G7 and G20 member countries to join the U.S. and invest in this effort toward an initial capitalization of $20 billion this year. Separately, the U.S. should also commit a multi-year pledge toward fully funding the five-year plan of action for the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI). CEPI is playing a critical role in accelerating global access to vaccines in this crisis, and has set a bold goal to compress the future timeline to develop new vaccines for emerging pandemic threats so that they can be quickly developed, tested, and rolled out in an emergency. This is the kind of ambition the world needs, and the U.S. must do its fair share to advance this global public good.  
  • Fix the global pandemic defense system. While new and dedicated funding for preparedness is absolutely critical, it’s not the only piece of the puzzle. The COVID-19 crisis has shown that we must strengthen our international instruments of leadership and accountability to ensure both better preparedness and more rapid response to potential pandemics. This includes strengthening our existing global mechanisms such as the WHO and International Health Regulations, but also seriously entertaining bold and new modalities and frameworks for pandemic governance, such as the proposal for a new pandemic treaty, which now has the backing of dozens of other world leaders. President Biden convened world leaders last week on climate change to push for bold solutions; pandemic threats deserve the same level of political priority.

 

The next few months will see a series of global summits and convenings, offering world leaders multiple opportunities to seize the moment and take action. Pandemic Action Network urges President Biden and his Administration to seize these opportunities, doubling down on the progress of the first 100 days and going bigger and bolder on ending this pandemic and preventing the next. While progress since January 20 has been meaningful, the costs of the U.S. and the world failing to act sooner continue to mount — and the pandemic is far from over. Now is the time for a step change in the ambition of the U.S. and global leaders to do what it will take to end this pandemic for everyone, and ensure that COVID-19 leaves a long-term legacy of a pandemic-proof world. 

UN Dialogue on Pandemic Preparedness and Response — Five Principles for Financing Future Preparedness

Gabrielle Fitzgerald, Co-founder, Pandemic Action Network 

It was an honor to have the opportunity to speak today at a meeting with UN ambassadors and global health leaders convened by the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, together with UN Representatives of Norway, Argentina, and South Africa, on how to strengthen the pandemic preparedness and response architecture

In preparing for today, I went back and reviewed many of the papers and recommendations that were prepared in response to the West Africa Ebola outbreak, many of which I took part in. In looking at these papers, written just five or six years ago, two things stood out:

First, the vast majority of the financing discussions were focused on how to ensure there were adequate funding mechanisms for responding to disease outbreaks, and very little on how to prepare.

Second, I saw that one paper begot another commission which begot another paper, into a seemingly endless cycle, with minimal action. 

To be fair, there were some important changes following the West Africa outbreak: The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, or CEPI, was created — a critically important organization that helps accelerate the development of new vaccines for emerging infectious diseases with pandemic potential. The World Health Organization’s Health Emergencies Programme was strengthened, and a Contingency Fund for Emergencies was capitalized. But the more far-reaching, systemic issues were not addressed, because there was no political will at the time to carry recommendations of that nature forward — and the world once again turned its attention elsewhere.

Pandemic Action Network was founded to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Our mission is to build political support for a rapid end to the COVID-19 pandemic and to ensure long-term pandemic preparedness. We are now a network of more than 100 organizations and growing, representing a range of stakeholders from across sectors and geographies, that have come together to build and sustain that political will. To that end, our Network has set out a bold, but achievable, agenda for action by world leaders in 2021.

In today’s session, I stressed that there is a political window of opportunity that exists now that shouldn’t be missed. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, it might be tempting to say that all our energies should be focused on responding to this disease. The urgency is great, but we must raise our level of ambition and act on both fronts. With pandemic threats now emerging on the order of at least once every decade, world leaders cannot wait until COVID-19 is behind us to take action on ensuring countries are prepared for the next pandemic. 

As global leaders consider options for how to ensure there is a sufficient, predictable, and sustainable funding model to support pandemic preparedness, I encouraged the group to take into account five principles:

Act with urgency — COVID-19 has shown us that a pandemic has massive economic, social, and security implications. The funding mechanism should be developed quickly, and governed, resourced, and structured to drive rapid investments and results.

Focus on preparedness — The funding mechanism must be focused specifically on accelerating and sustaining preparedness for the looming threat of epidemics and pandemics.

Promote head of state leadership and country ownership — COVID-19 makes clear that pandemics are not only a health threat, they are also a grave economic and security threat. We need to ensure that every head of state treats pandemic preparedness as a top priority and leads their country in developing and implementing a whole-of-government national action plan to close their preparedness gaps and maintain readiness for the next pandemic threat.

Ensure additionality — Funding for better preparedness requires substantial new and targeted investments, commensurate with the global threat and national needs, but these funds must not come at the expense of other existing global health priorities and investments.

Bolster accountability — The funding mechanism must drive accountability for progress against widely agreed health security measures, including the International Health Regulations (IHRs) and joint external evaluation (JEEs), and must have a diverse and independent global governance structure that includes civil society and the private sector.  

In the spirit of urgency, I encouraged the UN member states represented at the meeting to not let “perfect be the enemy of the good.” We cannot afford to wait to have every detail figured out before we move forward on creating and beginning to implement a new financing mechanism to support preparedness.

India Post-COVID-19: An Opportunity to Strengthen Health Security Through Cross-Sector Collaboration

Patrik Silborn, Pandemic Action Network Regional Advisor, Asia-Pacific and Madhav Joshi, CEO, India Health Fund and Pandemic Action Network Advisory Committee Member

Around the world, COVID-19 has laid bare critical gaps in the world’s health infrastructure, and India is no different. In the past two decades the country has significantly improved health outcomes with sharp reductions in child and maternal mortality and the successful elimination of several infectious diseases. Yet, the pandemic threatens to reverse this progress.

Since the start of the COVID-19, over 13 million cases have been registered, resulting in 171 thousand deaths. However, it is believed that these numbers severely underestimate the true spread of the disease. Estimates vary, but some researchers believe that as many as 90 cases are missed for every confirmed infection. The economic impact has been significant, with GDP expected to contract by 8% in 2020 and the hardest effects felt by the most vulnerable. India also has the highest rate of tuberculosis (TB) in the world, claiming around 436 thousand lives every year. In the first half of 2020, TB case notifications dropped by 25 percent compared to the year prior, which is expected to increase mortality rates further. Adding to the challenge, people with TB are at greater risk of COVID-19, and the potential for co-morbidities points to the need for integrated multi-disease approaches instead of the diagnosis and control of one disease at a time.

COVID-19 has been an extraordinary challenge, but the crisis is also an opportunity for India to rebuild better. The pandemic has created new opportunities for improving collaboration across sectors in India. To do this effectively, however, public and private stakeholders must come together to establish joint priorities, improve the pooling of resources, and leverage the unique capabilities of every actor. 

In short, India needs a new compact between the public and private sectors. A number of factors make this both a relevant and opportune time to seize this opportunity.

First, India has a thriving private healthcare sector. The country is home to some of the largest pharmaceutical and vaccines producers in the world, and it has become the largest supplier of generic drugs and vaccines globally. India’s private hospitals attract patients from around the world for specialised treatment. And in India, over 70 percent of people — including low-income earners — seek healthcare services from private providers. 

Second, the government is demonstrating a commitment to improve healthcare outcomes.  In 2017, the Government of India embarked on its most ambitious health program ever.  Ayushman Bharat is a social health insurance scheme that will cover healthcare costs of over 500 million people when fully deployed. Further, the Government of India increased the health budget by over 100 percent this year with ambitious plans to upgrade health infrastructure at all levels.

Third, there is a growing philanthropy movement that brings both ambition and capital to address challenges at scale. India is home to some of the largest and most innovative companies in the world, and private wealth has exploded in recent years. Spurred on by a desire to give back to communities, and the 2 percent CSR tax, new philanthropic initiatives have sprung up in recent years. This is a trend that has been accelerated by the recent pandemic. The multiple interlinked COVID-19 induced crises — from migrant workers and vulnerable populations losing their livelihoods and homes, children missing education opportunities, to overburdened health workers — has spurred unprecedented individual and corporate philanthropy in India.

Finally, there is recognition by all stakeholders for the need to reimagine primary healthcare delivery in the country. With a population of 1.3 billion people, providing access to care for everyone and putting in place effective pandemic preparedness and response systems will require a reimagination of the entire healthcare system. To detect and respond to existing diseases or new pathogens, India must strengthen both public and private service delivery. This requires innovation — not only of tools and systems — but also in how services are being delivered through primary health care systems. 

There are several stakeholders across the public and private sectors that must come together to make this happen. 

  • Universities and research institutions in India have the knowledge and basic research needed to develop innovative solutions that can meet the unique needs of a large and underserved population, especially in screening, diagnostics and technology-enabled solutions. 
  • Indian companies and start-ups have the ability to apply these technologies to develop solutions designed for low-resource settings in India and other parts of the world. 
  • The Government can create a favourable policy environment for innovations as well as avenues for introducing new solutions in the public health system.

COVID-19 has highlighted the need for pandemic-proofing the world. Leaders have an historic opportunity to take actions now that will not only hasten the end of this pandemic, but will also begin to pandemic-proof the planet so that future generations never again experience the health, economic, and social devastation wrought by COVID-19. To do so, all countries must invest more money in health security, in the capacity to develop and produce vaccines, in the detection and response to new pathogens, and in reinforcing collaboration across borders. 

But India can engage globally while taking action at home. Now is the time to develop the partnerships that can drive innovation, the surveillance systems needed to quickly detect and respond to new pathogens, and the approaches that put the needs of patients at the centre. This will make India better equipped to respond to COVID-19 and make India healthier in the future. The fight against this pandemic is still not over. But this is a unique moment to build a bridge to a better future.

It’s Time to Pandemic-Proof the World: A 2021 Agenda for Action

The devastating health, economic, and social impacts of the COVID-19 global health crisis show that it is well past time for world leaders to prepare for pandemics as the existential, catastrophic, and growing global security threat they are. In 2010, well before COVID-19, there were six times more zoonotic spillover events than in 1980, and the number of new outbreaks continues to grow. Persistent gaps in international pandemic preparedness and response capacities have been flagged by various expert panels in the wake of previous health emergencies, but time and again, once the crisis disappears, political attention and funding shifts to other priorities. This dereliction of duty must stop once and for all.

Despite impacting people around the globe, COVID-19 has not affected everyone equally. The pandemic has exposed and exacerbated long-standing health and socio-economic inequalities within and across countries and in marginalized and vulnerable populations, including inequalities due to gender, race, ethnicity, class, and disability. The glaring disparities in global access to lifesaving COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics, diagnostics, and vital tools such as oxygen and personal protective equipment (PPE) underscore the inequitable global health and preparedness system. And the lack of proactive attention by leaders to address and account for these inequities has significantly undermined the global COVID-19 response.

As the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB) made clear in its September 2020 report A World in Disorder, the world cannot afford to continue to ignore or delay preparations to bolster our collective defenses against emerging pandemic threats. As they battle the current crisis, countries and international institutions must act now to ensure the world is better prepared for the next pandemic threat, which may be lurking just around the corner. These commitments should include building and reliably funding a well-trained and well-equipped health and research workforce, more resilient frontline health systems, timely and transparent disease surveillance, and effective supply chains for vaccines, diagnostics, PPE, and other tools to enable every country to detect, prevent, and rapidly respond to outbreaks before they become deadly and costly pandemics. It is time to invest in a smarter, more responsive, and more resilient global health security architecture.

Pandemic Action Network’s 100+ partners urge world leaders to take urgent action in the following areas to bolster the global COVID-19 response, hasten an end to this global crisis, and lay the groundwork for a more pandemic-proof world.

Support an equitable global response to COVID-19

The only way to end this pandemic is to end it for everyone through a coordinated global response. Yet as world leaders navigate the second year of responding to COVID-19 and securing vaccine doses for their constituents, nationalist inequitable approaches are still pervasive. Recent data shows that the world has now procured enough COVID-19 vaccine doses to reach herd immunity globally, but while some high-income countries have secured multiple times the number of doses as there are eligible adults in their countries, only 0.2% of doses administered have been in low- and middle-incomes countries (LMICs). Although it may seem intuitive for governments to first take action at home, this approach belies the fact that the virus — and its swiftly spreading variants — do not respect borders. Many countries that managed to control or even stop the spread of the virus earlier in the pandemic are once again seeing a surge in cases. There simply is no effective domestic response without also embracing a global approach. Everyone deserves to hope for a swift end to the pandemic, regardless of where they live. But it will only be possible if political leaders act globally as well as locally, knowing no country will be safe until every country is safe.

1. Accelerate global access and delivery of COVID-19 vaccines needed to achieve at least 70% coverage in all countries and enable an equitable global response and recovery.

