Call for G20 Leaders to Take Pandemic Action

Ahead of this year’s G20 Leaders’ Summit, over 50 global, regional, national, and local organizations are calling on leaders to put forward actions that ensure everyone has the tools to curb COVID-19 and prevent future pandemics. As health crises continue to set development progress back, impact our economies, and undermine the world’s ability to tackle other global challenges, joint and coordinated measures, policies, and investments remain urgent and necessary. 

While Indonesia’s G20 Presidency has advanced key agreements and proposals on PPR — such as the new Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (known as the Pandemic Fund) — there are further opportunities within reach for breaking the cycle of “panic and neglect” on pandemics. The Annual Meetings provide a critical opportunity to reassert leadership, deliver finance at scale, and kick-start the package of measures needed to pandemic-proof our world. 

Specifically, the group of organizations call on G20 Leaders to:

  • Deliver finance at scale for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).
    1. Channel US$100 billion in special drawing rights (SDRs) to the IMF’s Resilience and Sustainability Trust (RST).
    2. Release a roadmap to unlock new lending from multilateral development banks (MDBs).
  • Invest in pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response — with equity at its heart.
    1. Meet the Pandemic Fund’s US$10.5 billion target and advance a sustainable funding plan.
    2. Fund the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) 2.0, FIND — the global alliance for diagnostics — and public health institutes.
    3. Fund and support the Global Fund, Gavi, and other organizations also crucial to PPR. 
  • Prevent and prepare for the next pandemic by fixing gaps in the system and in policies.
    1. Endorse the creation of a high-level body to tackle global health threats and advance its set up through the UN High-Level Meeting for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response in 2023.
    2. Ensure equitable access to pandemic countermeasures and initiate a process to address this gap now and for the future
    3. Reinforce the importance of a One Health approach.

Outbreaks can be prevented, and new pathogens can be contained — but ongoing pandemics are a political choice. Decisive leadership can deliver a path to health security for people worldwide, where most outbreaks can be prevented, and new pathogens can be contained. We already know the solutions and investments required. Against the consequences and harm of pandemics, their cost is not only modest but is also much less considering the human, economic, and health dividends they reap. 

Read the full letter. If your organization would like to sign the letter to G20 Leaders, please reach out to Aminata

 

The Pandemic Fund Action Hub

 

The Pandemic Fund Action Hub

Track, Analyze, Engage

On June 30, 2022, the World Bank’s Board approved the establishment of a new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) to mobilize new investments that strengthen pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (PPR) capacities at national, regional, and global levels, with a strong focus on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Such a decision — supported by multiple countries and experts — is a crucial step towards a future where pandemics no longer represent a global existential threat.

This nascent Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (Pandemic Fund) was established on September 8, 2022, after a group of founding donors agreed on the minimum necessary aspects for its operation. The World Bank hosts the Fund’s secretariat with support from the World Health Organization. Further work and agreements are required to ensure this new financial instrument will deliver on its transformative promise to make the world safer from pandemics. Among these are its focus and scope, structure, operations, governance, and financing, which experts estimate needs to reach a minimum of US$10 billion annually.

Since the process of designing and establishing the Pandemic Fund is moving swiftly, Pandemic Action Network has set up this dynamic resource hub to organize and facilitate access to relevant information. Moreover, this Action Hub aims to inform our partners and any civil society group about key developments and opportunities to mobilize, collaborate and shape the Pandemic Fund’s design and future operations.

Key documents

In this section, you will find public and official documents related to the governance and operation of the Pandemic Fund. Some of them can be preliminary versions or drafts under review by the Fund’s Governing Board.

Fund Pledge Tracker

Pandemic Action Network and the ONE Campaign are keeping a record of the pledges made to the Pandemic Fund. The goal is to better understand its funding sources and sustainability and to promote transparency and accountability through regular monitoring.

Access the Pandemic Fund’s Pledge Tracker

Civil Society Organization (CSO) Consultation Process

For this new Pandemic Fund to be successful and sustainable — and achieve its transformative promise to make the world safer from pandemics — there must be an inclusive approach to the current design process. CSOs must have room to inform the design, governance, priorities, and stand-up process. While we are supportive of the promise of the Fund, CSOs and low- and middle-income countries should be co-creators and decision-makers at every step of the Fund’s design and operation in order to ensure its success. Evidence from other mechanisms where CSOs have played an active role shows their involvement and contributions strengthen their functioning and enhance participation, accountability, and representation of affected communities. 