World leaders should:

  • Fully fund the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) in 2021, filling the $22.1 billion funding gap as soon as possible with countries paying their fair share for this global public good. Countries should also commit to continue to invest in research and development (R&D) as well as scale-up of proven tools to prevent, test, and treat COVID-19 and ensure that medical countermeasures are effective against all strain mutations and all variants of concern. Given the scale of resources required, countries will need to tap into fiscal stimulus funding and other financial sources beyond official development assistance (ODA).
  • Agree to a roadmap to achieve at least 70% coverage of vaccines for LMICs, with at least 30% being secured, delivered, and administered in 2021. Leaders need to agree to a fully costed plan to achieve equitable global coverage as soon as possible. The full costs of delivering and administering doses in-country should be included in this roadmap, as well as the investments in vaccine education required to increase vaccine confidence.
  • Commit to donate, free of charge, all excess COVID-19 vaccine doses to the COVAX facility in parallel to their domestic vaccination efforts and start those donations as soon as possible. Countries should immediately announce commitments to share their full surplus supply on the most ambitious timeline possible, putting plans in place to deliver on this commitment as soon as is feasible in 2021 in line with COVAX’s dose sharing principles. These donations should not count as ODA, and should be in addition to funding the ACT-A.
  • Commit to “slot swaps” as another way to give COVAX additional supply. “Slot swaps” should be undertaken whereby high-income countries reallocate some of their existing orders immediately, potentially ordering replacement vaccines to arrive farther in the future, effectively giving their earlier “slots” to COVAX to help provide vaccines for LMICs to close the current acute gap in supply.
  • Ramp up global access and delivery of rapid testing, medical oxygen, and personal protective equipment to the frontlines. Continuing shortages of PPE and medical oxygen for frontline health workers and extremely limited deployment of testing — including genetic sequencing capacity to detect variants of interest — especially in LMICs, is hampering the global COVID-19 response and is a rate limiting factor for global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines and restoration of essential health services.

Prioritize and invest in pandemic preparedness and prevention

According to the IMF, the pandemic will cost the global economy and the World Bank projects that more than 160 million people will fall into poverty by the end of 2021. Conversely, recent estimates are that as little as $10-20 billion annually can ensure the world is much better prepared to detect, prevent, and respond to the next infectious disease outbreak before it becomes another deadly and costly pandemic. To minimize human lives lost from infectious diseases and lessen the impact on countries due to economic fallout, leaders should take the actions below to be prepared for the next pandemic.

2. Establish a catalytic, sustainable multilateral financing mechanism that is dedicated to promoting pandemic preparedness and prevention.

World leaders should:

  • Pledge new investments toward a target $20 billion initial capitalization co-funded from public, private, and philanthropic sources. Priorities for this new multilateral financing mechanism — which will fill a strategic gap in the existing global health architecture — should be on supporting LMICs to develop and implement national action plans for health security and pandemic preparedness, to close their urgent health security gaps, and foster a global “race to the top” among all nations for preparedness. The catalytic nature of this mechanism will help ensure both countries and other global health initiatives prioritize coordinated, multisectoral, prevention and preparedness funding in their domestic budgets, including support for country-level programmatic and managerial capacity in health systems strengthening.
  • Align funding with target country priorities to strengthen pandemic preparedness and containment as well as promote efforts toward pandemic prevention. Programs that should be financed at scale include detecting and stopping the spread of outbreaks and ensuring compliance with the International Health Regulations (IHRs), strengthening laboratory and manufacturing capacity, bolstering and protecting a trained, compensated health workforce, building and strengthening health information systems, ensuring resilient national and regional supply chains, One Health initiatives, and stopping zoonotic spillover from causing new outbreaks through measures such as reductions in deforestation and wildlife trade.

3. Bolster financing and at-the-ready global R&D capacity and coordination to combat emerging infectious diseases and pandemic threats without undermining important funding for existing epidemics research and innovation, including poverty-related and neglected diseases.

Applying the lessons learned from COVID-19, leaders should support the development and financing of mechanisms and initiatives that coordinate and catalyze research and development for new tools, including the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership, and other not-for-profit product development partnerships (PDPs) addressing the broad range of health threats.

World leaders should:

  • Fully fund CEPI’s $3.5 billion replenishment. This funding would support the organization’s moonshot initiative of compressing vaccine development for new pandemics to 100 days, and continuing efforts to develop vaccines for known threats. It would also support CEPI’s other objectives, including preparing clinical trial networks to quickly respond to new threats, coordinating with global regulators to streamline vaccine oversight, and linking manufacturing facilities to speed up global production.
  • Support integration of R&D into the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) framework to include R&D capacity-building for medical countermeasures. Inclusion of metrics through a GHSA R&D taskforce will help countries assess, prioritize, and better plan for strengthening their R&D capabilities.
  • Build on the ACT-A’s response to COVID-19 to ensure a robust, end-to-end, and sustainable investment in global health R&D for pandemic preparedness, including long-term investments to strengthen global research, laboratory, and manufacturing capacities. This future readiness state should also foster more investments and partnerships with diverse research and academic institutions to both build regional R&D prior to crises and scale up support during emergencies. Investments should be made with policies that promote equitable global access to and affordability of tools like vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics.

4. Strengthen global and national surveillance capacities & outbreak analytics.

COVID-19 has demonstrated global gaps in early detection and data sharing around emerging threats, as well as gaps in ongoing surveillance capacities of countries, especially low-resource countries. Current emerging infectious disease surveillance and investigation is poorly allocated, with the majority of the globe’s resources not focused on areas with the most zoonotic hotspots where the next emerging deadly pathogen is likely to originate.

World leaders should:

  • Strengthen integrated national disease surveillance capacities in LMICs. Such surveillance capacities should take a One Health approach and be responsive to local needs (i.e., give results in real-time for use by clinicians and public health officials). Such capacities should not be developed in a silo for pandemic risk monitoring; rather they should provide utility for day-to-day public health programs, leverage the latest developments in digital tools to streamline operations for health workers, and accelerate data flow and analysis.
  • Strengthen mechanisms and platforms that allow for independent sharing and verification of data related to emerging health threats, complementary to and in partnership with the WHO’s role in collecting data from official sources under the IHRs. Such capacities should enable and promote more transparency and accountability in data access for all relevant stakeholders.
  • Commit to the rapid publishing and sharing of line list and pathogen genome data into shared repositories (e.g., the Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System and the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration) to ensure that data necessary to monitor variants of concern can be acted upon before they become dominant.
  • Support innovations in outbreak detection and analytics capacity nationally through emergency operations centers, regionally through academic centers of excellence, and globally through laboratory and disease surveillance networks. The ACT-A has taught the community about the importance of collaboration and rapid response, and these lessons should be applied to future tools.

5. Bolster global capacities, institutions, and systems for pandemics, health security and resilient health systems, including through reforming WHO and strengthening international frameworks for pandemic preparedness and response.

World leaders should:

  • Build consensus for, and rapidly move to implement, proposals that will strengthen the WHO as the global coordinating authority on health. Leaders should support proposals for sustainable financing of the WHO, including incremental increases in assessed contributions and more (and more flexible) voluntary financing. Such resourcing should go hand-in-hand with strengthening the WHO’s normative and technical capacities, including the Chief Scientist’s Office, the Health Emergencies Programme, and the WHO Academy, and with encouraging greater staff mobility and budget flexibility to bolster the WHO’s capacities at the country-level. In line with the Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors (FENSA), leaders must enable more robust and transparent engagement with key stakeholders such as civil society and the private sector.
  • Strengthen the IHRs to foster more timely and accountable response to pandemic threats, including to authorize international investigations. Leaders should afford the WHO the ability to independently investigate potential and emerging threats, specify better information sharing, and better calibrate the definitions of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). Metrics on equity, R&D, infection prevention control, capacity strengthening, and water, sanitation and hygiene should also be included in the IHR Monitoring and Evaluation Framework, to incentivize countries to assess, plan, prioritize, and better support sustainable and resilient health systems, and promote healthcare worker safety.
  • Support other voluntary and compulsory instruments to strengthen accountability of nation states and foster multilateral cooperation for pandemic preparedness and response. Many gains can be made by strengthening existing mechanisms and instruments, which should be prioritized alongside the proposal for a new pandemic treaty. Such instruments should promote accountability in functions including ensuring novel countermeasures are treated as global public goods; motivating faster flow of financing to address direct and collateral impacts of pandemics, including protecting frontline health workers and social protection for vulnerable populations such as refugees and those living in conflict-affected areas; reaffirming the centrality of human rights considerations in the context of a pandemic; boosting domestic R&D and manufacturing capacity; and establishing up data surveillance systems, and norms and standards around data sharing and data privacy.
  • Scale up national and global vaccine education efforts to increase vaccine confidence, distribution, and uptake. Countries should have budgets dedicated for vaccine education within health ministries, initiate public education campaigns to manage the spread of misinformation online, and build capacity for vaccine hesitancy research. Training should be prioritized for frontline healthcare workers, community leaders, and others in how to engage in difficult conversations on vaccine hesitancy.

6. Promote equity-focused initiatives and human rights protections in all aspects of pandemic preparedness, response, and recovery, including specific attention to address the intersectional and gendered effects of outbreaks.

World leaders should:

  • Commit to equitable financing to support populations most at risk for morbidity and mortality, including addressing inequities due to disparities in gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and disability.
  • Ensure commitments to human rights and equity are met, in alignment with IHR Article 3 on human rights, the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 for Women, Peace and Security, the UN Political Declaration for Universal Health Coverage, and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
  • Commit to equal and diverse representation on emergency committees, including the IHR Emergency Committee and UN technical working groups, with active and meaningful participation of gender advisors and civil society groups as non-participant observers of EC meetings.
  • Ensure that all data pertinent to pandemic preparedness and response collected by the WHO and other health-focused UN bodies (as well as national governments) is published and disaggregated by sex and key socioeconomic groups.

 


 

An array of upcoming international summits — including the G20, G7, World Health Assembly, World Bank/IMF Meetings, and UN General Assembly — offer opportunities for leaders to act on this agenda. Critically, while health ministers have a key role to play, a concerted effort to end pandemics is a whole of government effort — and must be addressed at the level of heads of state. That is why the Pandemic Action Network supports the GPMB’s call for the UN Secretary-General to convene a focused UN High-Level Summit on Pandemic Preparedness and Response to mobilize increased domestic and international financing and advance efforts toward a new international framework for pandemic preparedness. Such a summit at head of state level should take up the forthcoming findings of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (the Independent Panel), the G20 High-Level Independent Panel for Financing the Global Commons (HLIP), the International Health Regulations (IHR) Review Committee, and the proposal for a new international treaty on pandemic preparedness and response.

World leaders must seize this opportunity to commit to action and leave a legacy of a healthier and safer world. We can pandemic-proof the future if world leaders act now. The world can’t afford to wait.

Pandemic Action Network Applauds Bipartisan Support for Global Health Security Legislation in U.S. House of Representatives

March 25, 2021 – Pandemic Action Network warmly welcomes the bipartisan advancement of a key global health security bill by the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee today. The Global Health Security Act of 2021 is an important step forward to accelerate and deepen U.S. global leadership in pandemic preparedness and response, and draws on lessons learned from COVID-19 to strengthen and invest in global efforts to detect, prevent, and respond to emerging pandemic threats that will keep America and the world healthier, safer, and more secure.

The Global Health Security Act of 2021 (HR 391) legislates the U.S. commitment to, and leadership in, the Global Health Security Agenda, a partnership of 70 countries working to secure global health security. In addition to elevating and improving U.S. prioritization and coordination of global health security efforts, the bill also instructs the Administration to work with other donor nations and multilateral stakeholders to establish a new Fund for Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness, which will leverage public and private financing to rapidly accelerate pandemic preparedness in lower-income countries. The Fund echoes calls from the Pandemic Action Network and partners as well as the language included in the recent National Security Memorandum from the White House to stand up an enduring, catalytic international financing mechanism to help countries close critical gaps in their preparedness for potential pandemics and incentivize sustainable domestic public and private sector investments in global health security. The Network calls  on the President and Congress to commit at least $2 billion to jumpstart the Fund this year.

Pandemic Action Network Co-Founder Carolyn Reynolds said, “Pandemic Action Network applauds the strong bipartisan cooperation in the House Foreign Affairs Committee to advance the Global Health Security Act, demonstrating the urgent imperative for U.S. global leadership to make the world safer from pandemic threats. Chronic underinvestment in public health systems and pandemic preparedness has been a major factor in the inadequate control of COVID-19 around the world, and that neglect must stop once and for all.  The bipartisan support for this bill underscores that health security is not a partisan issue, but it is the smart, strategic, and right thing to do—for America and the world.  

“We thank House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Meeks, Ranking Member McCaul, and Representatives Connolly and Chabot for their leadership and strong commitment to heed the lessons learned from COVID-19 and help ensure that America engages with the world in preventing another deadly, costly pandemic from happening again. We urge the entire House to approve this critical health security bill without delay.”

A Year Into COVID-19 – The Costs of Being Unprepared

Gabrielle Fitzgerald, Co-founder

 

The day life changed

The day everything changed for me was February 29, 2020. It was a Saturday. I’d spent the morning having coffee with an old friend, buying Girl Scout cookies from the daughter of another.

I’d just flown back to Seattle after two weeks of personal and business travel had brought me through five airports on three continents. During the trip, I tracked the wildly different ways countries were monitoring travelers for what was then known as novel coronavirus. While I was thinking a lot about this new outbreak from a work perspective — having advocated for the past few years on outbreak preparedness, and also having Panorama team members deployed to Geneva to support the World Health Organization (WHO) surge their communications response — coronavirus still felt like a far-off threat.