To catalyze needed progress toward meaningful inclusion, Pandemic Action Network, together with partners, the Center for Indonesia’s Strategic Development Initiatives (CISDI), the Eastern Africa National Networks of AIDS Service Organisations (EANNASO), and WACI Health, managed the official CSO consultation process to the Fund ahead of its establishment.

🗓️ Upcoming Sessions

    • None scheduled; please check back.

📚 Previous Consultation Outcomes

    • October 14, Civil Society & Communities Town Hall: Feedback from October 7, 2022 Pandemic Fund Board Meeting
      The Town Hall provided a readout of the October meeting of the Pandemic Fund Governing Board meeting on October 7, shared updates on decisions taken, tasks ahead, and invited feedback, reflections, and priority-sharing from civil society and community colleagues. The Town Hall also provided updates on formally establishing an active civil society and communities constituency, as well as a Civil Society Technical Working Group to facilitate regular, proactive channels for information sharing, and increase opportunities for experts from civil society and communities to inform technical decision-making around the Fund. 

      Readout & Notes

    • September 15, Civil Society & Communities Town Hall: Feedback from First Pandemic Fund Board Meeting
      During this meeting, interim civil society Board Members Jackline Njeri Kiarie and Elisha Dunn-Georgiou, along with alternate Board Members Nitish Debnath and Olya Golichenko, provided a readout of the first meeting of the Pandemic Fund Governing Board meeting (Sept. 8-9), shared updates on decisions and tasks ahead, and gathered feedback from civil society and communities colleagues.

      Presentation Deck (Sept. 15) | Readout & Notes

    • August 30 & 31, Second Round Consultations | Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages
      This document summarizes the discussions from August 30 and 31 and presents the ideas and recommendations emphasized by CSO participants on the scope and priorities of the PPR FIF. Annexes contain meeting notes, attendee information, and written feedback.

      Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages (Aug 30/31)

    • August 16 & 17, First Round Consultations | Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages
      This document summarizes the discussions from August 16 and 17 and presents crucial ideas and recommendations emphasized by multiple participants on three issues: governing board, civil society engagement, and technical advisory panel. Annexes also contain meeting notes and written feedback provided.

      Summary of Proceedings and Key Messages (Aug 16/17)

📹 Recordings

👥 Participation

Additional figures will be provided soon.

Interim CSO Representatives for the PPR FIF Governing Board

📢 Call for Nominations

Founding contributors in the new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (PPR) reached an agreement that its Governing Board should include two voting seats for civil society organization (CSO) representatives. Pandemic Action Network, the Center for Indonesia’s Strategic Development Initiatives (CISDI), the Eastern Africa National Networks of AIDS Service Organisations (EANNASO), and the Platform for ACT-A Civil Society & Community Representatives initiated a civil society-led selection process and issued a global call for nominations to select two interim CSO representatives for the PPR FIF Governing Board on August 26, 2022.

This interim selection process took place on an abbreviated timeframe to ensure that the interim CSO representatives could participate in the first Governing Board meeting, scheduled for September 8-9, 2022. The application deadline was September 2, 12 pm ET, and the eligibility criteria and nomination form remain available for anyone interested.

👥 Selection Committee

The group of organizations and networks facilitating the civil society-led selection process believed it was key that the composition of the Selection Committee reflected regional and thematic diversity. With this in mind, the group agreed to integrate it with seven (7) members. They were:

    • Ashley Arabasadi, Management Sciences for Health
    • Harjyot Khosa, International Planned Parenthood Federation (South Asia Regional Office)
    • Lizzie Otaye, EANNASO
    • Mike Podmore, Platform for ACT-A Civil Society & Community Representatives/STOPAIDS
    • Nahashon Aluoka, Pandemic Action Network
    • Neil Vora, Conservation International/PPATS Coalition
    • Olivia Herlinda, CISDI

⏱️ Timeline

👤 Selected Representatives

On behalf of the Selection Committee, we are pleased to announce that Jackline Njeri Kiarie (Amref Health Africa — Global South) and Elisha Dunn-Georgiou (Global Health Council — Global North) were selected as interim civil society representatives for the new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (PPR) Governing Board. Nitish Debnath (One Health Bangladesh) and Olya Golichenko (Frontline AIDS, United Kingdom) will act as alternates. They have all accepted their positions.