As I walked home from the coffee shop, I checked my phone and learned that the first U.S. death from coronavirus had been announced, at a hospital just outside of Seattle. And that a nursing home, just three miles from my daughters’ school, had identified their first two cases.

The next few days, in every aspect, I felt life cleaving into Before and After. I went to church, where Before and After wrestled for dominance: The traditional handshake greeting was ruled out, but the sacramental wine was still offered via a shared chalice. I went out to dinner, knowing it would be the last time for quite a while.

On Monday, we received an email from my children’s school announcing that the school would be closing at the end of the day for the next six weeks. Most parents were shocked and thought this was a radical step to take after just a few deaths, but to this day, I praise the fast-thinking leaders who understood the risks at hand and took decisive action as the first school in the nation to close. As the week went on, I canceled a business trip and announced we would be closing our office for “at least a month.” I shared information with friends to encourage them to take this seriously and explain what our new world of social distancing meant. Then, on March 11, the WHO officially declared COVID-19 a pandemic.

A year into this pandemic, what have we learned? And what can we do to ensure we never have a year like this again? If we don’t draw lessons from this experience, then we’re doomed to repeat it.

Predictable problem

I had spent a year working on the West Africa Ebola outbreak in 2014-2015. That experience left me passionate about the need to do all we could to prevent large-scale outbreaks in the future.

For anyone who pays attention to disease outbreaks, it was common knowledge that the world was likely to face a major pandemic “in our lifetime.” However, in my mind, that lifetime was always in the distant future, and always in another part of the world.

Just 10 weeks before an unusual disease outbreak was reported in China, I participated in a simulation exercise designed to raise awareness about the potential damage a worldwide pandemic could have. This session certainly drove home the massive risk to global corporations, supply chains, and the travel industry. But what it didn’t capture was the pain of saying good-bye to loved ones by phone, the boarded-up restaurants, and the monotony of pandemic life.

Having just marked the anniversary of the day everything changed for me, and on the eve of the anniversary of the WHO’s pandemic declaration, I’m reflecting on what we could have seen coming and what we can learn from the shocks and losses we’ve experienced.

What isn’t surprising. . .

Leadership and fact-based communications are essential — Decisive political action and clear, fact-based communication are indispensable during crisis. We have seen way too many examples of leadership being abdicated and non-science-based messaging on COVID-19, which have led us to the point that we are now in year two of this pandemic.

Increased inequity — Outbreaks always hit vulnerable populations hardest. We have certainly seen this here in the U.S., but it is a global problem too. Early in the pandemic, we created the Pandemic Action Network to accelerate the response to COVID-19 and advocate for future pandemic preparedness. One of the major initiatives we are advocating on behalf of is the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A), which was created to ensure equitable access to vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics to all countries of the world, not just those who can pay the highest prices.

Investment in research and development pays off — Back when I worked in the Clinton administration, the budget for the National Institutes for Health was doubled, seeding much of the research that allows us to have a vaccine today. If scientists hadn’t been picking away at spike proteins “just in case,” I shudder to imagine where we’d be today. And next time there is an outbreak, we won’t be as lucky unless we invest and plan ahead now.

What did surprise me. . .

Leadership (part 2) — I had no idea how disengaged and downright antagonistic the U.S. federal government would be. Withdrawing from the WHO? Leaving every state to make their own plans? I’m still shocked by these moves, and we’re still suffering because of them. The importance of strong national leadership and clear, consistent messaging simply can’t be understated. Pandemics are universal — that’s the “pan” part of the word. You can’t fight them locally. It takes national and global coordination.

Speed of vaccine development — This was a good surprise. A huge and heroic win. And a record-breaking timeline that far exceeded the best hopes of many. The fastest a vaccine had previously been developed was four years. The fact that the COVID-19 vaccine was being distributed within a year of the virus being sequenced is just short of a modern miracle and is a direct result of investment in research and development.

Progress toward equitable vaccine distribution — While there is still an extremely long road ahead to ensure that everyone in the world has access to a COVID-19 vaccine, it was good to see vaccines arriving in Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire and quite a few other African countries this week. Thanks to the ACT-A, this came only 11 weeks after the first vaccine was given in the U.K. In the past, the average gap between wealthy and low-income countries receiving vaccine supply was closer to 11 years. There are many, many more doses that need to be delivered to low- and middle-income countries, but at least the wait has been in weeks, not years.

The ongoing gap in health workers accessing PPE — While this problem has been mostly resolved here at home, it remains a challenge in many parts of the world. In many countries, there is no local manufacturing and there isn’t enough PPE to protect the community health workers who serve hundreds of millions of patients who don’t have access to a medical clinic or hospital. In response to this challenge, the Pandemic Action Network worked with other partners to create the COVID-19 Action Fund for Africa, which brings together global manufacturers and shippers with African health systems. To date, the fund has delivered nearly 86 million pieces of PPE to nearly 500,000 community health workers in 18 countries. But this is a stopgap measure, and we need to ensure that health workers like these around the world have ready access to critical supplies, so we don’t have to play catch-up in the future.

Personal loss and disruption — The pandemic simulation I mentioned above discussed projected costs in GDP and other common macro measures. Living through a pandemic puts you in touch with other costs — all the micro-level changes and personal losses. The disruption to education caused massive ripples I hadn’t thought about, from childcare to mental health. Now, with my teenagers spending a whole year at home during the most socially dynamic stage of their lives, I think about it every day. Then there’s the millions of mothers who have been driven out of the workforce because of the lack of childcare. The holiday gatherings that didn’t happen. I had no idea how much, and in how many ways, a year like this would hurt.

So what have we learned?

The last 12 months have taught us so much. About the need to be prepared. The vast and also personal cost of being unprepared. The things we have to do better.

We must put these lessons to use. National and global leaders must act now to prepare for the future. The Pandemic Action Network has identified six priorities for international action, including better means of detecting outbreaks, more research into infectious diseases, more secure supply chains for pandemic-fighting materials, and greater investment and accountability in health security. That’s how we beat the next pandemic.

After this year, the world can’t afford excuses. We’ve all seen the ways our systems break down or reveal that they’re broken and unfair to begin with. We’ve all felt the ways our lives suffer. None of us wants to experience another year like this.

Our Pandemic Anniversary Wish: Let’s Pandemic-Proof the Planet

Co-founders of Pandemic Action Network: Carolyn Reynolds, David Kyne, Eloise Todd, and Gabrielle Fitzgerald

One year ago, on March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) finally told the world what was already clear: that with 118,000 cases in over 110 countries and territories around the world, COVID-19 could be “characterized as a pandemic.” Of course, we had no idea at that time just how large and protracted this global crisis would become, with more than 117 million cases and over 2.6 million deaths worldwide and counting as of today.

It’s been a year of both horrible and amazing developments. Around the world, governments have scrambled, misinformation has flourished, advocates have rallied, scientists have mobilized, frontline healthcare, public health, essential workers have stepped up. There have been incredible stories of resilience, adaptation, and innovation by families, communities, and businesses. Yet crisis can be a great revealer, and this one has also exposed and preyed upon deep and longstanding global inequities, vulnerabilities, and broken systems.

The anniversary of this crisis should be a moment for all of us to reflect on what we have learned, and to commit to bold and urgent action.

Leaders have an historic opportunity to take actions now that will not only hasten the end of this pandemic, but will also begin to pandemic-proof the planet so that future generations never again experience the health, economic, and social devastation we have seen over the past year. 

The pandemic has affected every aspect of our lives and the solutions require leadership from all of us. We need the best and brightest not only working in science and health but also in finance, defense, technology, education, manufacturing, transport, and across every other sector of the global economy to join forces to solve this global challenge. And pandemic-proofing the planet demands that we tackle the dual threats of climate and health hand-in-hand.

We are calling on world leaders to seize this moment to commit to take action in four areas that will help pandemic-proof the planet and leave humanity healthier, safer, more resilient, and more prosperous.

Pandemic Action Network’s Pandemic-Proof Agenda

Speed up access and delivery of COVID-19 vaccines and other lifesaving tools to everyone, regardless of where they live. This starts with fully funding the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator and COVAX Facility. It also means countries which have secured more vaccine doses than they need should start donating vaccines to reach other nations in need, in parallel to their domestic vaccine rollout. Governments and industry also must join together to find the resources, and eliminate the bottlenecks, necessary to ramp up global manufacturing capacity, as part of a roadmap to get to at least 60-70% vaccine coverage in every country. With the evolving virus strain mutations, we are in a race against time to control this pandemic. But let’s also make sure these efforts do not come at the expense of other global health needs and goals.

Get serious on investing in pandemic preparedness. Donor nations, private foundations, and investors should come together to establish a sustainable global financing mechanism for pandemic preparedness, with an initial funding target of US$20 billion. Now is the time to fuel a global “pandemic-proof challenge” to ensure that every country has the plans, capacity, trained workforce, and functioning system it needs to effectively prevent, detect, and respond to outbreaks at their source before they spread and become deadly pandemics. This initiative should also incentivize countries to prioritize pandemics in their domestic budgets as a long-term security threat. Smart climate, biodiversity, and land-use policies must be a critical piece of those plans.

Bolster global research, development, and delivery of tools for emerging infectious disease threats. The COVID-19 crisis has shown that the world needs an at-the-ready capacity for timely delivery of the health technologies and supplies needed to combat both the known and unknown diseases likely to spark the next pandemic. A good start will be to support the US$3.5 billion five-year strategy of the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) to achieve its moonshot goal to have a new vaccine ready within 100 days when the next novel disease outbreak happens. And we must build a seamless global network of regional R&D, manufacturing, and supply hubs and streamline regulatory processes so that every nation can quickly get the tools when they need them.

Build a smarter global pandemic defense system. Defense starts with prevention, and the UK’s five-point plan for the G7 and the COP26 meeting later this year offer the opportunity for bold action on climate which could drastically reduce the chances of pandemics occurring in the first place. But we know outbreaks will happen, and more frequently. So the WHO must be strengthened and fit-for-purpose, with reliable funding, enhanced authority to conduct early and independent outbreak investigations, and the ability to hold member states accountable for compliance with the International Health Regulations (IHRs). To help “pandemic-proof” the future, the world also needs a new international preparedness framework or pandemic treaty and a state-of-the-art, global virus surveillance and detection system to better predict and manage cross-border threats.

A year into this crisis, we are all experiencing pandemic fatigue. The rollout of new vaccines is providing hope that the end may be near, and we can get on with our lives. Yet the reality today is that for the vast majority of the world’s population, that hope remains elusive. Everyone will remain at risk until there is universal access to the vaccines and the virus is contained everywhere. Unless we speed up the global response, we could be marking the second anniversary of this pandemic next year. Furthermore, the next pandemic could be around the corner, and could be even more lethal and costlier than this one.

But it doesn’t have to be this way: we can pandemic-proof the future if world leaders heed our wish and take action now in these four areas. The world can’t afford to wait.

Pandemic Action Network Statement on Outcomes of the G7 Special Summit and Munich Security Conference on the Global COVID-19 Response

Eloise Todd and Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founders of the Pandemic Action Network, said:

The Pandemic Action Network applauds the financial pledges made today by global leaders to the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and its COVAX facility, which together constitute a significant jump forward toward ACT-A’s US$38B funding target. Substantial contributions from the leaders of the US, Germany, and the European Commission helped make this leap, along with new contributions from Canada and Japan. We also welcome US President Joe Biden’s call for increased investments in global health security to address emerging pandemic and biosecurity threats.

This strong show of multilateralism, together with commitments already made by the United Kingdom’s leadership of the G7 Presidency and the Italian G20 Presidency to prioritize global health security in their forthcoming summits, gives us hope that 2021 could be the year in which we not only can turn the corner on COVID-19, but also lay the foundation for a world that will be better prepared for future pandemic threats.

To accelerate the end of this global crisis, we urge G7 leaders to heed the call of French President Emmanuel Macron to ensure healthcare workers and the most vulnerable people in the poorest countries can urgently access to COVID-19 vaccines, by sharing some of the vaccines ordered by the wealthiest countries without delay, as well as by closing the remaining financing gap for the ACT-Accelerator.

Yet even as the world is fighting this crisis, we must urgently prepare for the next one. That’s why we also are urging G7 and G20 leaders to join with President Biden in plans for “creating an enduring international catalytic financing mechanism for advancing and improving existing bilateral and multilateral approaches to global health security.” Speaker after speaker at the Munich Security Conference today talked about how the costs of inaction vastly outweigh the cost of acting in advance of future outbreaks to quash potential pandemic threats, yet preparedness has been ignored for far too long. Actions speak louder than words: Now is the time for the G7 and G20 to commit the policies, plans, and resources necessary to build a future that will protect both people and planet.

2021 could be a historic year for multilateral action to combat some of the gravest threats facing humanity. There is an opportunity for leaders to ensure equitable access to vaccines and to advance ambitious pandemic preparedness, climate, and biodiversity plans toward a better, safer, and healthier world. Our Network of more than 90 partners around the world stands ready to work with world leaders to seize this unprecedented opportunity. We simply cannot afford to fail.

A Year into COVID-19: It’s Time to Urgently Fund the Global Response and Start Preparing the World for the Next Pandemic

By Carolyn Reynolds and Eloise Todd

January 30 marks the one-year anniversary of the World Health Organization’s declaration of COVID-19 as a global health emergency. Yet as governments around the world have scrambled to respond and protect their citizens from the fast-moving pandemic, support for the global COVID-19 response has continued to be given short shrift. If we are going to end this devastating pandemic and make sure we are better prepared for the next one, this national near-sightedness must change now. 

The frightening speed with which variant strains of COVID-19 are spreading around the globe is further proof of how highly nationalist responses to the pandemic are misguided. While it may seem intuitive for governments to first take action at home, this approach belies the fact that the virus does not respect borders. Many countries that managed to control or even stop the spread of the virus earlier are once again seeing a surge in cases. There simply is no effective domestic response without also embracing a global approach.  

That’s why at the Pandemic Action Network we have been urging support for a robust, coordinated global response as the only way to hasten the end to COVID-19 everywhere and ensure that the trillions that countries are spending to try to end this crisis also help jumpstart long-ignored investments in better global preparedness to help stop the next pandemic before it starts. 

Early announcements on the importance of global engagement on the COVID-19 response and pandemic preparedness from the new Biden Administration in the US, together with the plans from the Italian presidency of the G20 and the European Commission to host a Global Health Summit in May and a 5-point plan from the UK presidency of the G7, are important signals of support for a stronger international approach. Those opportunities, along with the forthcoming final report of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response, offer an unprecedented political window of opportunity to act. But that window will likely close quickly as high-income countries get more of their populations vaccinated from COVID-19 and governments begin to shift their attention toward economic recovery and other needs that have been neglected during the pandemic. 

Our international network of more than 90 partner organizations is calling on world leaders to own and accelerate an aggressive agenda to stop the spread of COVID-19 everywhere and leave humanity better prepared for emerging pandemic threats. The imperative to act has never been greater: this deadly and costly pandemic has affected every nation, and the next one is lurking. Leaders need to get these four things done urgently in 2021 to make the world safer:

Fully fund the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and COVAX Facility to   speed up global access to COVID-19 vaccines. If vaccines are distributed only to high-income countries first, recent estimates are that the world may only avoid one-third of COVID-19 related deaths. While political commitments made thus far toward the ACT-A and its COVAX Facility have been a bright spot of rhetorical solidarity, world leaders must act on those words to urgently close the ACT-A financing gap to accelerate widespread distribution, not only in vaccines, which are in the spotlight right now, but also of diagnostics and therapeutics which will be needed even more while supplies of vaccines build up. When it comes to vaccines, all countries should also commit to work through the COVAX Facility to exchange and donate their excess vaccine supplies to support other nations in need.

Ramp up investments in frontline preparedness. Recent estimates point to at least a  US$5-10 billion annual funding gap to make the world better prepared for pandemics. This amount is likely now higher given the toll of COVID-19 has inflicted on frontline health workers and already struggling health systems around the world, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Yet this is still a small fraction of the trillions governments have spent on COVID-19 stimulus packages, vaccines, and other response measures to date. Just as the world mobilized to respond to the global AIDS crisis, this moment calls for a bold, dedicated multilateral financing mechanism to supercharge pandemic preparedness. Creating a Global Health Security Challenge Fund will support countries to close their critical health security gaps and stimulate a global “race to the top” for better preparedness. Once the ACT-A is fully funded, donor nations, private foundations, and investors should kickstart the Challenge Fund with an initial US$10 billion this year.

Bolster global research, development, and delivery of tools for emerging infectious disease threats. This crisis has shown that the world needs an at-the-ready capacity for timely delivery of the health technologies and supplies needed to combat the known and unknown diseases likely to spark the next pandemic. Leaders should secure and finance the effective Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) to ensure it has the resources necessary to continue to respond to COVID-19 and also to secure its future. Building on the emerging lessons from the current pandemic, CEPI has the potential to serve as a permanent global R&D coordination hub with an end-to-end approach, working closely with the World Health Organization on the global R&D Blueprint. Leaders should also help build and/or fortify a network of regional R&D, manufacturing, and supply hubs so that every continent and every nation can quickly get the tools to stop outbreaks at their source.  

Build a smarter global pandemic defense system. The WHO must be fit-for-purpose, with reliable funding, enhanced authority to conduct early and independent outbreak investigations, and the ability to hold member states accountable for compliance with the International Health Regulations (IHRs). To help “pandemic-proof” the future, the world also needs a new international preparedness framework and a state-of-the-art, global outbreak detection system to better predict and manage cross-border threats. European allies have laid out a 10-point WHO reform plan which, together with the forthcoming report of the Independent Panel, can provide the basis to achieve consensus on a more responsive global system. Pandemic preparedness should be at the top of the UN Security Council agenda, and the UN Secretary-General should convene heads of state in a global preparedness summit before the year’s end to secure their commitments to act – and enable their citizens to hold them to account.

Everyone deserves to hope for a swift end to the pandemic, regardless of where they live. But it will only be possible if our political leaders act globally as well as locally, knowing no country will be safe until every country is safe. Their shared goal should be even bigger: to leave a legacy of a healthier and safer world by taking the steps necessary to help prevent another deadly and costly pandemic from happening again.

Pandemic Action Network Praises White House Actions to Bolster the COVID-19 Response and Prioritize Pandemic Preparedness

The Pandemic Action Network warmly welcomes the suite of early announcements by the Biden-Harris Administration to elevate and accelerate global efforts to help hasten an end to the COVID-19 pandemic and ensure that America and the world is better prepared for emerging pandemic threats. The decisions and commitments by the White House adopt several of the recommendations that were included in a paper submitted to the Biden-Harris transition team by a group of leading U.S. global health policy experts, including two of our Pandemic Action Network co-founders, Carolyn Reynolds and Gabrielle Fitzgerald.

On his first day in office, President Biden signed a new Executive Order to organize and mobilize the U.S. government to provide an effective COVID-19 response and provide U.S. leadership on global health security. This was followed on day two with a National Security Directive on U.S. Global Leadership to Strengthen the International COVID-19 Response and Advance Global Health Security and Biological Preparedness and an Executive Order on Ensuring a Data-Driven Response to COVID-19 and Future High Consequence Public Health Threats. In addition, to underscore the new Administration’s support for the global COVID-19 response, Vice President Kamala Harris spoke with World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Dr. Tedros and Dr. Anthony Fauci spoke to the WHO’s Executive Board meeting.

Pandemic Action Network Co-Founder Carolyn Reynolds said,

“These early announcements and actions by President Biden and his Administration to prioritize global health security represent the kind of bold leadership that has been lacking on pandemic response and preparedness for far too long. We are delighted to see that President Biden has rightly elevated pandemic threats as a top national security priority for the United States, and that the plan he has put forward is both national and global, recognizing that America’s health and security depends on stopping COVID-19 and future biothreats both at home and abroad.

The Pandemic Action Network and our partners look forward to working with the Biden-Harris Administration and Congress to follow through on these commitments and leave a legacy that better prepares America and the world to address emerging pandemic threats and ensure that a deadly and costly pandemic like COVID-19 never happens again.”

Collectively, the White House actions taken to date respond to our Network’s calls for the Biden-Harris Administration on several issues, including to: prioritize and scale up financing for pandemic preparedness and response both at home and abroad; step up U.S. support for the global COVID-19 response, including joining the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and the COVAX Facility; reform and strengthen the World Health Organization; invest in better outbreak detection and analytics; strengthen global supply chains for frontline pandemic response, including for personal protective equipment; and elevate leadership and accountability within the U.S. government on pandemics.

Go Big: President Biden Has an Unprecedented Opportunity to Make Humanity Safer from Pandemic Threats

By: Carolyn Reynolds

The inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as the new U.S. President and Vice President has arrived with a mix of sadness and hope. The 400 lights along the Lincoln Memorial reflecting pool and 200,000 flags on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. are poignant reminders of the devastating COVID-19 pandemic. The deadly combination of this protracted health crisis and the recent assault on the U.S. Capitol building have cast a dark shadow over this historic occasion. Yet it also underscores the tremendous urgency – and opportunity – to finally get COVID-19 under control and take the steps necessary to make America and the world better prepared for future pandemic threats. It is now or never to go big – both on pandemic response and on preparedness.

With 400,000 American deaths and counting and tens of millions of families struggling with unemployment, hunger, and virtual schooling, the new Administration has rightly made the domestic COVID-19 response job one. Before inauguration, President Biden rolled out an ambitious $1.9 trillion COVID-19 stimulus and response plan and plan to vaccinate 100 million in 100 days. Included in the package is a relatively very modest, but critically important, $11 billion toward the global pandemic response – recognizing America will not be safe until every country is safe, and that America’s health and economic recovery from the pandemic is highly dependent on the world’s health and recovery.

More good news came from Secretary of State-designate Tony Blinken’s remarks at his confirmation hearing that the United States would formally join COVAX to promote global access to COVID-19 vaccines. Together with the appointment of an experienced slate of leaders to key Administration posts who are highly knowledgeable on pandemic threats – Blinken, Ron Klain, Jake Sullivan, Susan Rice, Samantha Power, Beth Cameron, Bonnie Jenkins, and Rochelle Walensky, among others – and the plan to reverse withdrawal of the United States from the WHO on day one, the Biden-Harris Administration is off to a good start.

But the new President and his team must do much more to meet this moment in history. Even as we fight the pandemic before us, the next pandemic will not wait. The failure to sustain high-level political leadership and investments to prioritize pandemic preparedness left the world highly vulnerable to the novel coronavirus. A full year into this crisis, there are still gaping holes around the world in frontline infection prevention and control capabilities and reliable data. Gaps in affordable access to vaccines, diagnostics, treatments, personal protective equipment and other essential supplies to detect, prevent, and respond to outbreaks are more glaring than ever, despite repeated warnings and solutions from numerous expert commissions and reports over the past five years. It should not be this way.

It is time to go big. As a centerpiece of President Biden’s plans to assert America’s position as a go-to leader and partner on the world stage, we are urging the Biden-Harris Administration to work with Congress and world leaders to launch and lead an aggressive agenda for action on global health security, including:

1) Finish the fight on the global COVID-19 response: Urgently help close the remaining financing gap for the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator to support widespread global distribution of vaccines, and commit to work through the COVAX facility to exchange and/or donate vaccine supplies to support other nations in need.

2) Ramp up U.S. investments in global health and pandemic preparedness: Establish a dedicated Global Health Security Challenge Fund to accelerate national investments to close critical health security gaps and stimulate a global “race to the top” for preparedness. The United States should commit $2 billion to kickstart a $10-20 billion Challenge Fund – a tremendous bargain compared to the trillions being spent for COVID response and recovery. Overall, the United States should double funding for global health security and other global health programs over the next five years, including investing in a stronger frontline health workforce as the first line of defense for outbreaks.

3) Build a smarter global pandemic defense system: Ensure the WHO is fit-for-purpose, including reliable funding, enhanced authority to conduct early and independent outbreak investigations, and the ability to hold member states accountable for compliance with the International Health Regulations (IHRs). To help “pandemic-proof” the future, the world also needs a new international preparedness framework and a state-of-the-art, global outbreak detection system to better predict and manage cross-border threats. The United States should also put pandemic preparedness at the top of the UN Security Council agenda and call on the UN Secretary-General to convene heads of state in a global preparedness summit this year.

4) Bolster global research, development, and delivery of tools for emerging infectious disease threats: Make a $200 million commitment for U.S. participation in the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and expand its capacity to serve as a permanent global R&D coordination hub with an end-to-end approach. Leaders should also fortify a network of regional R&D, manufacturing, and supply hubs so that every continent and every nation can quickly get the tools to stop outbreaks at their source. Supporting a global health security-focused Grand Challenge at USAID and a permanent emerging and reemerging infectious diseases funding line for BARDA will be other key tools in our pandemic arsenal.

5) Elevate U.S. global leadership, diplomacy, and accountability: Designate and empower high-level interagency leadership roles with the funding necessary to elevate and sustain global preparedness as a continuing national security, diplomatic, and health priority. A 9/11-style bipartisan Commission on the U.S. Response to COVID-19 would provide a critical public examination and political pressure to address the most urgent national and global preparedness gaps, and seek ways to protect the independence of our science and public health agencies.

This won’t be easy, given pressing domestic demands and deep divides and distrust in Congress and the American public. But like the response to 9/11 and the AIDS pandemic, the COVID-19 crisis demands extraordinary U.S. global leadership, ingenuity, and political resolve – to treat pandemics as the existential global and national security threat they are.

The good news is that there is a strong record of bipartisan support on addressing infectious disease threats to build on – from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act (PAHPA) to the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) and the 2015 Ebola supplemental bill. President Obama’s November 2016 Executive Order was left in place by the Trump White House, which also produced a strong Biodefense Strategy (2018) and Global Health Security Strategy (2019) at the direction of Congress. Bipartisan House and Senate bills introduced in the last Congress provide a starting point for building a new consensus.

Just as the military continuously prepares for war on multiple fronts, we can and must prevent the next pandemic while fighting this one. But the political opportunity to act is now, while the impact of COVID-19 is still front and center in people’s lives. Waiting until this pandemic is over or the next one comes is simply too late. We must not wait for the next crisis to act.