This process has aimed to ensure that a diversity of civil society experience, global perspectives, and regional representation inform PPR FIF decision-making, starting from the first meeting of the Fund’s Governing Board, scheduled for September 8-9. These representatives will serve for an interim period of approximately six months until full-term CSO representatives are named through a longer-term, civil society-led selection process. 

While ensuring interim CSO representatives are in place for this week’s first PPR FIF Governing Board meeting required an extremely abbreviated timeframe, 66 submissions were received from 27 countries during the one-week open call for nominations. We are confident that the selected individuals will be strong representatives of the diversity of global civil society, advocate determinedly for community voices and priorities in the PPR space, and collectively demonstrate the vital and constructive role of civil society in global decision-making.

Analysis & Resources

Closing the Gap: Pandemic Fund Tracker

Acting on the lessons learned from the COVID-19 crisis and the recommendations of several expert panels — including the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response and the G20 High-Level Independent Panel on Financing the Global Commons — the World Bank’s Board approved on June 30, 2022, the establishment of a new Financial Intermediary Fund (FIF) to mobilize new investments to strengthen pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (PPR) capacities at national, regional, and global levels, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). 

This nascent FIF for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response (Pandemic Fund) is currently under design. Its strength and potential will depend on its vision, focus, structure, and governance — including transparency and inclusivity in all design and decision-making processes — as well as robust and sustainable funding, which experts estimate needs to reach a minimum of US$10.5 billion annually. 

Now is the time for leaders from around the world to support the Pandemic Fund so that it can deliver on its promise of addressing critical gaps in pandemic PPR and strengthening country-level capacity. Support from a broader base of countries — as well as from philanthropies and the private sector — is necessary for cementing sustained, global investments in pandemic preparedness as a global public good that bring tangible benefits to all and prevent another deadly and costly pandemic. But to fulfill the Fund’s mission, contributions must also be truly additional to financial commitments for other global health and development priorities and programs

Based on publicly-available information and intelligence gathered through our Networks, this tracker aims to record pledges made to the Pandemic Fund, with the goal of better understanding funding sources and sustainability, and promoting transparency and accountability through regular tracking.

Access the Tracker’s Data

Summary Analysis

Last updated December 1, 2022

As of today, the World Bank (WB) claims the Pandemic Fund has raised pledges of US$1.6 billion. So far, we have identified US$1.41 billion that has been publicly announced. Further contributions amounting to US$8.9 billion are needed to reach the US$10.5 billion per year baseline experts have estimated necessary. However, the exact annual financing gap is likely larger considering some contributions announced are multi-annual. The World Bank has not yet disclosed specific data to come up with a more accurate figure. 

19 donors 15 governments, 3 philanthropic organizations, 1 nonprofit organization, and 0 private sector organizations have pledged to the Pandemic Fund. According to the World Bank, seven additional donors committed to contributing, but their pledges have not been announced. 

While it is crucial that as many countries as possible contribute to the Pandemic Fund, G20 and OECD members are essential donors. Because of their roles globally, these countries must set an example in contributing to and sustaining global public goods, such as pandemic preparedness and response. The following map shows the pledge status of such a group of countries.

Financial Intermediary Fund for Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness, and Response Tracker (Pandemic Fund)

Is the tracker's data accurate and up to date? If not, do not hesitate to share any intel or modification suggestions with us.

Methodology

  • Included pledges have been verified either by a government or multilateral website, and/or the World Bank, and/or a credible top-tier news outlet.
  • “Additionality” is defined as additional to existing global health and development spending — the term is used to qualify that the financial resources pledged are new compared to other financial resources already committed to global health, international aid, or other funding mechanisms. Donor-specific budget rules are also considered in the assessment.

More about the Pandemic Fund

Call to Action! Accelerating an Effective and Equitable COVID-19 Response and Pandemic-proofing the Future

We are at a pivotal moment in the COVID-19 pandemic. With only 14% of people in low-income countries vaccinated with at least one dose, progress against the disease is at risk. Equitable access to vaccines, tests, and treatments remains elusive, compromising the health of millions of people, increasing the chances of more deadly variants, and endangering recovery. Now Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has brought a new security challenge, further threatening global health and safety. The humanitarian crisis in Ukraine and looming food and energy emergencies will continue to strain economies, people, and systems — not only in Europe, but also in other regions where progress against COVID-19 is still fragile.  