What We’re Reading to Start the New Year

By Autumn Lerner

Like so many, our team took a brief break at the end of 2020. The break gave us rest first and foremost, but also time to reflect on the challenges and opportunities ahead. As we enter 2021, the world is navigating a dark winter with the rampant spread of COVID-19, but also promise and opportunity presented by multiple viable vaccines. Despite vaccine rollout in 42 countries, low-income and middle-income countries have largely been left out. The second year of the pandemic is a critical time to secure political will and financing for both near-term global response measures and longer-term pandemic preparedness. As we start 2021, here’s a short list of pieces we are reading to inform our thinking and actions in the year ahead.

The Plague Year
Lawrence Wright, Staff Writer for The New Yorker, dissects what went wrong in America’s response to the coronavirus. The U.S. has only 4% of the world’s population—and yet it accounts for 20% of all COVID-19 deaths. Wright’s 30,000-word account, based on extensive interviews, offers an expansive portrait of how the pandemic has changed our lives. For a summary version, Wright was interviewed by Terry Gross on Fresh Air last week.

Which Countries Have Responded Best to COVID-19?
In this opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal, Dr. Tom Frieden discusses ways countries around the world responded best to COVID-19 in 2020. As we begin the new year continuing to fight the virus, he argues that we should learn from the most successful strategies to improve our testing, tracing, strategic closure, and other public health responses, even as vaccines are distributed around the world.

Where Year Two of the Pandemic Will Take Us
Ed Yong penned this piece in the Atlantic outlining what Americans can expect in the coming years as the world continues to battle COVID-19, which has taken more than 326,000 American lives to date. Cases continue to rise in the first weeks of 2021, and although vaccines are rolling out, the U.S. and the world have a ways to go to implement successful and equitable vaccine programs.

History will judge us if we vaccinate rich countries while poor ones suffer
Director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention Dr. John Nkengasong launched the new year with an urgent call-to-action for the world via an interview with Canada’s CBC Radio. “The silence of our friends will be remembered when the history of this pandemic will be written,” Dr. Nkengasong said, speaking to the inequity in the global vaccine rollout.

The Anti-Vaxx Playbook
While vaccine hesitancy and the anti-vaxx movement has been a growing challenge, the current pandemic has supercharged the situation, representing a tipping point for trust in vaccines overall. In a new report, the Center for Countering Digital Hate infiltrates a meeting of the world’s leading anti-vaccine advocates to expose their community’s tactics, messages, and use of social media to disrupt uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine.

What if Scientists Already Know How to Prevent the Next Pandemic?
In the Nation, Jimmy Tobias examines One Health, a pan-species approach to health that could ward off the next big outbreak. The piece details why we need to unite across environment, public health, agriculture, forestry, land use, climate movements, and more to prevent pandemics at the source.

Pandemic-Proof Your Habits
Kate Murphy’s recent article in the New York Times about habits and routines highlights how disruptive the pandemic has been to the structure that our brains typically rely on. This piece describes how and why our bodies and minds crave routine, and how we are not biologically engineered to deal with changes or disruptions to routine—which we got in spades in 2020!

Wishing all a productive reset and thoughtful setting of new routines that will give us the individual and collective energy to seize the opportunities and challenges of the year ahead. Together we can accelerate the journey to the end of COVID-19 and ensure that it leaves a long-term legacy of global pandemic preparedness.

Statement on FY21 Omnibus and Emergency COVID-19 Spending Bill

Pandemic Action Network welcomes emergency funding for Gavi, urges new Administration and Congress to prioritize global investments in pandemic preparedness and response

Pandemic Action Network Co-Founder Carolyn Reynolds released the following statement on the FY21 omnibus and emergency COVID-19 spending bill:

“We are pleased that Congress saw fit to include $4 billion for Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, in the final omnibus and emergency spending bill to support the global COVID-19 response. These funds will help ensure that people in need around the world can receive lifesaving vaccines as soon as possible, regardless of where they live.

But Congress must do much more to support global efforts to end this pandemic and help prevent the next one. A U.S. contribution of $4 billion for the Global Fund and $200 million for the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) are also urgently needed as part of a broader global response package to address COVID-19’s devastating impacts, which threaten to set back years, if not decades, of progress in global health.

Increasing global investments in pandemic preparedness and response is squarely in the U.S. interest: America will not be safe until every country is safe, and America’s health and economic recovery is highly dependent on global health and recovery. Like the response to 9/11 and the AIDS pandemic, the COVID-19 crisis demands extraordinary U.S. global leadership to treat pandemics as the existential national security threat they are.

We urge the 117th Congress and incoming Biden Administration to work together to significantly step up the global fight against infectious disease threats and prevent another deadly and costly pandemic from happening again.”

Read our recommendations for the incoming Biden-Harris Administration here.

Recommendations for the Biden-Harris Administration – Now or Never: An Agenda for Global Action to Make America and the World Safer from Pandemic Threats

We urge President-elect Biden and the incoming Biden-Harris Administration to launch and lead an aggressive agenda for action on global health security to end the COVID-19 pandemic as quickly as possible while accelerating global preparedness for the next pandemic. The following five-point agenda for action has been prepared by a group of leading U.S. global health policy experts, including two of our Pandemic Action Network co-founders. The outlined recommendations reflect the group’s collective experience as well as the conclusions of an extensive body of research and reports from numerous expert groups over the past five years. As the pandemic has upended lives and livelihoods in every household in America and every corner of the globe, the political moment is ripe for President-elect Biden to galvanize and lead a global coalition of public and private actors around a shared commitment to help prevent a deadly and costly pandemic like COVID-19 from happening again. President-elect Biden has the opportunity to leave a longer-term legacy that will better prepare humanity to more effectively address emerging pandemic threats, and break the persistent cycle of panic and neglect once and for all. Waiting until this crisis is over or until the next one happens will be too late. It’s now or never. Read the five-point agenda white paper here: Now or Never: An Agenda for Global Action to Make America and the World Safer from Pandemic Threats

World AIDS Day: It is Only By Coming Together That We Will Defeat COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS

By Isabelle de Lichtervelde

 

Each year, World AIDS Day is recognized on December 1 to commemorate those who have lost their lives to AIDS and those living with and affected by HIV. It has also been an important occasion to galvanise support for a stronger and fairer response to HIV/AIDS. As with everything else impacted by COVID-19’s devastation this year, World AIDS Day 2020 is a unique moment and opportunity.

COVID-19 has shown the world once again how health is interlinked with other critical issues, such as inequalities and economic well-being. COVID-19 has plunged the world economy into deep contraction and, like many other crises, it is hitting the poorest, most disadvantaged, and most vulnerable the hardest. The pandemic has also reminded us all that a global crisis requires a global response. 

The world has made significant progress since the late 1990s, but HIV remains a major global health crisis that has been further deepened by COVID-19. The UNAIDS annual report shows that HIV services have been worryingly disrupted due to COVID-19, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where health systems are more fragile. The HIV/AIDS response could be set back by 10 years or more, if COVID-19 leads to severe disruptions to HIV services, leaving many at greater risk of HIV infection and AIDS-related deaths. 

With this in mind, the theme of World AIDS Day 2020 is “Global solidarity, shared responsibility”. The world needs global solidarity and shared responsibility now to beat the epidemics of HIV and pandemic of COVID-19. 

For this to happen, here are three things that the world leaders need to do NOW.

  • Fully fund the global response against COVID-19 while protecting and increasing other life-saving health programmes. World leaders must commit to fully fund the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) without diverting investments from other health priorities, including HIV/AIDS. US$5.1 billion has been committed to the ACT-A to date. US$4.2 billion is still needed urgently, with another US$23.9 billion needed by the end of 2021. We must look beyond scarce development assistance budgets to fund the ACT-A. Official development assistance (ODA) is a precious resource that we must increase rather than decrease at a time of rising need in LMICs. Fully resourcing the ACT-A is not a matter of charity; it is an investment in the world’s recovery. Governments should use a portion of their domestic fiscal stimulus for the multilateral response against COVID-19, while increasing investment in other life-saving global health programmes. 
  • Invest in pandemic preparedness and prevention. Health systems must be urgently strengthened, in particular in LMICs in order to ensure all countries have the capacity to respond to COVID-19, HIV/AIDS, and other epidemics as well as prevent and be prepared for future epidemic threats. Other key pandemic preparedness and prevention priorities include accelerating global health research and development for epidemic-risk diseases and securing reliable access to personal protective equipment (PPE) and other pandemic supplies.
  • Ensure fair and equitable access to health tools globally. No-one can be left behind in accessing life-saving diagnostics, treatments, and vaccines. Errors of the past cannot be made again. Millions of people in LMICs died waiting for HIV treatment. Fully equitable access still isn’t a reality today. Due to lack of access to HIV services, 690,000 people died from HIV-related causes and 1.7 million people were newly infected last year. Fair and equitable access to all health commodities, including COVID-19 treatments, diagnostics, and future vaccines, must be urgently ensured. Global equity must be at the heart of the world’s response to COVID-19 by prioritising multilateral action over bilateral action and ensuring that distribution mechanisms and allocation frameworks are based on equitable terms. Products should be both accessible to LMICs as soon as they become available and suitable for LMIC settings.

 

COVID-19 has brought the world to its knees and has threatened decades of hard-won gains in the global HIV/AIDS response. However, this crisis is also an opportunity to do things differently and build back better. Every effort we make together in the fight against COVID-19 should leave a longer-term legacy that better prepares humanity to more effectively deal with outbreaks and pandemics, including HIV/AIDS.

Statement on President-Elect Biden’s Announcement of Ron Klain as Next White House Chief of Staff

The Pandemic Action Network welcomes President-elect Joe Biden’s appointment of Ron Klain to serve as the White House Chief of Staff for President-elect Biden.

Together with the Biden-Harris transition team’s announcement earlier this week of a seven-point plan to fight COVID-19 and a COVID-19 Advisory Board of seasoned public health experts, Klain’s appointment is a welcome signal that the incoming administration will make pandemics a top priority.

Network Co-founders Gabrielle Fitzgerald and Carolyn Reynolds stated, “Getting the COVID-19 pandemic under control is job one for the Biden-Harris Administration. Ron’s experience as Ebola Czar and his continuing advocacy will bring a strong manager and voice on pandemic threats to the White House. When it comes to pandemics, it’s time to break the cycle of panic and neglect once and for all. The Pandemic Action Network looks forward to working with the Biden-Harris Administration to do everything we can to end this pandemic and invest in better preparedness in the United States and around the world so that this never happens again.”

Multilateralism Matters: Why the U.S. Should Stay in the WHO

By Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founder, Pandemic Action Network

*This blog is adapted from an article published in CQ Researcher, September 2020

As the world marks United Nations Day on October 24 – in the midst of a pandemic with no end in sight ― it’s a good moment to reflect on how much the United States benefits from the UN, and in particular its membership in the World Health Organization (WHO). U.S. membership in the WHO is on the ballot in the presidential election, with the current Administration’s decision to initiate withdrawal of the U.S. from the WHO. On the other side, Democratic nominee Joe Biden has said that if he were to be elected President he would reverse the decision on day one in office.

The choice is clear: the WHO serves U.S. interests in several ways, and never more so than now.

First, as the COVID-19 pandemic has shown, infectious disease outbreaks anywhere in the world can quickly put American lives and livelihoods at risk. Until a vaccine exists and is widely and equitably delivered around the world, no country will be safe from COVID-19. Ending the pandemic requires a united global effort, in which the WHO plays an indispensable role. Countries worldwide rely on the WHO’s expertise to lead the global response to the pandemic, from providing technical guidance on proven interventions to coordinating international efforts to accelerate research, development, and universal access to a COVID-19 vaccine and to therapeutics. The WHO-coordinated Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and Solidarity Trial are unprecedented global efforts that will increase the likelihood of ending the pandemic faster.

Second, the WHO has led global efforts to combat a host of other infectious disease threats. The eradication in 1980 of smallpox, which killed an estimated 300 million people during the 20th century, is one of the agency’s greatest achievements. With sustained WHO leadership, the world is now extremely close to eradicating polio, down to just 176 cases worldwide in 2019.  U.S. political and economic support has been vital to this effort, and withdrawal could stall efforts to end this debilitating scourge. International efforts to fight influenza, HIV/AIDS, malaria, measles, and tuberculosis also depend on the WHO for support.

Third, the WHO provides the backbone for the world’s infectious disease early warning system.  Working closely with experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the WHO helps governments assess their pandemic preparedness gaps and mobilize early detection and response efforts. U.S. withdrawal will hobble that capacity and leave a major hole in the common global defense against growing pandemic threats.

Both the WHO and the United States have lessons to learn from this pandemic. While the WHO’s emergency response capacity has improved considerably in recent years, all agree it can be strengthened. An independent panel has been established to review the global COVID-19 response and what governments, the WHO, and the international system could do differently to improve their preparedness and response. But scapegoating the WHO for COVID-19 is a political distraction. The agency, which lacks the ability to compel member states to act, is only as effective as its members – particularly its most powerful member and largest donor – will allow.

Leaving the WHO will further erode U.S. influence on the global stage. It would be ill-advised at any time, but to do so as the world grapples with the mounting health and economic toll of the COVID-19 pandemic is unfathomable. Only global solidarity and a coordinated, multilateral approach will bring us safely out of this war against a deadly virus that knows no borders.

America needs the WHO, and the WHO needs America. The U.S. should not only stay in, it should also step up its support ― to end this pandemic and help prevent the next one.

G20 Leaders Must Turn Words Into Action on Pandemic Response and Preparedness

By Eloise Todd

The G20 Finance Ministers meeting conclusions yesterday contained some important steps forward that will provide more resources to developing countries to fight COVID-19 and mitigate the impact on already vulnerable communities. Unfortunately, the meetings did not emphasize the need to take action on key health priorities of pandemic preparedness and prevention or on financing the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A).

There were at least some welcome concrete steps taken yesterday. Extending the Debt Service Suspension Initiative by six months, and promising to consider a further six-month extension, frees up important liquidity for indebted countries at a time when resources are scarce. Ongoing commitments to support domestic tax revenue generation and collection in developing countries also helps economies weather the storm of this pandemic.

But on health-specific investments, it was words, not action, that dominated. Pandemic preparedness appears in the outcome text, but as all too often, as the last pillar of all – almost an afterthought. Our investments in preventing future pandemics should be top of mind, rather than at the end of the list. The G20 Finance Ministers at least agree to “enhance resilience against future shocks,” including using G20 infrastructure efforts to increase the resilience of infrastructure, as well as committing to better understanding the range of risks that lead to pandemics. At the Pandemic Action Network, we would like to see the efforts to protect our countries from future waves and risks rolled out alongside – and where possible integrated with – COVID-19 response efforts. Every effort we make in the fight against COVID-19 should leave a longer-term legacy that better prepares our countries to more effectively deal with pandemic outbreaks and – where possible – prevent them at the source. Pandemic prevention and preparedness should be among the G20’s top priorities throughout this pandemic and beyond.

At a time of crisis, we also need good intentions to convert as quickly as possible into action. While the updates to the G20 Action Plan hit the right topics, we need to see moments like G20 Finance Ministerials being used as a place to write the checks, not just agree with the general principle that more money is needed. The update to Pillar 1 of the Action Plan: “Health Response – Saving Lives,” for example, states that the G20 countries are “committed to investing in an effective response to the COVID-19 pandemic to bring the spread of the virus under control and prevent further transmission” – noting that getting on top of the disease is ultimately the only way in which our economies will recover. The reference highlighting the role of the ACT-A as a way in which we can take “forward our collective action to accelerate the research, development, manufacturing and distribution of COVID-19 diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines” is also welcome. But with the financing gap for 2020 hovering above $14B and just over two months to go until the end of the year, a meeting of the world’s most powerful Finance Ministers must lead to immediate action in the midst of a global pandemic. Not only does that gap need to be filled, but the time it takes from pledging funds to disbursement must be accelerated so that the time lag does not cost needless delays, and ultimately, lives.

As the Pandemic Action Network works with partners to encourage vaccinations and better understand vaccine hesitancy, we welcome the G20 showing a united front in “recognising the role of extensive immunization against COVID-19 as a global public good for health.” We also recognize that this important statement must be translated into action in the weeks and months ahead.

The G20 has a responsibility not only to free up liquidity, but also to direct funds from their own countries – the richest in the world with the access to the most diverse set of financial tools – toward the world’s most urgent priorities. The G20 Leaders’ Summit, then, is the opportunity for leaders to deliver more than in principle statements, and take responsibility for directing funds to the most urgent needs.

We call on leaders heading into the November Summit to convert two clear priorities into action: first, they should ratchet pandemic prevention and preparedness up the priority list; and second, they should turn their strong support for the ACT-A into much-needed funding to help fill the more than $14B funding gap. We will work alongside partners and governments to help encourage these outcomes, but decision makers need to use every opportunity they have to deliver concrete actions and funding in the weeks and months ahead. The longer they procrastinate, the longer it will take us to get a handle on COVID-19 and lives and livelihoods will be needlessly lost. Next month, leaders have to deliver – there is simply no time to delay.

Pandemic Action Agenda: What World Leaders Should Do to Help Prevent the Next Pandemic

With global COVID-19 cases set to surpass 50 million and spiking across the United States and Europe, world leaders are gathering in a series of international summits to discuss what they will do to stop the pandemic. The current crisis demands urgent and united action as a global community, as no country will be safe from the virus until every country is safe.

But this pandemic didn’t have to happen, and the next one won’t wait. As they fight the current battle, leaders must also take steps NOW to bolster our global and national defenses against emerging pandemic threats before they materialize.

Synthesizing lessons of what has gone wrong in COVID-19 and in previous outbreaks and epidemics, the Pandemic Action Network’s Global Health Security Architecture Working Group has identified six priorities for international action to ensure the world is better prepared for the next pandemic. These are captured in our brief Pandemic Action Agenda paper released last month.

 

 

Pandemic Action Agenda Series

Now we’re pleased to release a series of Pandemic Action Agenda papers which expand on each of the six priority areas for action:

Pandemic Action Agenda Summary: Calling on world leaders to strengthen the global health security architecture and governance and make the world better prepared for pandemics. 

Global Health R&D: Bolstering the global research and development architecture for health security.

Outbreak Detection: Enhancing the availability and use of reliable data and early warning systems to drive more effective preparedness and response to outbreaks.

Pandemic Financing: Mobilizing sufficient funding for national pandemic preparedness and global response efforts. 

Country Capacity: Enhancing countries’ capacity to prevent and respond to outbreaks through technical assistance and improving health security infrastructure.

Pandemic Supplies: Solving supply chain bottlenecks and ramping up regional and local production and delivery to ensure health workers everywhere have access to sufficient quality personal protective equipment (PPE) and other frontline health supplies.

Metrics and Evaluation: Increasing accountability through more effective mechanisms to assess—and fill gaps in—country preparedness levels. COMING SOON

 

What You Can Do

Advocate for action. Help us deliver the Pandemic Action Agenda directly to key decision-makers in your country and international organizations, and press them to take action on these issues. Contact Naomi Komuro at [email protected] and let us know who you can reach (or we can give you ideas!). 

Spread the word. Share the #PandemicActionAgenda on your social media channels and through other communications within your networks to help build us momentum to prioritize global preparedness. Find the social toolkit here

Hold leaders to account. Sustained advocacy and communications are essential to avoid repeating the cycle of panic and neglect when it comes to deadly outbreaks. Follow up with decision-makers through emails, meetings or events, and ask them share what they are doing to respond to the Pandemic Action Agenda—and let us know what you learn to inform our ongoing advocacy efforts. 

Every effort we make in the fight against COVID-19 should leave a longer-term legacy that better prepares humanity to more effectively deal with outbreaks and pandemics and—when possible—to prevent them at the source. 

Want to learn more? Please contact Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founder, Pandemic Action Network at [email protected]

 

The Next Pandemic Won’t Wait: An Agenda for Action to Strengthen Global Preparedness

While the world is focused on the COVID-19 response, we cannot afford to continue to ignore or delay action to bolster global preparedness for emerging pandemic threats. The Pandemic Action Network released a brief paper with topline recommendations from our Global Health Security Architecture working group urging world leaders to take steps now that will help prevent the next pandemic. Read the paper here.

GPMB to World Leaders: Now Will You Listen?

By Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founder Pandemic Action Network

 

We warned you, but you did not listen.  That’s the overarching message of the new report from the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB) entitled A World in Disorder.  In their inaugural report one year ago, the GPMB warned of the risk of a high impact, respiratory pathogen that could quickly spread around the globe.  Now in their latest report with a starker cover and a sterner title and narrative―much like parents admonishing their delinquent teenagers―the current and former global health elders that make up the GPMB are wagging their fingers and telling world leaders: you’re out of chances.

This year’s report echoes many of the main messages from last year’s (and from many other expert commissions in recent years), including: national political leadership is paramount; investing in preparedness is not only about saving lives, it’s about protecting economies; the impact―and hence the solutions―of pandemic preparedness go well beyond the health sector, and require a One Health approach; and no one in the world is safe until everyone is safe.

Four recommendations in the report that are particularly welcome:

The UN Secretary General should convene a UN Summit on Global Health Security with heads of state, the WHO Director General, and heads of the International Financial Institutions to forge a new international preparedness and response framework.

Create a new sustainable financing mechanism for global health security that incentivizes nations to prioritize preparedness and recognizes it as a global common good that should not be at the mercy of political and economic cycles.  This echoes the call of many of our Network partners for a Global Health Security Challenge Fund.

Amend the International Health Regulations (IHRs) to improve access to information and increase member state accountability beyond the scope of the current IHRs.  This will be politically fraught but unavoidable to drive the change necessary.

Finance global health R&D as a public good by building on the unprecedented international scientific collaboration around COVID-19 to create a sustainable, coordinated global R&D financing and delivery mechanism to facilitate rapid R&D for epidemic-risk and novel diseases and ensure that every country has an affordable and reliable pathway to secure vaccines, therapeutics, diagnostics, and other medical countermeasures for health emergencies when they need them.

Unfortunately (although not surprisingly), the request for a high-level summit was stripped from the omnibus COVID-19 resolution passed by this year’s UN General Assembly, a casualty of the highly polarized geopolitical environment. But advocates should not be deterred.  Such a summit to prioritize pandemics as a grave global security threat, secure high-level political commitments, and drive a new international consensus and accountability is the right call to action.  The Pandemic Action Network and our partners will be pressing world leaders to convene this summit before the end of 2021―this should happen as soon as possible after the Independent Panel on Preparedness and Response delivers its report to the World Health Assembly next May.  To ensure this results in meaningful change by governments and international institutions, the planning should get underway now.

Does this year’s GPMB report have a better chance than its predecessor to convince policymakers to act?  I am cautiously optimistic, for two reasons. First, its warning is no longer hypothetical. The COVID-19 pandemic is still unfolding before our eyes, with no end yet in sight, and it looks likely to get worse before it gets better as we see resurgences around the globe and flu season gets underway.  If there was ever a time that political leaders may be open to do something, this should be it.

Second, we now have a global advocacy effort focused on preparedness to take up these calls for action and hold national and global leaders to account.  GPMB co-chair As Sy, the former Secretary-General of the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, said we need “a global movement of solidarity” committed to inclusion, partnership and compassion to make the world safer from pandemics.  The Pandemic Action Network is dedicated to growing this movement: In a few short months we have brought together more than 40 organizations with global reach to drive collective action to end this pandemic and help prevent the next one.  And we are just getting started.

At the GPMB report launch, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, “If we do not learn these lessons now and take the steps necessary, when will we? This will not be the last pandemic or global health emergency.  Every day we stand by and do nothing is another day we come closer to the next disaster.  We don’t know what it will be, but we know it will come―and we must prepare.  When it comes to preparedness, our biggest obstacle is ourselves.”

The warnings are crystal clear. So, will leaders listen this time and do what is required to prepare for the next pandemic? The Pandemic Action Network is here to make sure they do.  Join us!

A hopeful EU Speech, a Disappointing G20 Communique – And Opportunities Ahead

By Eloise Todd, Co-Founder Pandemic Action Network

Following the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board’s report launch on Monday, this week also saw the European Commission (EC) President Ursula von der Leyen give her first State of the Union speech to a masked up, socially distanced European Parliamentary chamber and the G20 Joint Finance & Health Ministers’ meeting published their conclusions. What happened?

First, President von der Leyen’s speech on 16 September. Here are five announcements that could help the fight for a better prepared world and an equitable COVID-19 response:

1. Get ready for a Global Health Summit in 2021 focusing on lessons learned from this crisis. It will be co-hosted by the EU and the Italian G20 Presidency. President von der Leyen said “we need to strengthen our crisis preparedness and management of cross-border health threats.” The fact that this issue will be a priority for the Italian Presidency of the G20 is another huge plus.

2.The EC also wants the WHO changed “by design – not by destruction” to help build “a strong World Health Organisation that can better prepare and respond to global pandemics or local outbreaks – be it Corona or Ebola.” The WHO needs this kind of constructive approach towards reform.

3. Stronger EU health agencies – and a brand new ‘BARDA’. The European Medicines Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) will both be strengthened, and a brand new European agency will be created too – a Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency (BARDA) – to build Europe’s pandemic preparedness capacity and respond to cross- border threats and emergencies (from nature or terrorism).

4. No to vaccine nationalism, yes to vaccine cooperation, said the President loudly and clearly: “safe vaccines are available not only for those who can afford it – but for everyone who needs it.” The EU will have to walk the walk on this in its own vaccine dealings. The COVAX Facility was also mentioned, along with the €400mn the Commission pledged just last week – and the President surely knows that the EC will need to do more in the coming months to help close the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A)’s $38bn funding gap.

5. Last but definitely not least, the President carefully raised “the question of health competences” – suggesting that during its upcoming review of the EU’s Treaty basis, the Conference on the Future of Europe examine the powers the EU has on health policy in times of crisis. If the EU leads such a reform, it could open up Europe’s ability to act as a unit across the Union and possibly multilaterally in times of crisis.

Second, on 17 September was the G20 Ministerial outcome, which by contrast majored on warm words and not in concrete commitments. We are disappointed with the outcome, and have laid out three key points that need to be converted from abstract notions to clear directives in time for the G20 Leaders’ Summit in November:

The Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) were called upon to “swiftly consider ways to strengthen the financial support for countries’ access to COVID-19 tools.” The urgency of this support cannot be overstated; there is a $38bn funding gap in the ACT-A – $15bn of which must be found this year and the remaining secured by the end of the first quarter of 2021. Help from the MDBs is much needed – and the same kind of innovation by multilateral institutions that has helped countries deal with the impact of COVID-19 at home needs to be deployed to ensure an equitable crisis response.