The convergence of different security crises with a still-present COVID-19 emergency will only deepen global suffering unless world leaders act urgently. It is essential that G7, G20, and all leaders not retreat from COVID-19 and acknowledge that ending this pandemic remains critical to the world’s security and stability. It is the time to double down and finish this solvable crisis — before the world is faced with a more transmissible or deadly variant, or even a novel pathogen. 

Together with nearly 30 partners, Pandemic Action Network calls on leaders to revamp their response to the pandemic in upcoming Summits and global coordination meetings taking place in 2022 and stay the course and secure the future, by prioritizing the following actions:

  1. Accelerate equitable access to and acceptance of vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics
  2. Provide new, diversified funding to fill country-identified gaps in response and preparedness
  3. Build now to pandemic proof the future

Read the full call to action here

This call to action is open for sign-ons. Please email Hanna if you’d like to add your organization. 

Civil Society Organizations Call on G20 Leaders and Ministers to Deliver Concrete Action on Global COVID-19 Targets

Ahead of the G20 Finance and Health Ministers Meeting on Oct. 29 and the G20 Leaders’ Summit on Oct. 30-31, Pandemic Action Network and more than 20 civil society partners call upon the G20 countries to deliver specific, concrete action on key targets set out at the Global COVID-19 Summit on Sept. 22. The Global COVID-19 Summit rallied world leaders and secured commitments to ensure at least 70% of the population in all income categories in all countries are fully vaccinated by mid 2022 — and at least 40% by the end of this year.

But meeting this target will require specific, concrete action. Civil society organizations urge the G20 leaders and Ministers to agree on a plan of action in the forthcoming meetings to deliver on these targets, including commitments to:

  1. Ensure at least 70% of people in every income category in every country are fully vaccinated by sharing doses at scale, releasing production slots, and supporting non-exclusive knowledge and technology sharing measures;
  2. Increase multi-year financing for the pandemic response and preparedness in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to match the scale of need;
  3. Reallocate Special Drawing Rights to support the fight against the pandemic in LMICs;
  4. Strengthen global leadership and accountability.

Humanity deserves a world where every country is equipped to end the COVID-19 crisis and every country is prepared to stop infectious disease outbreaks from becoming deadly and costly pandemics. Read the full letter.

If your organization would like to endorse the letter, please contact Aminata Wurie by Tuesday, Oct. 26. 

Calling on World Leaders for a Global Summit to End the COVID-19 Pandemic

A global pandemic needs a global plan of attack.

A coalition of 80 global leaders and over 25 organizations across corporate, philanthropic, civil society, advocacy, academic, and health sectors is calling on world leaders attending the United Nations General Assembly to convene a global summit to ignite an urgent global action plan to end the pandemic.

This call-to-action was coordinated by the COVID Collaborative, Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, Duke Global Health Innovation Center, Duke Global Health Institute, and the Pandemic Action Network.

Read the full letter to world leaders here.

Calling for a New Multilateral Financing Mechanism for Global Health Security and Pandemic Preparedness

People and countries around the world continue to suffer from the devastating human, economic, and social costs of being unprepared for a deadly pandemic like COVID-19. This crisis is a call-to-action. World leaders must seize this opportunity to leave a legacy of a healthier and safer world — starting with a new global financing mechanism that provides robust and sustained investments in pandemic prevention and preparedness. At the 2021 United Nations General Assembly, world leaders should launch a 100-day action plan to establish and resource a new financing mechanism, or Fund, that can mobilize at least US$10 billion annually over the next five years to bolster global health security and pandemic preparedness. History has shown time and again that if action is not taken during a crisis, then political will dissipates once the crisis fades from view. An expedited timeline for establishing the Fund will provide a critical new tool for the ongoing COVID-19 response efforts and create continuity between the pandemic response and recovery activities while bridging to escalated and sustained efforts on pandemic preparedness.  This policy brief, prepared by contributors from the Center for Global Development, Pandemic Action Network, and Nuclear Threat Initiative, is intended to inform and guide ongoing conversations among governments and non-governmental stakeholders on the parameters and design of the new Fund and action plan. Read the policy brief here.

This policy brief, prepared by contributors from the Center for Global Development, Pandemic Action Network, and Nuclear Threat Initiative, is intended to inform and guide ongoing conversations among governments and non-governmental stakeholders on the parameters and design of the new Fund and action plan.