Pandemic preparedness needs to shift from words to action. The communique included the Ministers “taking note” of developments, “looking forward” to the work of the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (which will not release its report until next May), and many other noncommittal statements. For inspiration as to concrete policies to pursue, they should read my colleague Carolyn Reynolds (Pandemic Action Network Co-Founder) and the Center for Strategic and International Studies’s J. Stephen Morrison’s piece on what the IPPR should do on pandemic preparedness.

There is still time for the G20 to make a difference. Ministers are updating the G20 Action Plan which will be presented at the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors’ meeting in October 2020, and then to the Leaders’ Summit itself in November. At the Pandemic Action Network we will be coordinating with our brilliant partners to ensure the Action Plan prioritizes strong and necessary measures to prevent and prepare our world for future outbreaks.

Leaders across the world need to move with urgency and speed to deliver concrete actions to make sure we end COVID-19 equitably and swiftly across the world, and take the actions needed on preparedness and prevention to make sure this can never happen again. If your organization wants to join the fight, please get in touch today. We have no time to lose.

 

Advice to the Independent Panel on Preparedness and Response

The planet is only nine months into the Covid-19 pandemic, yet the scramble has begun to digest the lessons learned and prescribe corrective actions. Earlier this week, the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board and the Lancet COVID-19 Commission each weighed in with recommendations. Eyes are now on the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response (IPPR), announced by the director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to the Covid-19 resolution approved by WHO member states in May. This week, the panel initiates its work with an ambitious timeline to submit interim findings to the next meeting of the World Health Assembly (WHA) in November and a final report next May.

Pandemic Action Network co-founder Carolyn Reynolds joins Steve Morrison, Senior Vice President and Director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, to provide advice to the Panel on how it can have the most impact on making the world safer from pandemics. Read their commentary here: https://www.csis.org/analysis/advice-independent-panel-pandemic-preparedness-and-response

Will EU Leaders Act as Pandemic Preventers at Their First Face-to-Face Meeting This Week?

Will EU leaders act as pandemic preventers at their first face-to-face meeting this week?

On 17-18 July, EU leaders will meet for their first face-to-face European Council meeting since the beginning of the pandemic. They will discuss the EU recovery plan to respond to the COVID-19 crisis and the next long-term EU budget.

As they meet in Brussels, European leaders must lead by example by covering their face to protect those around them and encourage all EU citizens to follow suit. In their negotiations, they must ensure that the global COVID-19 response and pandemic preparedness and prevention efforts are protected and even increased. Proposed cuts to Heading VI (external action envelope) must be rejected.

Face mask use results in a large reduction in risk of infection. In the absence of a vaccine or medicine to fight COVID-19, hand hygiene, social distancing and mask wearing are the best tools we have against the disease. A simple barrier over the mouth and nose, even one that’s homemade, can trap the respiratory droplets that an infected person may release (including asymptomatic and presymptomatic individuals) and hence stop the virus from traveling onto other people. EU leaders should set an example for their citizens and encourage them to cover their face in public to become pandemic preventers. Giving the advice to wear a mask or homemade cloth face covering costs nothing; not doing so costs lives.

As they discuss the EU’s COVID-19 recovery plan and next 7-year budget, EU leaders must protect vital support to the global response to COVID-19 under the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) and under the Humanitarian Aid Instrument. They must reject proposed cuts to EU aid in President Michel’s most recent negotiating box. EU Member States should endorse the Commission’s May 2020 proposal of €118 billion for Heading VI (external action envelope).        

They should also commit in the Council Conclusions to support the adoption of a global plan on pandemic preparedness and prevention to ensure that every country has the capacity to detect, prevent and respond to future outbreaks before they become deadly and costly pandemics and signal Europe’s willingness to invest billions today to save trillions tomorrow.

COVID-19 doesn’t recognise borders. Until we get rid of this disease globally everyone – including EU citizens – will be at risk. It is also essential that the world’s response to COVID-19 leaves a legacy for the future. Once and for all, we must break the deadly and costly cycle of panic and neglect that has left the world so vulnerable to pandemic threats.

What We Want to Hear from G20 Finance Ministers This Week: A Commitment to Invest Billions Today, to Save Trillions Tomorrow, and to Make It Equitable

Nobody had expected that 2020 would be the year of humanity’s worst crisis since World War II. Yet experts had repeatedly warned of the risk of a pandemic for over a decade, urging leaders to prioritise preparedness efforts. The majority of them simply didn’t listen, and when the first case of COVID-19 emerged, the world wasn’t prepared for it.

COVID-19 will not be the last new disease to appear and take advantage of our interconnected world to flourish. What we’ve been going through this year could (and will) happen again if we don’t invest in pandemic preparedness and prevention. Our leaders must not fail us another time. They must act now to prepare for a brighter and more resilient future for everyone, everywhere.

Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors from the G20 will be meeting this week. Here are three things they should commit to rid the world of COVID-19, deliver equitable access to innovations, and prevent future pandemics:

  • Close the funding gap to meet the ACT-Accelerator needs. The overall costs for the ACT-Accelerator published on 26 June are set at $31.3bn for the next 12 months, with an urgent funding need of $13.7bn, which the world needs to raise as soon as possible for crucial upstream investments. It is vital to provide the ACT-Accelerator with the funding it needs to secure urgent COVID-19 tools like vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics, invest in health systems strengthening and crucially get them to every corner of the world, regardless of personal or national wealth.
  • Urgently provide life-saving humanitarian assistance to Africa CDC and other regional humanitarian hubs to ensure frontline access to Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and other vital supplies in vulnerable countries with the greatest need.
  • Commit to an urgent, time-bound, transparent and credible process for the adoption and full financing of a global compact for pandemic preparedness and prevention. Once and for all, we must break the deadly and costly cycle of panic and neglect that has left the world so vulnerable to pandemic threats. We urgently need a plan to ensure that every country has the capacity to detect, prevent and respond to future outbreaks before they become deadly and costly pandemics.

 

COVID-19 is strongly imperiling progress towards the SDGs. The G20 must act fast to put to the world back on track and ensure no one is left behind.

The Wrong Decision for America and the World

July 14, 2020
By Carolyn Reynolds, Co-Founder, Pandemic Action Network

The wrong decision for America and the world

Last week, the Administration took the first formal step to initiate the US withdrawal from the World Health Organization (WHO). This decision will have huge negative consequences for America and the world – never more so than in the middle of a global pandemic.

Under the terms of the 1948 joint resolution of Congress authorizing membership in the WHO, there are two conditions for a US withdrawal: a one-year notice – on which the clock is now ticking – and full payment of outstanding US financial obligations, or assessed contributions, which currently total $203 million – $120 million for Fiscal Year 2020 and $83 million unpaid from Fiscal Year 2019.

More than ever, America needs the WHO, and the WHO needs America – its largest donor and most powerful member. Here is a brief look at how membership in the WHO serves America’s interests:

First, the pandemic has laid bare how infectious disease outbreaks anywhere in the world can quickly spread and put American lives and livelihoods at risk. Until there is a vaccine, no country will be safe. Ending the pandemic requires a united global effort, in which WHO plays an indispensable role. From providing technical guidance on proven public health interventions to coordinating international efforts to accelerate research, development and universal access to a COVID vaccine and therapeutics, countries around the world trust WHO and rely on its expertise to lead the COVID-19 response. The WHO-coordinated Action for Covid Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and Solidarity Trial are unprecedented global efforts that will increase the likelihood of ending the pandemic faster.

Second, WHO has led global efforts to combat a host of other infectious disease threats. The eradication of smallpox in 1980, which killed an estimated 300 million people in the 20th century, is one of WHO’s greatest achievements. With sustained WHO leadership, the world is now extremely close to eradicating polio, down to just 176 cases worldwide in 2019. US political support and funding has been vital to this effort, and withdrawal could stall efforts to end this debilitating scourge to humanity. International efforts to fight influenza, HIV/AIDS, malaria, measles, and tuberculosis all depend heavily on the WHO – with US cooperation and funding – for support.

Third, WHO provides the backbone for the world’s infectious disease early warning system. Working closely with experts from the US Centers for Disease Control and the Agency for International Development, and through the Joint External Evaluations and oversight of the technical support, WHO helps governments assess their preparedness gaps and mobilize early detection and response efforts. US withdrawal will hobble WHO’s capacity and leave a major hole in our common global defense to pandemic threats, which are on the rise.

As of this writing, several Members of Congress (not enough!) had spoken up against the decision, among them retiring Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN):

“Certainly there needs to be a good, hard look at mistakes the World Health Organization might have made in connection with coronavirus, but the time to do that is after the crisis has been dealt with, not in the middle of it. Withdrawing U.S. membership could, among other things, interfere with clinical trials that are essential to the development of vaccines, which citizens of the United States as well as others in the world need. And withdrawing could make it harder to work with other countries to stop viruses before they get to the United States. If the administration has specific recommendations for reforms of the WHO, it should submit those recommendations to Congress, and we can work together to make those happen.”

Both WHO and the US have many lessons to learn from this pandemic. WHO’s emergency response capacity has improved considerably in recent years, but there’s widespread consensus that additional reforms are needed. In May, WHO member states approved a resolution to conduct an impartial, independent and comprehensive review, and WHO Director-General Tedros announced that Former Liberian President and Former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark will co-chair the panel. Among the many issues they will need to examine is WHO’s funding model and its limited ability to compel member states to act, including review of the International Health Regulations. The reality is that WHO is only as effective as its members allow it to be – and particularly its largest donor.

The health and security case for US membership and support for WHO is clear – and leaving WHO or trying to set up an alternative body will only serve to further erode US influence on the global stage. The decision to withdraw could be revoked at any time before the one-year deadline; presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden has said that if he were to become President he would reverse the decision on day one. But this should never be a partisan issue.  The US should stay in and use its might to ensure a stronger WHO – to end this pandemic and help prevent the next one.

What We Want to See Happen on June 27: A Bold Plan to Make Sure This Never Happens Again!

As the world continues its long fight against COVID-19, world leaders have repeatedly signaled their strong commitment to global health. The Gavi replenishment summit, where US$8.8 billion were raised to help immunise millions of children and strengthen health systems in the poorest countries, was the last of a series of events that helped mobilise crucial funds to help the poorest countries cope with COVID-19. But this is not enough.

World leaders will gather again at the Global Goal: Unite For Our Future Summit on June 27. At the Pandemic Action Network, we’ve called on leaders to build on the success of the Gavi replenishment and previous pledging moments to go much bolder to make sure we don’t repeat the errors of the past. They must seize the opportunity of June 27 to ensure the world has the resources and efficient, inclusive mechanisms necessary to rid the world of COVID-19, deliver equitable access to innovations, as well as to develop a plan alongside this vital work to prevent future pandemics.

To do that, leaders must urgently commit to a time-bound, transparent and credible process for the adoption of a global, cost plan for pandemic preparedness. Once and for all, we must break the deadly and costly cycle of panic and neglect that has left the world so vulnerable to pandemic threats. Wealthy countries must step up support to the poorest countries to make the necessary investments in national health security action plans and more resilient health systems in support of the most marginalised communities. Every country must have the capacity to detect, prevent and respond to future outbreaks before they become deadly and costly pandemics – so the world does not repeat the death and economic devastation we have seen in 2020.

World leaders must also ensure that all COVID-19 response tools and initiatives are global and equitable. Any plan being launched on the production, distribution and purchasing of possible future vaccines and drugs need to have universal access and equity at their heart. It is vital that developing countries have a place as equal partners in both ACT/A and the new EU Alliance on vaccines that will be announced tomorrow. It is also crucial that marginalised and vulnerable groups, health care workers and other key workers, those living in LMICs, LICs and those in COVID-19 hotspots are prioritised when vaccines are rolled out.

World leaders must live up to their commitments to work for global solutions to this crisis, leaving no one behind, as well as to start treating pandemics as the existential security threat they are. Not only is that the right thing to do ethically, but it is also in the self-interest of each citizen and every nation, because no one will be safe until everyone is safe.

This is what we are asking for from world leaders, and we will be asking them to deliver on June 27 and start the process towards making our world resilient against future pandemics.

Break the Cycle of Panic and Neglect: Preventing the Next Pandemic

Time for unprecedented international cooperation say global health organizations

In the wake of the US decision to terminate the relationship with the World Health Organization (WHO), Pandemic Action Network and leading global health organizations have published a brief paper outlining some of the critical steps that the world needs to take to prevent pandemics.

The report sets out a key challenge for global leaders to work together in an unprecedented way to end COVID-19 as swiftly as possible and prepare for future pandemic threats.

The report, published jointly by the Pandemic Action Network, ONE, PATH, Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), Global Health Security Agenda Consortium (GHSAC), Management Sciences for Health (MSH) and Global Citizen highlights how years of ‘panic and neglect’ in the international health system has led to inadequate preparedness for pandemics in every country, resulting in the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives to COVID-19. Among the report’s recommendations is to strengthen WHO. Read the report HERE.

Pandemic Action Network’s Support for WHO Statement

Pandemic Action Network believes that the world needs a strong World Health Organization both to stop this pandemic and to help ensure every country is better prepared to manage future pandemic threats.  No country is safe from pandemics until every country is safe.  The world is in the midst of the biggest public health crisis in a generation, and global solidarity and collaboration is needed more than ever. US involvement is needed to support and strengthen the World Health Organization to help tackle future pandemics.

The health and safety of Americans – and people around the world – depend on it.  We hope that all countries, including the US, will soon be able to unite to tackle this crisis and prevent future pandemics, and to strengthen and improve the WHO to the benefit of us all.

The Network’s Initial Reaction to the European Commission’s Recovery Plan: Promising Signs for Pandemic Preparedness – Now for a Broader, Global Resilience Agenda

This week the European Commission put forward a proposal for a major recovery plan for the EU. The EU decided to reboot its 7-year budget proposal in light of the COVID19 crisis. The overall Multiannual Financial Framework covers the funding period from 2021-2027 and was boosted by an additional €715 billion to €1.85 trillion – including a €750 billion ‘Next Generation EU’ recovery fund – gave us all a glimmer of hope for tomorrow.

At the Pandemic Action Network, we are focused on securing long-term solutions to resolving this COVID19 crisis so that future pandemics can be prevented.

Here are the 10 things we’ll be watching in the EU’s newly proposed recovery plan:

  1. A new standalone programme for pandemic prevention and preparedness – The Commission is proposing to create a new EU4Health programme, with a budget of €9.4 billion to invest in prevention and crisis preparedness and help deliver well-performing and resilient public health systems. Although it represents only a small proportion of the overall plan, having a pot of money dedicated to strengthening health security and prepare for future health crises is a major step forward.
  2. A new Resilience and Crisis Response budget: The EU4Health is part of a new resilience and crisis response budget line alongside security and defense, under a renamed ‘Heading 5: Resilience, Security and Defence’ (previously ‘Security and Defense’). The Resilience and Crisis Response budget sees a big boost with an additional €12.8 billion, totalling €14 billion (the majority of which will come from the Next Generation EU funding). Also, under this budget line, RescEU, the Union’s Civil Protection Mechanism, gets an extra €1.9 billion, to €3.1 billion, to better prepare for and respond to future crises.
  3. A Commitment to international cooperation and common solutions for all – The EU is committed to support the global response to Covid-19, including by ensuring universal and affordable access to treatment, testing and any future vaccine. The plan proposes an additional €6.78 billion for the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDCI), to €86 billion, and another €5 billion for humanitarian assistance, reaching €14.8 billion.
  4. Creativity in finding new resources. The Commission will use its strong credit rating (and temporarily raise the EU’s own resources ceilings) to exceptionally borrow up to €750 billion in low interest loans at long maturities on the market. It will then channel borrowed funds (partly recycled as grants) to regions and sectors most vulnerable to COVID-19 in Europe and for pandemic preparedness and prevention. In addition, in order to make funds available as soon as possible, the Commission proposes to amend the current budget (covering 2014-2020) to make an additional €11.5 billion available already this year.
  5. European medicines agency– The Commission will propose to strengthen the European Medicines Agency in monitoring production and supply of essential medicines in the EU to avoid shortages.
  6. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC): It will also give a stronger role for the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) in coordinating surveillance, preparedness and response to health crises.
  7. More flexible emergency reserves for better crisis management. The Commission is proposing to create EU-level reserves of essential supplies and equipment to be mobilised in response to major emergencies and to strengthen its emergency financing tools (such as the EU Solidarity Fund, the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund, and the Solidarity and Emergency Aid Reserve) and make them more flexible to enable a rapid response to crises both within and outside the EU. Together, these instruments would provide for up to EUR 21 billion in additional emergency financing.
  8. Better and simplified regulation – The Commission will set up the ‘Fit-for-Future Platform’ involving all stakeholders to simplify and modernise EU legislation to alleviate unnecessary regulatory burden. The Commission will also present a Communication on Better Regulation later this year to ensure law and policy making are based on robust evidence and assessments.
  9. Investment in research and innovation. The Commission is proposing to reinforce ‘Horizon Europe’ by €7.8 billion, to €94.4 billion, to scale up vital research in health, resilience and the green and digital transitions.
  10. Fight Infodemics. The Commission plans to address disinformation challenges linked to the pandemic and build resilience for the future.

It’s now down to the European Parliament and the 27 Member States to carry on negotiations and reach an agreement on the long-term budget to equip the EU with the right tools to fight this pandemic and prepare for the next.

These initiatives are a great show of leadership from the EU to develop a resilience budget that can prepare us for future crises. PAN will be working with partners to make sure this proposal is protected, and even strengthened, in the negotiations between Member States and the European Parliament. PAN will also work to ensure the same kind of plan is adopted in other countries and at the global level, in particular resilience budgets and standalone mechanisms for pandemic preparedness. In addition, President Von der Leyen announced today that extra funds for international cooperation will be raised at a Global Pledging Summit on 27 June backed by the European Commission, 15 countries so far, and delivered by Global Citizen and partners.

Other countries and organisations should also explore innovative ways to raise funding for the global effort, to ensure the poorest countries can also fight this pandemic and be ready for the next. No-one is safe until everyone is safe

All figures are in 2018 constant prices

Background Information

The Commission is putting forward a two-fold plan totalling €1.85 trillion

  • Reinforced long-term EU budget (known as the Multiannual Financial Framework, or ‘MFF’) for 2021-2027 (€1 100 billion)
  • ‘Next Generation EU’ to boost the EU budget with new financing raised on the financial markets for 2021-2024 (€750 billion)

The money from Next Generation EU will be invested across three pillars, through €500 billion in grants and €250 billion in loans to Member States.

  1. Supporting Member States to recover
  2. Kick-starting the economy and helping private investment
  3. Learning the lessons from the crisis (including pandemic preparedness and prevention)

Proposed timeline:

  • May 27, 2020: Commission proposal for the revised Multiannual Financial Framework 2014-2020 & 2021-2027 and Own Resources Decision + sectoral legislation
  • July 1, 2020: German Presidency of the EU begins
  • By July 2020: European Council: Political agreement on Multiannual Financial Framework 2014-2020 & 2021-2027 and Own Resources Decision
  • By summer 2020: European Parliament’s consultation on Own Resources Decision
  • Early autumn 2020: Adoption of the revised Multiannual Financial Framework 2014-2020 + corresponding sectoral legislation
  • October 2020: European Council
  • December 2020: Adoption of the revised Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027 (European Parliament’s consent) Adoption of the Own Resources Decision (Ratification by all Member States in line with their constitutional requirements)
  • January 1, 2021: Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027 implementation starts

More information here:

 

Global Advocacy and Communications Effort Launched to Drive Action Against COVID-19 and Stop Future Pandemics

South Africa’s Rugby World Cup Winning Captain Siya Kolisi kickstarts behavior change efforts “For Humankind”; calls on other stars from sports and screen to continue to rally around protective actions, like #MaskingForAFriend

April 22, 2020, Seattle, WA – A network of leading international organizations announced today the creation of an advocacy initiative to ignite a global movement to help accelerate an end to the COVID-19 pandemic and enhance our preparedness to stop future pandemics. The Pandemic Action Network will advocate for policy changes and increased support and resources to ensure countries are better prepared to prevent, detect and respond to pandemic threats. This initiative will also host “For Humankind”, a new effort to promote accurate information to ensure people around the world understand what they need to do to protect themselves and their communities from COVID-19.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the extreme fragility in the ability of the world’s systems to respond to a new and highly infectious pathogen. While public health experts have been making this case for years, there has not been complementary policy, advocacy and communications support to create the political will necessary for policy and funding changes to enhance our preparedness.

This effort is being created with support from founding members the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Johnson & Johnson, in addition to the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and Schmidt Futures. The Network will initially comprise of a dedicated and highly experienced secretariat and key advocacy leaders in Seattle, Washington DC, Brussels, London and Beijing. They will work in partnership with individuals and organizations around the world to advance a robust policy and advocacy agenda.

The Pandemic Action Network will steer this shared agenda, with three overarching objectives:

  • Ensure full funding for the global and country-level COVID-19 response and future pandemic preparedness 
  • Strengthen the global health security architecture for more effective pandemic preparedness and response
  • Accelerate research, development and access to innovations to combat COVID-19 and emerging pandemic threats

A core principle of the Pandemic Action Network is that ‘no one is safe until everyone is safe,’ meaning an equitable global lens is crucial for a successful response. “West Africa’s devastating Ebola epidemic showed us that the world must come together to ensure countries are prepared for outbreaks, including that health workers on the frontlines have the gear and training they need to keep safe and keep serving,” said Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former President of Liberia and World Health Organization Goodwill Ambassador for Health Workforce. “Decisive political leadership and global cooperation will determine if we win the war against this invisible enemy, which is why we need the Pandemic Action Network.”

The Pandemic Action Network will be counseled by an international expert advisory council that will initially include Professor Peter Piot, currently director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and previously founding executive director of UNAIDS and the co-discoverer of the Ebola virus, and Dr. Judy Monroe, head of the CDC Foundation, an independent nonprofit that mobilizes philanthropic and private-sector resources to support the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s work; among others. Additional experts will be announced.

“It’s critical that the philanthropic, public and private sectors work together to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Judy Monroe, MD, president and CEO of the CDC Foundation. “And it’s clear that a coordinated effort is needed to prepare for, and hopefully prevent, the next pandemic. The CDC Foundation is pleased to join the Pandemic Action Network in this goal.”

Private sector support for the Network is led by founding member Johnson & Johnson. The company has been actively engaged in fighting pandemics for more than a century, first introducing the epidemic mask in 1919 to help contain the Spanish Flu. In January it rapidly mobilized its scientific expertise and extensive partnerships to tackle COVID-19. “While we focus on stopping COVID-19 now we must also keep one eye to the future and ensure we are learning from this experience and applying those lessons.  Effective, sustained and coordinated advocacy about the policy and system reforms necessary to prevent future outbreaks will be critical to ensure this happens,” said Adrian Thomas, M.D., Vice President, Global Public Health at Johnson & Johnson. “That’s why the world needs the Pandemic Action Network.”

The Pandemic Action Network will also serve as a hub for expert global communications efforts to amplify public health messaging needed to help stop the spread of COVID-19. Its first digital communications campaign, #MaskingForAFriend, will amplify consistent, accurate messaging endorsed by leading public health officials to make sure people know how to protect themselves and others from COVID-19 by using homemade cloth face coverings.

“Everyone has a part to play in protecting the public’s health. We all have agency,” said Dr. Harvey Fineberg, president of the Moore Foundation. “We can use our ingenuity and know-how to reduce everyone’s risk of exposure, create better ways of meeting social needs, reduce the burden of disease, and overcome the dislocation and hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The campaign will initially launch in the United States and South Africa to help increase understanding on the need to use cloth face coverings in public, along with continuing other protective measures like social distancing and handwashing. The Pandemic Action Network will provide an open source global platform for public health messages and materials to be used worldwide. Planned expansions include India and countries in Africa, Europe and South America.

Siya Kolisi, captain of South Africa’s Rugby Team, kicked off the effort, calling on the public in both countries to wear a mask outside their homes to protect others from contracting the virus. Siya, and other influencers like Andy Cohen and Annie Potts, have started posting about how they are #MaskingForAFriend. They also encourage others to join the movement by spreading the word about wearing homemade masks, and sharing a selfie image or video wearing a cloth face covering during essential errands or making masks using the hashtag #MaskingForAFriend.

“I am proud to use my platform to share accurate health information with as many people as possible to help stop this virus in its tracks,” said Kolisi. “As a captain, I now call on other sports leaders to model good protective behavior – whether it be staying home, washing hands or covering your face. We need to do it ‘For Humankind.’”

The Pandemic Action Network is composed of experienced leaders in global advocacy, policy and communications based around the world. It is the brainchild of Gabrielle Fitzgerald (CEO, Panorama), Carolyn Reynolds (Distinguished Fellow with The George Institute for Global Health and Senior Associate with the Global Health Policy Center at CSIS), Eloise Todd (formerly of ONE Campaign and Best for Britain) and David Kyne (CEO of Evoke KYNE, a firm that specializes in international behavior change communications activities, including past efforts during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa). They will be joined by Greg Propper from social impact firm Propper Daley.

“We have known for many years that a pandemic could occur at any point,” said Gabrielle Fitzgerald, CEO of Panorama, a Seattle-based action tank, and co-founder of Pandemic Action Network. “As we continue to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, we must build and sustain political will to ensure that policies are put in place, and funding is made available, to ensure all countries are better prepared for the next outbreak.”

The growing list of multilateral organizations, private companies, foundations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector joining the Network include the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, CDC Foundation, Evoke, Evoke KYNE, Federation of American Scientists, Global Citizen, Global Health Strategies, Global Health Technologies Coalition, Goodbye Malaria, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, iHeart Media, Johnson & Johnson, Last Mile Health, Management Sciences For Health, NTI (Nuclear Threat Initiative), ONE Campaign, PATH, Panorama, Project Everyone, Propper Daley, Schmidt Futures, The Kolisi Foundation, UN Foundation, Wellcome and #PlayAPartTogether, a group of more than 70 gaming companies.

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Media contacts:

Jessica Ross (US)

[email protected]  

+1-267-254-5577

 

Harriet Mooney (UK)

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